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: Une corde, un Colt... aka Cemetery Without Crosses (1969)  ( 44944 )
Spikeopath
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« #120 : February 24, 2017, 03:29:30 PM »

Just adding my own review to the mix. No requirement for anyone to read and comment. Especially irate Italian guys.  ;)

The Black Glove Man.

Une corde, un Colt (AKA: Cemetery Without Crosses) is directed by Robert Hossein, who also stars and co-writes the screenplay with Dario Argento and Claude Desailly. Starring alongside Hossein are Michèle Mercier, Anne-Marie Balin, Daniele Vargas, Guido Lollobrigida and Serge Marquand. Music is by Andre Hossein and cinematography by Henri Persin.

After being forced to watch the lynching of her husband by the ruthless Rogers family, Maria Caine (Mercier) asks her inept brothers-in-law for help in retribution. Getting no joy from the pair, she seeks outside help in the form of fast gun Manuel (Hossein), a loner living in solitude out at a ghost town...

It's dedicated to Sergio Leone, who directs one of the best scenes in the film, contains the Argento factor, so it's not really a shock to proclaim that Leone's influence is all over Hossein's movie.

It's a Pasta Western that operates in the void between the real and the spirit world, deliberately ethereal in tone, even sprinkling dashes of the surreal onto the hearty portion. Dialogue is used sparingly, but not to the detriment of film's quality, and Hossein the director dallies in black and white staging, slow zooms and excellent usage of sound effects.

Much like the dialogue, the violence is pared down, there's no Blunderbuss infused blood laden approach to the evil that men do here, it's all very controlled and in keeping with the tonal flows that Hossein favours. The cliché's of the sub-genre are adhered to throughout, thankfully so, while the finale is suitably melancholic.

Thoughtful, sombre and ripe with blurry ambiguity, Cemetery Without Crosses is comfortably recommended to the Euro Western fan. 8/10

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« #121 : February 24, 2017, 03:40:52 PM »

I like it's soundtrack too.


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« #122 : February 26, 2017, 10:33:41 AM »

Une corde, un Colt (AKA: Cemetery Without Crosses) is directed by Robert Hossein, who also stars and co-writes the screenplay with Dario Argento...

If I remember correctly, Hossein has said that Argento wasn't really involved and isn't mentioned in the French credits.

Thoughtful, sombre and ripe with blurry ambiguity, Cemetery Without Crosses is comfortably recommended to the Euro Western fan. 8/10

Probably my favorite non-Leone Spaghetti Western. Now you need to watch Hossein's "The Taste of Violence" which is very similar in style and tone.

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« #123 : February 26, 2017, 12:30:47 PM »

If I remember correctly, Hossein has said that Argento wasn't really involved and isn't mentioned in the French credits.



As far as I remember, according to Hossein, Argento had nothing to do with it.


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« #124 : February 27, 2017, 12:18:00 PM »

If I remember correctly, Hossein has said that Argento wasn't really involved and isn't mentioned in the French credits.

Probably my favorite non-Leone Spaghetti Western. Now you need to watch Hossein's "The Taste of Violence" which is very similar in style and tone.

IMDb has Argento listed as - Dario Argento   ...   (dialogue) (italian version). That to me now seems a bit spurious as a credit! Be nice to have an Argenrto enthusiast around to find out exactly what input (if any) was there. Thanks for letting me know  O0

Noted with thanks for The Taste of Violence  O0 O0


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« #125 : June 20, 2018, 06:59:58 PM »

A rare (but justisfied  ;) ) negative review from Arizona Colt :-

CEMETERY WITHOUT CROSSES however, I found a bit overrated. I did enjoy it I just don't see what the fuss is about. I liked the gloomy atmosphere and sense of dread especially the howling wind in many scenes but the film seems to drag on much longer than its 85 minute running time. Dario Argento must've had GREAT SILENCE on his mind when he wrote this. Good film just not what I expected.

BINGO.  The director made this the year after Corbucci made The Great Silence.  Let me back up.  Its a good but flawed film.  The problem is its The Great Silence redone with a little bit of For A Few Dollars More thrown in.  The Great Silence is a film that you cannot redo in any way without coming off as pretentious. Its just HARD to redo that in any way.  No, you CANNOT redo that film.  Thats why Tarintino chose elements of the film but not the script itself when he made the Hateful Eight. 

My other problem is the similarity to For A Few Dollars More. I would've went in another direction than the one he chose to infiltrate the gang like Clint did in his film.  The Caine brothers were fabulous with their guns. I would've wrote the film to incorporate the three of them taking on the Rodgers without the drawn out play of the kidnapping, etc.  There are some great things about this film though.  The opening chase was just down right superb.  The casting was perfect.  The camera work was fantastic with the MAJOR exception of the ping pong scene ( the back and forth camera shots of Manuel and his ex girlfriend). It came across as very gimmicky.  The film hadn't earned that shot. The score was good but early on seemed rushed and out of place ( the uptempo score).

Overall I give this a 7 out of 10...

« : June 20, 2018, 07:14:30 PM moorman »
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« #126 : June 21, 2018, 04:38:24 AM »

BINGO.  The director made this the year after Corbucci made The Great Silence.  Let me back up.  Its a good but flawed film.  The problem is its The Great Silence redone with a little bit of For A Few Dollars More thrown in. 

I don't see much connections to TGS, neither to FAFDM.

And btw it was most liekly already shot in 68. In several books Une corde, un Colt is named as a 68 film, which indicates that the film was shot that year.

