Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
June 20, 2018, 10:11:02 PM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  John Ford
0 and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 [2] 3 4 5
: John Ford  ( 8362 )
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13967

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #15 : January 05, 2013, 11:30:02 AM »

Good news:

http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/The-Quiet-Man-Blu-ray/58675/#Screenshots

Quote
The results are, in a word, sumptuous. The unbelievably gorgeous Technicolor cinematography of Winton Hoch and Archie Stout boasts all of the incredible variety of greens imaginable, but best of all (at least for true Technicolor aficionados), the reds are simply rock solid, from the slight auburn tint of O'Hara's hair to the deeper crimson of the dress she sometimes wears. The image is wonderfully sharp and precise and there are no major stability issues to report. Are there any issues? Well, yes, a couple of extremely minor ones which are in some cases no doubt endemic to the source elements, including some minor density fluctuations in some of the rear projection materials, and one or two times where some very moderate ringing surrounds objects. Olive has a long history of not digitally tweaking their releases, and some may wonder if that's the case here, given the relative paucity of overt overwhelming grain, but if any noise reduction has been applied, it's been done very judiciously as fine detail remains strong. Overall this is one gorgeous looking transfer that preserves the film's natural look while offering it in about as pristine a version as could be hoped for.



That's what you get, Drink, for not appreciating the genius of When You Read This Letter.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13967

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #16 : January 18, 2013, 11:45:24 AM »

Holy Frack! http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/How-Green-Was-My-Valley-Blu-ray/37102/#Review

Ordered!



That's what you get, Drink, for not appreciating the genius of When You Read This Letter.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8668

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #17 : November 17, 2014, 03:30:33 PM »

Having recently read both Eyman's and McBride's Ford bios, I've now been wanting to see the movie that are discussed therein that I haven't seen that are supposed to be decent. (In any replies to me, please don't spoil any of his films that I say I haven't seen. Thanks  ;) )
I believe I have seen all of Ford's sound Westerns starting with Stagecoach. Gotta see some of the non-Westerns. Just saw The Wings of Eagles, as I discussed recently. I hear The Fugitive is supposed to be his worst movie ever. I recently read a critic I believe Richard Schickel say that he liked it. I gotta watch The Long Voyage Home and The Last Hurrah.

I haven't seen the silent films or the very early sound films, with one exception: I saw The Black Watch (1929), Ford'd very first sound movie, based on the book KING OF THE KHYBER RIFLES (a movie was later made with that title, based on the same book, with Tyrone Power in the 1950's which I liked a lot when I saw years ago). Anyway, in The Black Watch, Victor McLaglen is lead actor and John Wayne supposedly is in his first movie ever, as an extra, I couldn't see him. I bought a shitty (unofficial, of course!) DVD of the movie on eBay and then gave it to CJ. Quality is crappy, as this 5-minute clip available on YouTube shows https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUx1v6Bx0eI

Anyway, starting with Stagecoach, I believe I have seen all Ford's Westerns.
RE: his non-Westerns, starting with The Informer, I believe I've seen, off the top of my head: The Informer,Young Mr. Lincoln The Grapes of Wrath, How Green Was My Valley, They Were Expendable, The Quiet Man, The Wings of Eagles. And I have seen Drums Along the Mohawk, whether or not you consider it a Western.
Among the documentaries Ford made, I believe I've only seen The Battle of Midway

at some point, maybe I'll check against his filmography on IMDB and then make a complete list of his movies that I have haven't (yet) seen

« : November 18, 2014, 05:21:33 AM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1812



« #18 : November 17, 2014, 04:13:18 PM »

Which of the bios do you recommend? I'd be more interested in the 1935-65 years and the more film orientated book if that makes sense.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #19 : November 17, 2014, 05:07:22 PM »

Just watched The Last Hurrah yesterday and really enjoyed it. I can share my review if you like. I remember liking The Long Voyage Home but I haven't seen it in years.

