Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
February 20, 2019, 04:07:15 AM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Top 100 Photographed Films of 20th Cent.
0 and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: [1] 2
: Top 100 Photographed Films of 20th Cent.  ( 233 )
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14222

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« : February 13, 2019, 10:33:06 AM »

From The American Society of Cinematographers but not limited to American films.
https://theasc.com/news/asc-unveils-list-of-100-milestone-films-in-cinematography-of-the-20th-century
It is gratifying to see OUATITW on the list. I am puzzled as to why Tess is not there.



Ya measly skunk! A-campin’ on my trail and lettin’ me do the work an’ then shootin’ me in the back. IN THE BACK!
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1851



« #1 : February 13, 2019, 02:48:20 PM »

We've all seen way too many movies to ever like one of these lists, but how did they not include a single John Alton shot movie?

I don't think the list included any Michael Mann movies either.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 3164



« #2 : February 14, 2019, 03:31:41 AM »


It's basically a Hollywood list of course, just like IMDB or AFI lists, and stuff like that.

They should have been more consequently and left of all films made outside the USA (and maybe the UK), as there are already enough impressive films from the US which are not mentioned.


dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14222

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #3 : February 14, 2019, 05:36:09 AM »

It's basically a Hollywood list of course, just like IMDB or AFI lists, and stuff like that.

They should have been more consequently and left of all films made outside the USA (and maybe the UK), as there are already enough impressive films from the US which are not mentioned.
Yes, undoubtedly.

It is interesting as a conversation starter, though. Obviously they can't include every well-shot film, and there are many, many omissions. What I find interesting are the films that made the list that I would never consider. A case in point: The French Connection in the top 10. The virtues of that film are manifold, but pictorial beauty is not one of them. Of course, being "well-shot" is kinda vague: it could apply to a film that is supposed to look gritty to be appropriate for its gritty subject matter. So a "well-shot" film could actually look quite ugly. And in the case of The French Connection, the fact that it was so hugely influential might be the deciding factor. Still, I would never have put it on the list or voted for it.



Ya measly skunk! A-campin’ on my trail and lettin’ me do the work an’ then shootin’ me in the back. IN THE BACK!
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 3164



« #4 : February 14, 2019, 05:42:41 AM »

Yes, and what is with Hitchcock? I never thought that any of his films is a masterpiece of photography. Not even near.



noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5470


Lonesome Billy


« #5 : February 14, 2019, 07:12:06 AM »

Yes, and what is with Hitchcock? I never thought that any of his films is a masterpiece of photography. Not even near.

Vertigo always looked gorgeous to me. I’m pretty sure it won its title with a single scene, maybe even a single shot: Madeleine in the restaurant, the first time we see her.

I was very, very surprised about the French Connection too. You probably raise the right points about it.



New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14222

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #6 : February 14, 2019, 10:23:39 AM »

Vertigo stands out because of its Sirkian use of colors. But why NxNW? All those Robert Burks color films look pretty much the same, but, Vertigo aside, the color Hitchcock that really catches my eye is To Catch a Thief. I mean, which would you rather look at, the cote d'azur or blah farmland outside Bakersfield, CA?



Ya measly skunk! A-campin’ on my trail and lettin’ me do the work an’ then shootin’ me in the back. IN THE BACK!
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5470


Lonesome Billy


« #7 : February 14, 2019, 10:42:07 AM »

Vertigo stands out because of its Sirkian use of colors. But why NxNW? All those Robert Burks color films look pretty much the same, but, Vertigo aside, the color Hitchcock that really catches my eye is To Catch a Thief. I mean, which would you rather look at, the cote d'azur or blah farmland outside Bakersfield, CA?

I've spent a month per year during my whole childhood on the Cote d'Azur so I'll always find US boring farms more cinema friendly.

You're right about Vertigo's use of colors. Rear Windows had better colors than to Catch A Thief, though. Also let's not forget that it's sometimes hard do draw the line between cinematography and mise en scene.



New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1851



« #8 : February 14, 2019, 01:03:44 PM »

Yes, undoubtedly.