The release date is only about half a year after TGS in May 69.


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« #127 : June 21, 2018, 09:26:28 AM »

I don't see much connections to TGS, neither to FAFDM.

And btw it was most liekly already shot in 68. In several books Une corde, un Colt is named as a 68 film, which indicates that the film was shot that year.

The release date is only about half a year after TGS in May 69.

Clint smoked LOTS of cigars. There is hardly a scene that Manuel isn't puffing on one.  Clint joined Indio's gang under the guise of helping them by breaking their gang member out of jail.  Manuel joined the Rogers gang under the guise of helping them in that bar. Clint had a wrist cuff which was his signature. Manuel had a glove which was his signature.  Robert even threw in a musical watchbox.

The Great Silence was filmed in 1967.  Robert had almost a year to find out what that script was all about.   Both have a widow that hires someone to get revenge. Both have themes of dark tones with no winners.  Both have the widow die. Both have the protagonist die at the end.  The only thing different that Robert did was SEPERATE the widow's death from Manuel's.  I think its clear that Robert got his ideas from both Leone and Corbucci.

« : June 21, 2018, 10:55:06 AM moorman »
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« #128 : June 21, 2018, 11:47:54 AM »

That's all too vague for me. The similarities are all nothing special, things you don't need to steal from others.

And that a director gets his ideas from a script from an unreleased film is ... well ... extremely vague.

I have watched all 3 films quite often, and I never got the feeling to watch a clone from the other 2 films.

And btw plots are anyway not that important, and the story is not what makes Une Corde un colt so unique, but the directing. And here makes Hossein his own thing.

« : June 22, 2018, 11:46:10 AM stanton »

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« #129 : June 21, 2018, 01:34:28 PM »

... and the story is not what makes Une Corde un colt so unique, but the directing. And here makes Hossein his own thing.

That is absolutely the case (regardless of how valid the other comments above may or may not be)

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« #130 : June 21, 2018, 02:05:50 PM »

SILENZIO was not filmed in 1967.



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« #131 : June 21, 2018, 02:51:31 PM »

SILENZIO was not filmed in 1967.

It was released in 1968 but filmed in 1967. Alex Cox says it was filmed in 1967,   https://vimeo.com/50101903   Cox spoke with Vonetta Mcgee about The Great Silence AND directed her in Repo Man. If anyone knows when The Great Silence was filmed,  it has to be Alex Cox...


« : June 21, 2018, 02:57:53 PM moorman »
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« #132 : June 23, 2018, 07:22:19 AM »

Alex is nice, he wrote me a nice note about my PASSION & POETRY...

However, anybody who is into film history will confirm to you that remembering after 20,30, 40 years is most difficult - especially
for movie people, who wander from one film to the next...
Even Corbucci himself remembered it wrong. In his autobiography he writes that the film was shot after GLI SPECIALISTI,
because (Producer) Dorfmann was impressed by that film's success. Which he remembered wrong of course, GLI
was shot even after MERCENARIO...
Anyway, from what I researched for my SILENZIO audio-commentary SILENZIO was shot in late winter (exteriors)/ early spring (studio) 1968.
One can also see it in the WESTERN ALL'ITALIANA documentary, which was shot approx. February - April 1968 (it ends
with the early production of OUATITW which was shot around April - June '68, posters he filmed in Rome depict films released in March...)



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« #133 : June 23, 2018, 11:29:26 AM »

Alex is nice, he wrote me a nice note about my PASSION & POETRY...

However, anybody who is into film history will confirm to you that remembering after 20,30, 40 years is most difficult - especially
for movie people, who wander from one film to the next...
Even Corbucci himself remembered it wrong. In his autobiography he writes that the film was shot after GLI SPECIALISTI,
because (Producer) Dorfmann was impressed by that film's success. Which he remembered wrong of course, GLI
was shot even after MERCENARIO...
Anyway, from what I researched for my SILENZIO audio-commentary SILENZIO was shot in late winter (exteriors)/ early spring (studio) 1968.
One can also see it in the WESTERN ALL'ITALIANA documentary, which was shot approx. February - April 1968 (it ends
with the early production of OUATITW which was shot around April - June '68, posters he filmed in Rome depict films released in March...)

Very enlightening response. Thanx.  Getting back to Alex.  Alex said that The Great Silence was filmed in late 1967 and from your research, early 1968.  My point is that Robert had enough time to see that script IF thats actually what happened.  There is too much similarity there for it not to be the case.  As far as the comparison to A Few Dollars More its obvious from Robert himself and his acknowledgment of Sergio Leone that he borrowed ideas from that film.   

Let me say this also.  I'm not nick picking Robert for borrowing any ideas from other directors. They all do that.  What I'm nick picking is that some films are so iconic and different that you cannot touch them. The Great Silence is one of them.  All Westerns have the same elements in one form or another.  Also, if you borrow from another director, do it RIGHT.  That ping pong of the camera scene where Robert bounced back and forth between his character and his ex girlfriend's character came across as very gimmicky.  Leone did it right.  Finally,  Robert's film is GOOD. Its not a bad film.  Its just that it comes across to me as Sergio Leone and Sergio Corbucci lite and thats not a bad thing because Robert's film is still better than 2/3rds of the sphagetti westerns that were made.

« : June 23, 2018, 11:47:44 AM moorman »
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« #134 : June 23, 2018, 03:08:50 PM »

Check out Day Of The Outlaw if you haven't yet


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
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