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: Ennio (2021)  ( 6190 )
Novecento
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« #15 : July 17, 2022, 06:47:31 AM »

It is indeed ?o samba? in Portuguese, which is masculine. But its Brazilian origins are not from Portuguese but from Bantu from Angola?hence the alternative ?semba?. In Spanish, it became feminine as ?la samba?, perhaps more via association with ?la bamba? than simply its ?a? ending (?problema? is masculine after all), and it seems that it more recently went the same way in Italian.

It?s feminine in French too.

In any case, failing to be a language pedant has nothing to do with the topic of the documentary.

« : July 17, 2022, 07:06:27 AM Novecento »
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« #16 : July 17, 2022, 07:02:48 AM »

Also, regarding sampling classic works, I recall him explicitly mentioning several cases ? was BACH not one of them? Perhaps it was supposed to be implicit?

« : July 17, 2022, 07:03:56 AM Novecento »
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« #17 : July 18, 2022, 09:17:23 AM »

Strangely no effort is made, if not implicitly, to uncover the "spark" which led Morricone to develop his style. In 1958 he made some arrangements for Mario Lanza and nothing is said about them, probably because they are quite traditional. It is  true that the first relevant arrangement he made completely unusual was for Gianni Meccia's  IL barattolo (the can) where he used the effect of a can kicked around (I'm not sure a real can was used or some kind of south-american percussion instead) and from there he got the idea of using strange objects and effects with odd applications of regular instruments or voices he had experimented in classical advanced music which came to define his style. And Il barattolo was not the single which saved Italian RCA, as said in the movie. The one who did was Nico Fidenco's Legata ad un granello di sabbia, arranged by the other arranger of the label, Luis Enriquez Bacalov.


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« #18 : November 04, 2022, 05:06:09 AM »

For UK members the documentary was on SKY ARTS last night. I caught the last hour purely by chance as I had no idea it was on. Good news is it's on again next Wednesday.

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« #19 : February 07, 2024, 11:30:45 AM »

Finally arriving in NYC!
https://filmforum.org/film/ennio?



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« #20 : February 07, 2024, 06:55:20 PM »

https://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/reviews/ennio-review-long-and-loving-ennio-morricone-documentary-suggests-late-composer-is-worthy-of-comparison-to-mozart-and-bach/ar-BB1hWKd1?
Money quote:
Quote
Tornatore doesn't put too fine a point on it or push his subject toward a prefab narrative, but the framework of this documentary tends to suggest that Morricone was so manic because he was determined to prove his worth to Petrassi, and that only by doing so did he begin to believe in it - and in his power to be more than mere accompaniment. There's no greater testament to that than the footage we see from the set of Leone's "Once Upon a Time in America," where Robert De Niro steps into a scene as Morricone's score plays for the actors to hear, as if the music were a part of the air their characters breathed. The notes had always been there, just waiting for Leone to help Morricone see them on the screen, and now they only seem to be growing more resonant with every passing day.



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« #21 : February 08, 2024, 07:14:35 PM »

Two more reviews, one from the WSJ, one from the NYT.

However.

This one doesn't say much:
https://www.wsj.com/arts-culture/film/ennio-review-sage-of-the-soundtrack-01d02e4d?

And this one is behind a paywall:
https://www.nytimes.com/2024/02/08/movies/ennio-review-morricone-film-scores.html

My wife has a subscription to the NYT, so I'll try to get her to send me a copy.



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« #22 : February 08, 2024, 07:44:09 PM »

Mrs. J came through. Here's the highlight of the NYT's piece:
Quote
Among the most engaging sections are those involving Morricone?s work with Sergio Leone. They first collaborated on
Leone?s ?A Fistful of Dollars,? a western set in Mexico, shot in Spain and starring a television actor on hiatus, straight from
Hollywood, named Clint Eastwood. Although Morricone and Leone shared some history, they were not initially on the same
wavelength when they started work on the film. Leone was reinventing the genre and drawing liberally from many of his
adored influences. He lifted the story from Akira Kurosawa?s ?Yojimbo? (Kurosawa later sued), and Leone told Morricone
that he wanted to use some music from Howard Hawks?s ?Rio Bravo? for the climatic duel in ?Dollars.?

Affronted that Leone would use someone else?s music, Morricone threatened to quit, but then, as happened throughout his
life, he had a stroke of brilliance: He dusted off an old lullaby he?d written to which he added a choir and a lonely trumpet,
creating a piece of music that was at once distinct and evoked what Leone admired in ?Rio Bravo.? It had wit, drama,
mystery and genre provenance. And it seemed to emerge from the character: As Eastwood?s gunslinger arrives to face his
enemies in a town square, the trumpet mixes with the sounds of the hard-blowing wind and the character?s rhythmic
footfalls, conveying his isolation and resolve. Like the film?s main theme ? with its whistling and cracking whips ? it also
expresses Morricone.

It took a while for the world to catch up with what he was doing ? and the way he bridged musical realms and blurred the
lines between the serious and the pop until those lines became immaterial. It?s worth remembering that most American film
critics hated ?A Fistful of Dollars? when opened in the United States in 1967, three years after it blew up the Italian box office.
The New York Times critic Bosley Crowther was outraged by its violence, its ?cool, non-hero? and absence of moralism. He
and others also went after Morricone?s music, with Crowther writing that it ?betrays tricks and themes that sound
derivative.?



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« #23 : February 10, 2024, 08:36:59 AM »

The reviews keep coming: https://www.aol.com/ennio-review-ennio-morricone-maestro-191020906.html
Quote
It was only when the two met that Ennio recognized his former schoolmate; there?s an enchanting class picture of them, taken when they were about 10, where they?re sitting, grinning, with just one other student in between them. These two understood each other, and the score Morricone wrote for ?A Fistful of Dollars? (1964) was visionary. The whistling! The cracked whip, the guitar, the anvil. Simply put, there had never been movie music that sounded like this ? it seemed to erupt out of the past, and right into the future. Leone asked Morricone to include ?Deg?ello,? the Mexican folk song of death that?s heard in the distance of ?Rio Bravo,? and while Ennio didn?t simply want to use that song, he wrote his own spectacular variation on it ? music so ecstatic in its melancholy, the trumpet fluttering like a wounded heart, that you can watch that film and have the music dance in your head for weeks. The music was the movie. Morricone literally gave Eastwood?s Man with No Name the soul inside his lethal persona.

"The music was the movie"? Uh, no Gleiberman, good as it is, no. This guy discounts the value of SL (and he goes on to claim that OUATIA is a bad movie).



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
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