I haven't seen The Fugitive yet - aside from occasional TCM airings, it's near-impossible to catch - but I really doubt it's worse than The Plough and the Stars.

Of the biographies, I very much prefer McBride to Eyman, but you can't go wrong with either.

« : November 17, 2014, 05:35:36 PM Groggy »


Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8668

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #20 : November 17, 2014, 06:11:10 PM »

Which of the bios do you recommend? I'd be more interested in the 1935-65 years and the more film orientated book if that makes sense.

both are good

McBride's is much longer

but I rarely read bios in full. all i really care about is the analysis of the films I have seen. so I skip to the parts that discuss the movies I've seen.
I've found that biographers are sometimes a lot more interesting to read discussing movies than are the critics who write books about movies. I.e. "A Biography of John Doe" often has more interesting discussion of John Doe's movies than a book like "The Films of John Doe."
(I especially don't wanna read all about John Ford's life - he was a real asshole)
So, I didn't read either bio in full. But Groggy liked McBride's better.

btw, Eyman's bio on Wayne is spectacular, I read that cover to cover.

I got Tag Gallagher's Ford book from the library, I will read that one soon



« : November 18, 2014, 05:24:27 AM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #21 : November 17, 2014, 06:31:37 PM »

btw, Eyman's bio on Wayne is spectacular, I read that cover to cover.

 O0



Saturday nights with Groggy
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3097



« #22 : November 18, 2014, 02:08:41 AM »

I hear The Fugitive is supposed to be his worst movie ever. I recently read a critic I believe Richard Schickel say that he liked it.


Where can one hear or read such strange things?

The Fugitive is surely a pretty good Ford film. And is closer to one of his best than one of his worst films.


drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8668

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #23 : November 18, 2014, 05:27:23 AM »

Where can one hear or read such strange things?

The Fugitive is surely a pretty good Ford film. And is closer to one of his best than one of his worst films.

I think it was the book of Schickel's conversations with Scorsese (a great book, btw). I recall Schickel saying something like that it's considered the worst of Ford's movies, but he likes it.

I'll watch it eventually.

These movies which I wanna see just to complete Ford's ouevre but which I am not that confident about, I won't rent the DVD but I'll wait till it plays on TCM (though I may be waiting a while; I believe TCM doesn't have the 20th Century Fox library, lotsa Ford's early sound films were made there)


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1812



« #24 : November 18, 2014, 01:56:49 PM »

Thanks for the recommendations fellas.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #25 : November 18, 2014, 04:22:54 PM »

Where can one hear or read such strange things?

The Fugitive is surely a pretty good Ford film. And is closer to one of his best than one of his worst films.

McBride thinks so, as does Eyman. It's not an uncommon sentiment. Maltin gives it 3.5/4 stars though, so the feeling's clearly not univesal.



Saturday nights with Groggy
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #26 : November 18, 2014, 09:14:20 PM »

The Last Hurrah:

Quote
Some John Ford films get lost in the shuffle, and The Last Hurrah (1958) seems unfairly overlooked. A poignant if somewhat misguided political drama, it's anchored by Spencer Tracy's marvelous performance.

In "a New England city" (that can only be Boston), Mayor Frank Skeffington (Spencer Tracy) prepares to run for his fifth term of office. A poor Irishman made good, Skeffington's an effective Mayor and shrewd politician who's not above scheming or bribery to smooth his way. Skeffington's political enemies team against him, running the colorless war hero Greg McCluskey (Tommy Earwood). Reporter Adam Caulfield (Jeffrey Hunter) covers the race: he's Skeffington's nephew, but his wife (Dianne Foster) is the daughter of Skeffington's chief rival (Willis Bouchey). Watching McCluskey's smooth but vacuous campaign, Skeffington realizes his days are numbered.

