Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 16, 2018, 03:38:04 PM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Films of Sergio Leone
| |-+  Other Films (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Une corde, un Colt... aka Cemetery Without Crosses (1969)
0 and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
: Une corde, un Colt... aka Cemetery Without Crosses (1969)  ( 45814 )
moorman
Gunslinger
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 211



« #135 : June 23, 2018, 05:29:41 PM »

Check out Day Of The Outlaw if you haven't yet

I saw the LAST scene of that and have always intended to go back and watch the whole movie. I will do that and give a review. Thanx...

stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3146



« #136 : June 24, 2018, 03:01:42 PM »

Check out Day Of The Outlaw if you haven't yet

Don't say TGS is a remake of that one.

But I'm sure Corbucci knew Day Of The Outlaw. Took some of it's atmosphere (and especially the costumes), transformed it ...


stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3146



« #137 : June 24, 2018, 03:17:52 PM »

Very enlightening response. Thanx.  Getting back to Alex.  Alex said that The Great Silence was filmed in late 1967 and from your research, early 1968.  My point is that Robert had enough time to see that script IF thats actually what happened.  There is too much similarity there for it not to be the case.  As far as the comparison to A Few Dollars More its obvious from Robert himself and his acknowledgment of Sergio Leone that he borrowed ideas from that film.   


Of course directors take things from other films, borrow ideas, or even steal them. I have no problem with that. Even when they steal, as long as they steal good. But the connections you make with TGS are too common to make much sense. And that a French director had read an Italian screenplay from a then not well known director, who made mostly minor films, is extremely far fetched.

And I still have no idea why you compare both films so close. I still don't think that they have much in common.

The things Hossein maybe took from FaFDM are maybe indeed taken from Leone, but even then they are so differently used that I see more differences than similarities. E.g. Eastwood's smoking underlines his coolness, while Hossein's smoking is nothing of that.

When I watch A Stranger in Town, yes, than it is obvious that without Fod this would most likely never have been made. But it is still more than a mere copy though.


moorman
Gunslinger
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 211



« #138 : June 24, 2018, 03:36:00 PM »

Of course directors take things from other films, borrow ideas, or even steal them. I have no problem with that. Even when they steal, as long as they steal good. But the connections you make with TGS are too common to make much sense. And that a French director had read an Italian screenplay from a then not well known director, who made mostly minor films, is extremely far fetched.

And I still have no idea why you compare both films so close. I still don't think that they have much in common.

The things Hossein maybe took from FaFDM are maybe indeed taken from Leone, but even then they are so differently used that I see more differences than similarities. E.g. Eastwood's smoking underlines his coolness, while Hossein's smoking is nothing of that.

When I watch A Stranger in Town, yes, than it is obvious that without Fod this would most likely never have been made. But it is still more than a mere copy though.

At the end of the day, to me The Great Silence is a excellent film and Robert's film is pretty good in its own right.  Like you said, whether you take, borrow or steal from another director, make sure its GOOD, lol.  I could be totally wrong and what I'm seeing could be coincidence.  Doesn't really matter in the end...

stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3146



« #139 : June 25, 2018, 01:14:48 AM »

Wise words.
But I value Hossein more than you do, Une Corde is a film which gets better with every viewing. One of the 10 best Spags, and I prefer it slightly to FoD or FaFDM or Django.

TGS is a very underrated film, maybe because Corbucci made too much crap, filmed too often under his possibilities. But in his best films he made very daring films with some brilliant directing. Leone's weaker films are now praised world wide for the simple fact that they were made by Leone, while Corbucci is a director only known by insiders.

But that happens all the time in art history.


Novecento
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1706



« #140 : June 26, 2018, 11:15:56 AM »

Even Corbucci himself remembered it wrong. In his autobiography he writes that the film was shot after GLI SPECIALISTI,
because (Producer) Dorfmann was impressed by that film's success. Which he remembered wrong of course, GLI
was shot even after MERCENARIO...

