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Author Topic: Tribute to a Bad Man (1956)  (Read 657 times)
titoli
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« on: August 29, 2014, 07:05:47 AM »

Not bad enough for my tastes. More of a melodrama than a western, unredeemed by Cagney's and Papas performances. 5\10

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Spikeopath
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« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2017, 03:37:47 AM »

Because the other Cagney Western is on topic, here's the other one.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0049881/reference

Jeremy Rodock's Valley.

Tribute to a Bad Man is directed by Robert Wise and adapted to screenplay by Michael Blankfort from the short story Hanging's for the Lucky written by Jack Schaefer. A CinemaScope/Eastman Color production, it stars James Cagney, Don Dubbins, Stephen McNally and Irene Papas. Music is by Miklós Rózsa and cinematography by Robert Surtees.

Jeremy Rodock (Cagney) is a no nonsense rancher whose ruthless hold on his considerable spread of land includes hanging rustlers without trial or sentence. When young Steve Millar (Dubbins) helps Rodock in a time of need, he is offered work on the ranch. But when his Greek mistress Jocasta Constantine (Papas) attracts interest from Steve and wrangler McNulty (McNally), it forces Rodock into even darker shades of his character.

Following on from the wonderful Run for Cover the previous year, Cagney returned to the Western arena for the last time for Tribute to a Bad Man, and what a fitting picture on which to leave the West.

The film encountered problems in early production when Spencer Tracy had a sulk and walked off of the picture. So in came Cagney. Steve Millar was being played by Robert Francis, but the actor was tragically killed in a plane crash, so in stepped Dubbins. Wise's film is essentially a coming of age frontier Western, though it concerns two male characters coming of age at different places in their life. Millar is the young pup who has come West to seek employment and meaning in his life, Rodock is hard-bitten, grizzled and can't see further than his own pig-headed beliefs. Rodock will either have to change his ways, wake up and smell the coffee, or risk losing everything.

Will Rodock come through? Can an old dog be taught new psychological tricks? When he once again deals out his own brand of justice he has surely gone too far this time? It also opens up an old rivalry wound that will ultimately define all involved. What is in store for Millar? Once his eyes have been opened and he sees that cowboy life can actually be harsh, as can his young emotions. Then there is the beautiful Jocasta, a woman ashamed of her past life back in Cheyenne, forever grateful to Rodock for taking her away from that life. The age difference between the two is considerable, but their relationship is based on trust, loyalty and realism. That is until the equilibrium is upset…

Technically it's a sumptuous production, where even if the thematics of the story doesn't sound like your thing, it's a film worth spending time with just to see Surtees' Scope photography and hear Rózsa's score. The former brings the striking Colorado Rockies to life with some breath taking distinction, while the latter provides music that positively swells then swirls around the magnificent back drop. With Cagney on mesmerising form, Papas and Dubbins not letting their inexperience affect the picture (Cagney took both under his wing), and Wise stringing it together as a knowing character based tapestry, it rounds out as a darn great and beautiful Oater. 8/10

Region 1 DVD Archive Collection.


« Last Edit: April 25, 2017, 03:43:27 AM by Spikeopath » Logged
cigar joe
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« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2017, 04:49:14 AM »

Sorry, don't agree about this one I can never get through it, Cagney just sticks out like a sore thumb as out of place, same for me with Dan Duryea, same with Bogart save for Treasure of The Sierra Madre. They are out of their Genre so to speak,  Grin.

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« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2017, 09:56:33 AM »

merged

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« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2017, 12:48:16 PM »

Sorry, don't agree about this one I can never get through it, Cagney just sticks out like a sore thumb as out of place, same for me with Dan Duryea, same with Bogart save for Treasure of The Sierra Madre. They are out of their Genre so to speak,  Grin.

I wonder which Duryea oaters you watched: some deliver extraordinary performances by him.

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« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2017, 04:16:36 PM »

I wonder which Duryea oaters you watched: some deliver extraordinary performances by him.

These, Winchester '73 (1950), Silver Lode (1954), Night Passage (1957), The Bounty Killer (1965), he always comes off to me as a wise ass street punk/crook. I always hear his New York accent, the same goes for William Bendix too, they seem off to me when they are in Westerns.

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titoli
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« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2017, 05:04:07 PM »

These, Winchester '73 (1950), Silver Lode (1954), Night Passage (1957), The Bounty Killer (1965), he always comes off to me as a wise ass street punk/crook. I always hear his New York accent, the same goes for William Bendix too, they seem off to me when they are in Westerns.

What do you think was Billy the Kid's accent? Anyway check Ride Clear of Diablo.

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Spikeopath
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« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2017, 12:01:13 AM »

Sorry, don't agree about this one I can never get through it, Cagney just sticks out like a sore thumb as out of place, same for me with Dan Duryea, same with Bogart save for Treasure of The Sierra Madre. They are out of their Genre so to speak,  Grin.

Yer wrong  Evil

As for the D.D. statement, you should be locked up for that  Grin

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cigar joe
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« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2017, 04:20:05 AM »

Yer wrong  Evil

As for the D.D. statement, you should be locked up for that  Grin

Being from New York I have an ear for the various NYC accents, no matter how well they try and disguise them I hear it, Love D.D. in Noirs, never believed him in Westerns.

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« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2017, 08:23:19 AM »

Being from New York I have an ear for the various NYC accents, no matter how well they try and disguise them I hear it, Love D.D. in Noirs, never believed him in Westerns.

So you know what was the accent BTK sported?

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« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2017, 09:47:29 AM »

So you know what was the accent BTK sported?

Back then, probably Irish more than what I'm talking about.

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