Adapting Edwin O'Connor's novel, The Last Hurrah shows the same ambivalence as Ford's later Westerns. Skeffington loves his city, knows every constituent by name and does much good: throughout the film he's trying to raise money for a housing development. Simultaneously however, he reveals cutthroat ruthlessness. He raises campaign funds at a friend's wake and blackmails a hostile banker (Basil Rathbone) by appointing his dunderhead son (O.Z. Whitehead) fire chief. As a self-made man with a tragic back story (like many Ford heroes, he obsesses over his dead wife) Skeffington retains our sympathy.

Compared to his idealized frontier communities, Ford's City is unusually jaundiced. There's heavy resentment between the Irish and blue-blooded Brahmins: newspaperman Amos Force (John Carradine) bristles at the thought of Protestant-Catholic intermarriage. (For good measure, a throwaway line labels him an ex-Klansman.) The Establishment resents Skeffington's rise and connive to put him in his place. Skeffington can't count on the fickle public, who parade for Skeffington in the film's opening but later march for McCluskey.

Hurrah's most effective scenes satirize the "new politics" of television and vapid talking points. Ford scores big laughs with McCluskey's TV ad: his wife reads cue cards while a Checkers-like dog barks throughout the broadcast. McCluskey's deemed a "mealy-mouthed maneuverable piece of dough," manipulated by Skeffington's enemies. This distrust of youth extends to Skeffington's own son (Arthur Walsh), a brainless playboy. By film's end, Skeffington morphs into a typical Ford hero: the indispensable iconoclast who outlives his time.

Nostalgia's always tricky, especially with politics. We're inclined to damn our leaders against their idealized predecessors, even if they were corrupt or incompetent. O'Connor based Skeffington on James Michael Curley, the Boston Mayor and Massachusetts Governor twice jailed for fraud. Praising crooked machine politics seems problematic, to say the least, even if the alternative's a moron like McCluskey.

Thankfully, Spencer Tracy assuages any reservations. At first glance Skeffington seems akin to Tracy's other late career founts-of-wisdom, proffering sage advice to callow observers. Yet Tracy relishes Skeffington's rounded personality: his sincere sentimentality, slick humor, resentful ruthlessness and weary resignation. Tracy's pitch-perfect throughout, tough yet amiable, down to his excellent kiss-off line.

Jeffrey Hunter makes a friendly but bland foil. The John Ford Stock Company turns out in force: Willis Bouchey plays a pompous rival, John Carradine a scheming journalist, Ken Curtis a priest, the ubiquitous Jack Pennick a policeman. Even Jane Darwell from The Grapes of Wrath makes a cameo. Donald Crisp gets the best role, playing a cardinal exasperated by demands for his endorsement; Edward Brophy is a slow-witted but devoted ward boss. Pat O'Brien, James Gleason and Dianne Foster also feature.

The Last Hurrah isn't readily identifiable as a John Ford movie. Pictorially it's rather straightforward, aside from a beautiful scene where Skeffington silently ponders his defeat. Certainly the big city setting and political satire seem anomalous. But Hurrah merely transports his concerns to 20th Century America. His cynical idealism fits 20th Century politics as well as the Old West; only Frank Skeffington's opponents could be more dangerous than any Comanche.  8/10

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-last-hurrah.html



Saturday nights with Groggy
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


« #27 : November 18, 2014, 09:16:20 PM »

The Fugitive:

Quote
The Fugitive (1947) proved an expensive setback for John Ford. This highbrow religious allegory befuddled audiences used to his Westerns; critics still debate if it's an unappreciated masterwork or overwrought mess. It's certainly a bipolar movie, beautifully shot but dramatically stillborn.

Set in an unnamed Latin American country, The Fugitive focuses on The Priest (Henry Fonda). The government's outlawed religion and police brutally repress spiritual leaders. The Priest considers leaving the country but can't abandon his new-found flock, even at risk of reprisals. The Lieutenant (Pedro Armendariz) pursues him, but can't help being drawn to The Priest's simple faith. Both men are drawn to The Woman (Dolores Del Rio), an Indian girl with an illegitimate child.

