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Author Topic: My Name Is Pecos (Due once di piombo-Il mio nome Pecos)(1966)  (Read 9411 times)
iceman
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« on: December 16, 2004, 06:31:07 AM »

Hi all....Back in 1969 ish....when I first got hooked on the Dollar trilogy... I remember  hearing a record in a jukebox called My name is Paco. or Pecos... i'm not sure and it was by Morricone. Has anyone heard of this film/song...I have been trying to get hold of a copy of the music but no luck....maybe I dreamed it !!!  Undecided  Cry
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Belkin
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« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2004, 07:20:06 AM »

Hi all....Back in 1969 ish....when I first got hooked on the Dollar trilogy... I remember  hearing a record in a jukebox called My name is Paco. or Pecos... i'm not sure and it was by Morricone. Has anyone heard of this film/song...I have been trying to get hold of a copy of the music but no luck....maybe I dreamed it !!!  Undecided  Cry
Hope your there C Joe when I need you
MMmmmmmmmmmm! It could be the theme from "MY NAME IS PECOS", a western made in 1966. It starred Peter Carsten (whatever happened to him?). Hope this is some help.

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« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2004, 07:45:39 AM »

P.S. The soundtrack/theme song was by LUIS BACALOV.

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« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2004, 08:39:30 AM »

P.S. The soundtrack/theme song was by LUIS BACALOV.
thanks Belkin but still cant find it...did LB actually write it or just record it  have checked the site below but it doesn't mention it

http://movies.yahoo.com/shop?d=hc&id=1800048070&cf=gen&intl=us

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Belkin
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« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2004, 01:01:29 PM »

As far as I know he wrote the entire soundtrack but I have never come across a CD or LP of the score. I do remember the music was terrific.....far more memorable than the movie! If I'm not mistaken, he also wrote the music for DJANGO (or one of the DJANGO'S) but I could be wrong! Huh

« Last Edit: December 16, 2004, 01:02:10 PM by Belkin » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2004, 01:10:02 PM »

Came across this:

Luis Bacalov (Oscar winner, "Il Postino" 1996)
Interview by Sijbold Tonkens
[i]Sijbold Tonkens: How did your career start in the past as a film composer? I believe you started as Ennio Morricone did at RCA to work with pop stars in Italy like Gianni Morandi, Dino, Rita Pavone etc.
Luis Bacalov: Yes, I was in the field of pop music to earn my life. My ambition was to play piano classical music. I understood that if you are not rich, and I was not, you could make quick money for pop music. The first year when I was in Rome, I was in film music as a pianist. And the composer Giovanni Fusco at the time asked me if I could arrange a piece of music for a film by Chico Marselli called La ragazza con la valigia (The Girl with the Luggage) a film of the '60s.
The film song became a hit in the pop music. And RCA asked me to do more arrangements for pop music. I told them I had no real training in arrangements, but they told me that I did a good work for this song and we suppose that you can do it for all the songs. So I took the deal and I began to arrange pop music.
ST: You worked with Ennio Morricone on the western Quien Sabe, another Damiani film. How was it to work with Morricone?
LB: The story about Quien Sabe is not like people know.
ST: That is why I am asking...
LB: Damiano Damiani told me to do the music on Quien Sabe, thinking that I was from a Latin American country (Argentina) that has a history of Mexicans. And all the people agree with that, but then the producer told me, if you want to do the music, I want Ennio Morricone to supervise the music. I asked why? "Because I want Ennio Morricone's name in the film because he is known for the spaghetti westerns." I was and still am a close friend of Morricone. I told the producer, talk with Morricone, if he accept that, okay. Morricone called me told me the story and finally he told me that I had to write the music. And I told him that they want his name in the film for economical reason.
Morricone's name was in the film, but in reality he never heard the music, he refused to do the supervision. Bacalov can do that. Another thing that was not fair, when the film came to Spain they took away my name and put Ennio Morricone as the composer. I talked to my lawyer and we were to attack the man responsible. My lawyer called me and said, Luis, we can't do anything, because the company does not exist anymore. You cannot fight a ghost.
And that is the story about Quien Sabe? and I think I never talked about that because you are the first to ask.
ST: Was the music influenced by Morricone? Because it sound a lot like Il Mercanerio.
LB: Not at all, but maybe Morricone was influenced by my music? I don't know.
ST: What is the story about Il Postino. You won the Oscar, and I think you had no idea when you wrote it that you would ever win such a price.
LB: The story is amazing, I was in the film at the very last moment. [They asked Morricone first, but he refused, too busy. Now he is sorry I think, he never won an Oscar. -ST] They were in contact with other composers before me, I never asked who they were. But at the very last moment I was asked to do the job quickly. Because they had to finish the film before the Venice film festival.
I knew that Michael Radford was a difficult man with composers. He had his own ideas. We went on well, he loved the idea to follow the tango. I found the girl in the film a sort of Carmen. So I wrote a Spanish/Latin American score. Michael loved the music. He was worried that the orchestration would make the score to big, but I told him that the score could also be small with a bandoneon. He gave me the free hand in the orchestration.
We never expected that this film would be such a smash hit as it is today. After 5 Oscar nominations one Oscar went to the film for the music. When I arrived in Italy many people said, Oh, yes 5 nominations, we deserve more than that. A price for the Oscar. You won it to let the film go with one price. As a concession to the film. Many press asked my opinion about that. I was very rude, telling them undiplomatic things. I said: IF GOD EXIST, HE IS NOT ITALIAN, AND NEITHER AM I. Even if I have an Italian passport. Film music does not mean much to the people, and if it comes to Oscars, they don't know what they are talking about. In America if you have a nomination, it is for life, it opens doors for work. And the people in Rome are so ignorant that they don't know that. That was my reaction. At the end I said that the most incredible thing was that the film was accepted as a very important film. If I had written a much better score for a less important film, I would never had an Oscar. In a way the Oscar was for the Italian film.
The Oscar changed my possibilities. The problem now is to say no, instead of yes to offers. To find the good films to go for. To do concerts with my music, not only film music, but the history of tango among other works
.....[/i]