It is interesting as a conversation starter, though. Obviously they can't include every well-shot film, and there are many, many omissions. What I find interesting are the films that made the list that I would never consider. A case in point: The French Connection in the top 10. The virtues of that film are manifold, but pictorial beauty is not one of them. Of course, being "well-shot" is kinda vague: it could apply to a film that is supposed to look gritty to be appropriate for its gritty subject matter. So a "well-shot" film could actually look quite ugly. And in the case of The French Connection, the fact that it was so hugely influential might be the deciding factor. Still, I would never have put it on the list or voted for it.
I don't agree with The French Connection making the top 10, but I do think differently of it from a visual standpoint after watching the Friedkin approved bluray. But with that said, how do you put that in over movies like Thief or Heat, or even something like The Driver?

I completely agree that it's a very hard thing to judge. For instance, how much should blocking, color usage and set design be factored in? I would put Kurosawa's High and Low in a top 100 shot movies, but the blocking would have a ton to do with it, same with Vertigo for its blocking + color usage.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14222

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #9 : February 15, 2019, 06:50:21 AM »

The website perpetuates the canard that In the Mood For Love was shot by Christopher Doyle. Doyle was only one of three photographers on the film. I believe the lion share of the movie was photographed by Ping Bin Lee (AKA Mark Lee Ping-bin).



Ya measly skunk! A-campin’ on my trail and lettin’ me do the work an’ then shootin’ me in the back. IN THE BACK!
Novecento
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1711



« #10 : February 15, 2019, 08:41:09 PM »

At least Vilmos Zsigmond garnered three entries. "Heaven's Gate" should have made it four.

I'd like to have seen Lajos Koltai in the list as well.

Storaro got five and probably deserves the lot.

...but how did they not include a single John Alton shot movie?

Absolutely unbelievable!

At least Kazuo Miyagawa was included once.

I don't think the list included any Michael Mann movies either.

Yeh - how does Dante Spinotti get in for "L.A. Confidential" and yet nothing with Michael Mann?

drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8847

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #11 : February 16, 2019, 04:53:33 PM »

RE: Vertigo:

Few people alive today have seen Vertigo as it was originally presented. Voting for this movie - which indeed looks gorgeous - is really voting for the restoration.

 I am sure that is the case with many films, but this one more than others.


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14222

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #12 : February 16, 2019, 05:59:59 PM »

I have a problem with McCabe & Mrs. Miller on this list. One could argue that by flashing the negative the film looks worse rather than better than it should. One can also argue that by not flashing portions of the film (especially the final two reels) the film has an inconsistent quality, that the flashed footage and the unflashed footage don't match, and therefore the film is not aesthetically coherent. I'm not here to argue the positions either way. The most egregious thing Altman did, however, can't be alibied. I'm talking about the application of electronic snow on the image to simulate snowflakes falling. It looks terrible, even on the new Criterion Blu-ray. And it's odd that people voted for this film rather than the more successfully photographed The Long Good Bye (which used flashing better AND employed Altman's The Camera Never Stops Moving technique).



Ya measly skunk! A-campin’ on my trail and lettin’ me do the work an’ then shootin’ me in the back. IN THE BACK!
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1851



« #13 : February 16, 2019, 06:01:23 PM »

Yeh - how does Dante Spinotti get in for "L.A. Confidential" and yet nothing with Michael Mann?
L.A. Confidential is one of my 10-20 favorite movies so I was glad to see it included, but Spinotti also shot Manhunter and that should have got the nod before 'Confidential' - which is a beautifully shot movie.


RE: Vertigo:

Few people alive today have seen Vertigo as it was originally presented. Voting for this movie - which indeed looks gorgeous - is really voting for the restoration.

 I am sure that is the case with many films, but this one more than others.
I'm sure seeing Vertigo in its initial run was gorgeous but we now have the privilege to see restored older movies on large TVs, which is the best possible viewing experience outside of seeing a first run print (or at least a good print) on the big screen.

The entire restoration topic is one giant slippery slope that I don't think is worth exploring.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
Novecento
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1711



« #14 : February 17, 2019, 05:50:24 AM »

...  The Long Good Bye (which used flashing better AND employed Altman's The Camera Never Stops Moving technique).

An outstandingly shot film with incredible camera movement. Although, you are now introducing a separate element here. That is to say, cinematography is not just about looking nice in stills but also about motion. Having said that, the desire to use motion may come as much, if not more, from the director than the cinematographer...

: [1] 2  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.073135