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Author Topic: Kino Lorber 2 - Disc 4K Blu-ray 2017  (Read 13302 times)
mike siegel
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« Reply #135 on: July 19, 2017, 04:17:59 AM »

NOBODY: Your article in RETRO sums it all up very well.

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« Reply #136 on: July 19, 2017, 08:21:16 PM »

No its not restored.

Kino's representative basically shrugged off this request when it was pointed out it was changed from the original release. They have a really defensive attitude towards anything detail related. Don't expect accuracy unfortunately, we won't be getting Leone's cut.

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« Reply #137 on: July 19, 2017, 08:22:21 PM »

Of course.
The major artistic difference to CinemaScope (or any other anamorphic process) is the depth of focus possible when filming with TechniScope. The image compositions Leone did together with his cinematographers would NOT have been possible with anamorphic lenses!

Great info Mike - thanks!

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« Reply #138 on: July 20, 2017, 07:23:07 AM »

NOBODY: Your article in RETRO sums it all up very well.

Thanks Mike  Afro

By the way, has anyone read Sidney Lumet's book "Making Movies"? I came across a copy at the local library the other day. I haven't finished it yet, but have read a nice chapter in it where he talks about specific lens choices for certain scenes in his films.

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mike siegel
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« Reply #139 on: July 20, 2017, 07:33:14 AM »

When I decided to make films 20 years ago, out of my 1200 books on film about five volumes became my "bibles". His book was included of course Smiley.

Making films & the choice of lenses are always tied together of course. Funny, starting with my work on the German TWO-LANE BLACKTOP Blu-ray,
I come across the "TechniScope-theme" every week now. For instance I just watched (my usual) dose of HAMMER-films and had almost forgotten that
some had been filmed in TechniScope as well (the process was linked to Technicolor Europe). Of course they had VERY limited budgets and possibilities,
and you also find some shots that could not have been filmed with anamorphic lenses, but one really has to look out for TechniScope there while
Leone's films are really a powerful demonstration of what was possible when using the process...

« Last Edit: July 20, 2017, 07:41:21 AM by mike siegel » Logged


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« Reply #140 on: July 20, 2017, 11:10:43 AM »

Leone may have shot in TechniScope on FOD because of the small budget, but even once he had larger budgets, he stuck with TechniScope. All 5 of his Westerns are in TechniScope, right? That means he was doing it for reasons other than saving money.

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mike siegel
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« Reply #141 on: July 20, 2017, 11:22:37 AM »

TechniScope was not as bad as the Americans thought it was. On the screen you couldn't really see the difference (regarding grain & detail) to regular Scope films. The prints they made at Technicolor in Rome were very good, they had the experience, also thanks to the superior dye-transfer process (which ended in the 1970s).

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« Reply #142 on: July 20, 2017, 12:31:41 PM »

TechniScope was not as bad as the Americans thought it was. On the screen you couldn't really see the difference (regarding grain & detail) to regular Scope films. The prints they made at Technicolor in Rome were very good, they had the experience, also thanks to the superior dye-transfer process (which ended in the 1970s).
Add to this the fact that you didn't get the distortion (the so called "mumps") of Cinemascope, and you could even say Techniscope was the superior process.

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« Reply #143 on: July 20, 2017, 01:00:03 PM »

Leone may have shot in TechniScope on FOD because of the small budget, but even once he had larger budgets, he stuck with TechniScope. All 5 of his Westerns are in TechniScope, right? That means he was doing it for reasons other than saving money.

The majority of the Spags which were shot in a 2,35:1 aspect ratio used Techniscope. It was the usual thing back then in Italy.

But I've read that the picture quality was less good. I think otherwise everybody should have used it the 60s and 70s.

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« Reply #144 on: July 20, 2017, 01:07:27 PM »

Add to this the fact that you didn't get the distortion (the so called "mumps") of Cinemascope, and you could even say Techniscope was the superior process.

You can use anamorphic distortion very creatively. Most recently, Scorcese did this great shot of the steps in Silence at the 0:42 mark here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuTjBL28l0U#t=0m42s

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« Reply #145 on: July 20, 2017, 01:32:50 PM »

Another creative use of very wide-angle lenses is to make things seem further apart than they are. The into to "My Name is Nobody" is a good example of this since the gunslingers appear to be very far away but then appear in front of the camera very quickly as if they have covered a huge amount of ground.

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mike siegel
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« Reply #146 on: July 20, 2017, 02:14:28 PM »

Again, TechniScope wasn't bad at all.
The major reason why it was used mostly in Italy (and France) was the fact that
it was an invention by Technicolor/Rome and only Technicolor Rome could
work with it! Got it?

I saw OUATITW on the biggest screens in Germany many times and
it looked GREAT, SUPERIOR, AWESOME.
The major reason for lesser picture quality is the loss of generations.
Some LA productions were 5 generations away from the negative
once they hit your screen in Amsterdam. While the TechniScope prints
from Rome had often one or two generations less (and DYE-TRANSFER!).
That more than made up for the smaller negative image.
I rest my case...

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« Reply #147 on: July 27, 2017, 08:54:00 PM »

When UA was preparing the cut-down version of the film Leone reportedly was involved in editing decisions.
According to SL, he preferred that whole scenes be excised rather than a lot of short bits.

If this is the case, one can't but wish that the LVC scene at the fort had been retained and the entertaining but not plot advancing EW gun shop scene had been excised.

IT's not that I don't like that scene but If I had to cut down the film to 2 hrs. and forty minutes it would seem to be the logical choice . I believe the British distributors cut it ou to make the film even shorter!
Bruce Marshall

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« Reply #148 on: July 27, 2017, 08:58:38 PM »

When I decided to make films 20 years ago, out of my 1200 books on film about five volumes became my "bibles". His book was included of course Smiley.

Making films & the choice of lenses are always tied together of course. Funny, starting with my work on the German TWO-LANE BLACKTOP Blu-ray,
I come across the "TechniScope-theme" every week now. For instance I just watched (my usual) dose of HAMMER-films and had almost forgotten that
some had been filmed in TechniScope as well (the process was linked to Technicolor Europe). Of course they had VERY limited budgets and possibilities,
and you also find some shots that could not have been filmed with anamorphic lenses, but one really has to look out for TechniScope there while
Leone's films are really a powerful demonstration of what was possible when using the process...

Well, Super 35 replaced it and is superior because it has a larger negative capture and is ten percent wider.
I hate it and Techniscope. Very few directors know how to frame in this "narrow screen" format.
Shoot either spherical or anamorphic, dammitt!

bruce marshall

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"Other Morton's will come along  and they'll kill it off"

My article on the restoration of the The Big Gundown
http://thekinskifiles.blogspot.com/2009/01/cinemaretro-13-big-gundown.html
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« Reply #149 on: July 27, 2017, 09:00:08 PM »

The majority of the Spags which were shot in a 2,35:1 aspect ratio used Techniscope. It was the usual thing back then in Italy.

But I've read that the picture quality was less good. I think otherwise everybody should have used it the 60s and 70s.

IIRC AMERICAN GRAFITTI wa the last to us this process, in the US at least


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"Other Morton's will come along  and they'll kill it off"

My article on the restoration of the The Big Gundown
http://thekinskifiles.blogspot.com/2009/01/cinemaretro-13-big-gundown.html
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