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: Crime films on my IMDb ratings page  ( 14851 )
greenbudgie
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« : August 11, 2018, 06:58:43 AM »

I thought that I would keep this board up to date with what crime films that I am rating on IMDb. So I will give a little mini review of these films on this thread as I give them a rating. To view my ratings list just click on the signature link on any of my posts. I will try to avoid those films that have an entry on the noir and gangster indexes on here. And keep it to those films which have a crime or crime-linked theme.


greenbudgie
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« #1 : August 11, 2018, 07:11:27 AM »

                                                           DEFENCE OF THE REALM (1986). Rated 7/10.

This is a creepy conspiracy thriller set in the then contemporary Thatcherite Cold War UK. Gabriel Byrne is a journalist who is onto some eerie goings-on an US airbase. He tries to expose what seems like a government cover-up. He is constantly tracked in his car with vehicle lights showing up in his window. There are some good night scenes in particular. Denham Elliott is the standout of the supporting cast of British actors. The weird music adds to the creeping paranoia of the story.

« : August 11, 2018, 07:34:48 AM greenbudgie »

greenbudgie
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« #2 : August 11, 2018, 07:20:30 AM »

                                                                      THE INTRUDER (1953). Rated 7/10

This is a bit of hodgepodge genre-wise but it has enough of a crime element to include it on here. Jack Hawkins is Colonel Merton, a retired army commander. He returns home to find one of his ex-soldiers burgling his place. This is Ginger Edwards played by Michael Medwin. Merton asks how a good soldier can turn into a thief. Flashbacks then reveal how this came to be. There's a good mean cameo from Edward Chapman who played in some of Hitchcock's early thrillers including 'Murder' (1930).


greenbudgie
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« #3 : August 11, 2018, 07:31:59 AM »

                                                                  INTRUDER IN THE DUST (1949). Rated 9/10.

This a great William Faulkner crime story and my favourite screen adaptation of his works. Lucas Beauchamp (played by Juano Hernandez) is found standing over the body of a murdered man and the town puts him on trial. He is helped by a white boy who owes him a favour. This is reminiscent of Magwitch and Pip in Dickens' 'Great Expectations.' This is reinforced by an old woman called Miss Habersham reminding us of the Miss Haversham of the Dickens story. The old woman in this is played by Elizabeth Patterson who was in some of the 1930s Bulldog Drummond series of films. There is a great scene of Miss Habersham exhuming a body from a grave at night with the aid of two teenagers.


moorman
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« #4 : August 11, 2018, 07:39:48 PM »

Thanks for starting this thread. Gonna check out a few of these...

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« #5 : August 12, 2018, 03:00:13 AM »

                                                                THE KREMLIN LETTER (1970). Rated 5/10.

I checked for this on the neo noir index but didn't spot it. This espionage thriller was too bleak and complicated for me. Tough guy Richard Boone is the best thing about this movie so his fans will want to see it. There are some interesting cameos including Orson Welles playing a gay man. No wonder he didn't seem interested in his role. The use of sex entrapment amongst spies takes up a lot of the 2 hours. There is a lack of atmosphere which added to the bleakness while I always think that atmosphere is an important ingredient in crime films.


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« #6 : August 12, 2018, 07:38:23 PM »

                                                                  INTRUDER IN THE DUST (1949). Rated 9/10.

This a great William Faulkner crime story and my favourite screen adaptation of his works. Lucas Beauchamp (played by Juano Hernandez) is found standing over the body of a murdered man and the town puts him on trial. He is helped by a white boy who owes him a favour. This is reminiscent of Magwitch and Pip in Dickens' 'Great Expectations.' This is reinforced by an old woman called Miss Habersham reminding us of the Miss Haversham of the Dickens story. The old woman in this is played by Elizabeth Patterson who was in some of the 1930s Bulldog Drummond series of films. There is a great scene of Miss Habersham exhuming a body from a grave at night with the aid of two teenagers.

I watched this. GREAT film recommendation.  There was not a boring moment in the film.  The plot was pretty good.  Juano Hernandez was excellent here.  Claude Jarmin Jr and Elizabeth Patterson were fantastic also.  My only problem with the acting is David Brain's character as the lawyer was speaking in a tone as if he was narrating a film noir.  It was pretty anoying early on but got better as it starting fitting the plot which went off into noir territory.   Other than that I have no gripes with the film.  I saw it on Youtube and want to get the DVD.   I rate this a 9 out of 10...

greenbudgie
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« #7 : August 13, 2018, 03:24:27 AM »

I'm glad you enjoyed this recommendation M. I see what you mean about the lawyer's noir-narration style. I thought his delivery was a bit ostentatious in parts. But there was some good lines in there as well.


