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Author Topic: Farewell, My Lovely (1975)  (Read 7320 times)
drinkanddestroy
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« Reply #30 on: November 04, 2017, 05:06:30 PM »

Is this still the DVD? Or is there a BRD?

I have never seen Mitchumís THE BIG SLEEP. Is it good?

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« Reply #31 on: November 04, 2017, 05:52:15 PM »

Is this still the DVD? Or is there a BRD?

I have never seen Mitchumís THE BIG SLEEP. Is it good?

It follows the novel better than the Bogart/Bacall version that was retooled to take advantage of the chemistry that arced across the screen between Bogart and Bacall, the studio added a love story angle and the accompanying dialog.

The Big Sleep (1978) follows the novel more closely with it's original dialog, and isn't hampered by the Hayes Code. It's biggest complication is the whole story is shifted to The United Kingdom and updated to the then present 1978. Instead of ramshackle, decrepit and shabby it wallows in old world opulence. Marlowe drives a '71 BMW instead of a 1930's Marmon.

All this modifying and Anglify-ing is interesting considering that Chandler was sort of modified and Anglicized himself, born in 1888 in Chicago, Illinois, he spent a few years in Nebraska living along the Missouri River with relatives and then moved with his mother at the age of 12 in 1900 after his father abandoned them to a borough of London in the UK. He flipped back again ending up in the States, moving first to San Francisco, then Los Angeles.

So I'll repeat, if you don't know that the original story was supposed to be all taking place in 1939 and was supposed to be in Los Angeles you'll actually find it a pretty good film, the story updates pretty much flawlessly. Marlowe in this version, is an ex US soldier who stayed on in the UK after WWII to open a Commercial and Civil Investigations Agency and all the supporting cast is actually top notch.

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« Reply #32 on: November 04, 2017, 05:56:11 PM »

It follows the novel better than the Bogart/Bacall version that was retooled to take advantage of the chemistry that arced across the screen between Bogart and Bacall, the studio added a love story angle and the accompanying dialog.

The Big Sleep (1978) follows the novel more closely with it's original dialog, and isn't hampered by the Hayes Code. It's biggest complication is the whole story is shifted to The United Kingdom and updated to the then present 1978. Instead of ramshackle, decrepit and shabby it wallows in old world opulence. Marlowe drives a '71 BMW instead of a 1930's Marmon.

All this modifying and Anglify-ing is interesting considering that Chandler was sort of modified and Anglicized himself, born in 1888 in Chicago, Illinois, he spent a few years in Nebraska living along the Missouri River with relatives and then moved with his mother at the age of 12 in 1900 after his father abandoned them to a borough of London in the UK. He flipped back again ending up in the States, moving first to San Francisco, then Los Angeles.

So I'll repeat, if you don't know that the original story was supposed to be all taking place in 1939 and was supposed to be in Los Angeles you'll actually find it a pretty good film, the story updates pretty much flawlessly. Marlowe in this version, is an ex US soldier who stayed on in the UK after WWII to open a Commercial and Civil Investigations Agency and all the supporting cast is actually top notch.

Thanks! Iíll give it a try  Smiley

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« Reply #33 on: November 06, 2017, 06:42:24 AM »

Looking forward to the double bill blu-ray. Having said that, I'm not a big fan of this adaptation of The Big Sleep. Mitchum sleepwalks through most of the movie, James Stewart is painful to watch (not his fault, his physical issues are just clearly on display here) and it feels like half the script was updated to the late 70s UK while the other half wasn't. OTOH, it's got a superb supporting cast, from Oliver Reed to John Mills to Joan Collins and so on.

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