Are you referring to his autobiography in the volume edited by Caldiron? I can't seem to find the comment about Dorfmann. I see that Corbucci talks about Django, Navajo Joe and Gli specialisti as a set: "Django era un film contro il razzismo e l'intolleranza, Navajo Joe era un film contro il genocidio degli indiani, Gli specialisti era un film contro lo sopraffazione del ricchi" (p.80) after which he then talks about The Great Silence in the context of Django's continuing success: "Cominciavo ad essere un po' stanco di questo tipo di film, perché in breve tempo ne avevo fatti sei. I francesi mi chiesero di fare un altro western, sempre in coproduzione, con un attore che mi era molto amico, Jean-Louis Trintignant" (p.82). I think it's a little ambiguous (What specifically are the six westerns he is counting? Does he mean "another French western" or just "another western" that this time was requested by the French), and thematically he appears to be clumping Gli specialisti before The Great Silence, but I don't think he is saying that it actually was shot before.

« : June 26, 2018, 11:17:56 AM Novecento »
moorman
Gunslinger
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 211



« #141 : June 26, 2018, 02:08:09 PM »

Wise words.
But I value Hossein more than you do, Une Corde is a film which gets better with every viewing. One of the 10 best Spags, and I prefer it slightly to FoD or FaFDM or Django.

TGS is a very underrated film, maybe because Corbucci made too much crap, filmed too often under his possibilities. But in his best films he made very daring films with some brilliant directing. Leone's weaker films are now praised world wide for the simple fact that they were made by Leone, while Corbucci is a director only known by insiders.

But that happens all the time in art history.

Everything you said is true.  Its exactly the reason why Leone is known and he is not.  In fact, If Corbucci JUST made TGS, Django and maybe the Mercenary, his name would've been more known because it would've been attached to better work.  Django is not a bad film either.  My only problem with the Mercenary is I don't particularly like the lighter themed sphagetti westerns.

As far as Robert's film, i believe I will like it more and more over time.  I liked it the first time but I kept comparing it to those other two films I mentioned.

stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3146



« #142 : June 27, 2018, 04:31:29 AM »

I think under its light looking surface The Mercenary is as cynical as TGS and Django. And also similar violent, even if not everything is visible.
And just like in TGS he plays with the audience's expectations, and where TGS does not end like expected Il mercenario does not end where it is expected, and Corbucci does this 2 times, and by this series of endings turns the film's content from head to toe, from a positive ending to a pessimistic one.

For me Il mercenario is doubtless together with TGS Corbucci's masterpiece, and the 3rd and 4th best Spagie,  after the 2 by that other director (which name I just can't remember).


Jordan Krug
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 603


Crazy bellringer was right....


« #143 : June 27, 2018, 03:57:24 PM »

I think under its light looking surface The Mercenary is as cynical as TGS and Django. And also similar violent, even if not everything is visible.
And just like in TGS he plays with the audience's expectations, and where TGS does not end like expected Il mercenario does not end where it is expected, and Corbucci does this 2 times, and by this series of endings turns the film's content from head to toe, from a positive ending to a pessimistic one.

For me Il mercenario is doubtless together with TGS Corbucci's masterpiece, and the 3rd and 4th best Spagie,  after the 2 by that other director (which name I just can't remember).

The only issue I have with the mercenary is some of the editing, it's a little sloppy in places.

cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13195


easy come easy go


« #144 : June 27, 2018, 05:50:08 PM »

I think under its light looking surface The Mercenary is as cynical as TGS and Django. And also similar violent, even if not everything is visible.
And just like in TGS he plays with the audience's expectations, and where TGS does not end like expected Il mercenario does not end where it is expected, and Corbucci does this 2 times, and by this series of endings turns the film's content from head to toe, from a positive ending to a pessimistic one.

For me Il mercenario is doubtless together with TGS Corbucci's masterpiece, and the 3rd and 4th best Spagie,  after the 2 by that other director (which name I just can't remember).

You know I just re-watched most of the Zapata Westerns, and the one that I've upped my estimation of the most this go round was Damiano Damiani's A Bullet For The General, he should have made more Westerns.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3146



« #145 : June 28, 2018, 04:22:53 AM »

The only issue I have with the mercenary is some of the editing, it's a little sloppy in places.

Where?


: 1 ... 8 9 [10]  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.06116