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« #8 : August 13, 2018, 03:44:18 AM »

                                                                        MAROC 7 (1967). Rated 4/10.

This is about jewel theft and intrigue in Morocco. There is a heavy Hitchcockian influence in this especially 'To Catch A Thief,' 'The Man Who Knew Too Much' and 'North By Northwest' reminisces amongst the action. Gene Barry seemed a bit too old to be amongst the 1960s beautiful babes that he's surrounded by, whereas Cary Grant had still been able to get away with it at the aged 50 mark. The women were all clad in this so he didn't get the James Bond attention popular in the 1960s. The print that I saw of this was poor which may have contributed to me devaluing this. But even so, none of the cast seem to be giving anything much of themselves. Cyd Charisse playing a non-musical role is the best thing about this movie and she was still looking good at 45.

« : August 14, 2018, 03:11:07 AM greenbudgie »

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« #9 : August 14, 2018, 03:24:10 AM »

                                                                  MILLER'S CROSSING (1990). Rated 9/10.

This is about 1920s Prohibition-era mob warfare between the Italian and Irish communities. It was filmed in New Orleans which helps to give it a Jazz-era feel I think. After seeing him in 'Defence of the Realm' recently I am fast becoming a Gabriel Byrne fan. He is terrific in this and is on screen for the greatest party of the film. He gets chucked out of the Irish mob, led by Albert Finney, and then finds himself awkwardly caught in the crossfire, so to speak, between the rival gangs. Also great in this is John Turturro as the Jewish upstart. The snappy dialogue is good and I'm sure this will have appeal to the fans of gangster films, noir and neo-noir genres.


kjrwe
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« #10 : August 14, 2018, 09:33:25 PM »

Thanks for the thread. I'll be on the lookout for recommendations. Cheers.

greenbudgie
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« #11 : August 16, 2018, 03:34:23 AM »

                                                                           MIRACLES (1986). Rated 5/10.

This is a crime comedy for the family. Things go hare-brained and ballistic from the very start and continues in a light-hearted vein right through to the end. A bank robber fleeing from the scene of his crime and causes a vehicle pile-up. This reunites a divorced couple (Tom Conti and Teri Garr) who are kidnapped and forced to bicker their way together through the rest of the film. My favourite contribution is from Christopher Lloyd who played the whacky Judge Doom in 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' in 1988. He is one of the bungling robbers/kidnappers who has a great manic piloting scene in an aeroplane. Another really great moment is a cameo from Barbara Whinnery as a hooker who mistakenly thinks the police are after her and runs along a street with only one high-heeled shoe.


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« #12 : August 17, 2018, 02:59:31 AM »

                                                                        NAKED ALIBI (1954). Rated 9/10.

I'm putting my comments on this film on it's individual page found on the Noir Index. This is an underrated movie in my opinion.


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« #13 : August 20, 2018, 05:29:30 AM »

                                                                    THE LAST MAN TO HANG (1956). Rated 7/10.

Sir Roderick Strood stands trial for the murder of his wife. He is played by Tom Conway who had been the title character in some of the 1940s Falcon detective film series. The jury scenes are now reminiscent of '12 Angry Men' (1957). The most important feature of this film is to show how much argument there was in the UK in the 1950s. The argument about whether hanging should continue after some iffy verdicts in murder trials in that decade.

The best acting is by Elizabeth Sellars as the weakly-looking wife. She contributed to many good moments in UK crime films of the 1950s.


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« #14 : August 22, 2018, 04:07:14 AM »

                                                                       FRAGMENT OF FEAR (1970). Rated 7/10

Tim Brett has got himself clean from drugs and goes on holiday to Italy with his aunt. Flora Robson as the aunt gets murdered mysteriously and David Hemmings as Brett starts to investigate. When he gets back to London, his apartment gets visited secretly leaving all sorts of ominous threats. He feels intimidated by the weird happenings there which leaves him in a confused state. There is good creepy suspense and a string of cameos by popular British actors. Particularly nightmarish is when Hemmings is seemingly surrounded and snogged by weird old ladies. The story is left unresolved at the end but this is still a good psychological thriller.


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