The Fugitive is Ford's most conspicuously artistic movie since The Informer. Ford shoots in Mexico but the real highpoint are Gabriel Figueroas's amazing compositions. The iconographic staging, deep focus photography and extreme closeups often resemble a silent movie. Hence the Priest attending worshipful villagers in chiaroscuro, his conversation with a whore drowned out by a calliope, or Dolores Del Rio resembling Falconetti's Joan of Arc in weeping close-ups. Fugitive's less a collection of set pieces than tableaux, beautifully shot but stiff.

Ford and screenwriter Dudley Nichols adapt Graham Greene's The Power and the Glory, while neutering its edgier content: the Woman's illegitimate child was fathered by the Priest, not the Lieutenant. Instead, Ford's protagonist is that most nauseating of movie priests, utterly guileless, without fault or personality. One critic labeled him a "creeping Jesus," but even that's generous: the Priest inspires but barely acts, merely suffering for a nation's sins. All of Ford's Christ imagery and obnoxious choral music can't make him compelling.

Ford invests his villains with more passion and nuance. The Lieutenant provides Fugitive's best scenes: his ideological torment, grudging respect for the Priest and personal failings combine for a fascinating character. It's unfortunate that when he actually confronts the Priest, we're treated pedantic lectures on faith and morality. Other characters perform purely allegorical functions: the unnamed Woman, the trickster (J. Carrol Naish) who betrays the Priest. The introduction and faith-based finale suggest a garbled Cold War allegory: Fugitive is too unworldly for any "topical" relevance, whatever Ford's narration insists.

Henry Fonda gets one of his worst roles: Nichols' script provides no depth or shading, merely mute anguish. In contrast, Pedro Armendariz exudes passionate torment with a full-blooded performance. Ford later gave Armendariz meaty roles in Three Godfathers and Fort Apache. Ward Bond's enigmatic character never amounts to much. Dolores Del Rio weeps and wails as an overwrought Mexican Madonna; J. Carrol Naish kills his scenes with obnoxious overacting.

John Ford once called The Fugitive his most perfect movie. Indeed, as a directorial showpiece it's perfectly crafted and beautiful to watch. But it's awkwardly-constructed and only intermittently interesting. Ford is so caught up crafting a masterpiece that he doesn't bother making a good movie. 6/10

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-fugitive-1947.html



Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8668

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #28 : December 10, 2014, 11:28:24 PM »

Just saw The Long Voyage Home on TCM.

Absolutely awful movie

5/10

Thomas Mitchell is pretty much the only thing positive about this movie. (Victor McLaglen probably would have been better in this role, he would soon replace Mitchell as Ford's go-to-drunk actor. But Mitchell was very good.) Wayne is first-billed, but for 2/3 of the movie, he is nowhere to be found of all the sailors, he may be the one with literally the least screen time in the first 2/3 of the movie. And even in the last 1/3, he is no more important than the others. Really, there are half-a-dozen characters more important here than Wayne's, with more screen time and more lines.
And Thank God Wayne doesn't speak much till the last few minutes. His so-called Swedish accent is atrocious.

Yinyer beer!


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8668

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #29 : January 19, 2015, 02:41:32 PM »

The Last Hurrah:

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-last-hurrah.html

just saw the movie, and I couldn't disagree more. I found this to be mostly unbearable.

Yes, Tracy is good. The ending is good. And there is one truly great moment, when Tracy walks into the house at the end of the movie, looks at the painting of his wife, and shrugs. But that's all. Jane Darwell's character here is particularly insufferable. This movie takes all the worst of John Ford and rolls it into one. We can't go two minutes without someone reminding us that he's Irish (though no drunk Irishmen  - apparently Victor McLaglen wasn't available). I am amazed that the same man that made Stagecoach, Fort Apache, My Darling Clementine, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, etc. could make this piece of shit. 4/10


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
: 1 [2] 3 4 5  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.09144