« Last Edit: December 16, 2004, 01:11:00 PM by Belkin » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2007, 11:04:48 PM »

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060351/

http://www.spaghettiwestern.altervista.org/vari-west60.htm


Everybody seems to like this, can't see why. It was a huge success in Italy but I haven't seen it at the time: maybe because it was restricted (there are some violent scenes)? I don't like the lead (strangely Woods is very wooden here, even in his use of the body: I like him in Franco's movies, though), the story is very basic with no touch of inventiveness. The only spurt of creativity is the spinning wheel used for I won't tell you what : but the director doesn't know what a camera is and where to put it: and the scene comes off absolutely ludicrous.
The story is about a gang of outlaws being stolen of the booty  from a stagecoach heist and terrorising a (ghost?) small town (they hadn't money for extras, evidently) called Houston trying to recover it. Pecos is a mexican who comes between them and their violences. At the end we'll discover he has  some more solid reason to want the gang's boss (very well played by Pier Paolo Capponi. Another outstanding perfornance is delivered by Umberto Raho). I also like the final line: asked by one citizen what are they supposed to do with the money, Pecos Answer is: "Build a larger cemetery". And that's that.


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« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2007, 11:07:25 PM »

I've seen the first scene of this on YouTube.  I remember it coming off as good for the first scene, but the theme song is a total knock-off of the Byrd's version of House of the Rising Sun.

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Banjo
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« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2007, 01:36:38 AM »

You mean The Animals Silenzio!

I watched it once,i'm sure i was that impressed either, but will give it another look.

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« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2007, 07:34:04 AM »

You mean The Animals Silenzio!


Oh damn! What was I thinking!

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« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2007, 01:00:36 PM »

Saw this about 5 months ago and the thing I remember the most was there are a few female beauties with large bosoms in it.

The opening sequence, while good, doesn't make much sense. I can't wrap my head around a nasty gunfighter giving away his only pistol to a lonely stranger.

The movie seems to take place in two sets (interior saloon and side street) with a side adventure out in what looks to be a construction yard posing as a desert.

The final reveal feels tacked-on and doesn't even come complete with a flashback.

Can't remember any spinning wheel but I do seem to remember some pretty brutal violence going on such as when the gang of bandits kills a doublecrosser.

Woods is passable in the role of the Mexican peon.

Average stuff mostly (which is strange because many reviews of this consider it a classic).

I hear the light hearted sequel ("Pecos Cleans Up") is something to stay away from.

« Last Edit: May 13, 2007, 01:03:50 PM by The Firecracker » Logged



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« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2007, 03:36:13 PM »

Saw this about 5 months ago and the thing I remember the most was there are a few female beauties with large bosoms in it.


 Shocked

tsk. tsk. What would Sonny think? 

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Banjo
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« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2007, 06:06:12 PM »


Oh damn! What was I thinking!

You were just testing us weren't you? Grin

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« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2007, 06:16:04 PM »

Everybody seems to like this, can't see why. It was a huge success in Italy but I haven't seen it at the time: maybe because it was restricted (there are some violent scenes)? I don't like the lead (strangely Woods is very wooden here, even in his use of the body: I like him in Franco's movies, though), the story is very basic with no touch of inventiveness. The only spurt of creativity is the spinning wheel used for I won't tell you what : but the director doesn't know what a camera is and where to put it: and the scene comes off absolutely ludicrous.
The story is about a gang of outlaws being stolen of the booty  from a stagecoach heist and terrorising a (ghost?) small town (they hadn't money for extras, evidently) called Houston trying to recover it. Pecos is a mexican who comes between them and their violences. At the end we'll discover he has  some more solid reason to want the gang's boss (very well played by Pier Paolo Capponi. Another outstanding perfornance is delivered by Umberto Raho). I also like the final line: asked by one citizen what are they supposed to do with the money, Pecos Answer is: "Build a larger cemetery". And that's that.
I just watched it again and yes it is a bit basic,quite slow moving but i really like the Pecos character and with his gammy eye Woods looks totally unlike  anything else i've seen him in.Yes the spinning wheel scene was inventive and i agree this could've been better done.
Still i'd say this is slightly above average.Its a mean moody non-nonsense western and its good to see Woods playing the ruthless Mexican,and the musical score  is very good too.
My rating 6.5 out of 10.

Oh yes a piece of trivia for you,the closing shot features a cutting from the opening scene of FAFDM.

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iceman
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« Reply #14 on: June 29, 2007, 07:56:50 PM »

P.S. The soundtrack/theme song was by LUIS BACALOV.

According to the IMDB the music was by .....Coriolano Gori     (as Lallo Gori)


ICE

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