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Author Topic: Un esercito di cinque uomini aka The Five Man Army (1969)  (Read 12234 times)
Arizona Colt
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« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2008, 07:29:56 PM »

I thought it was just average at best. Very disappointed in this one but the performances were good. I was very surprised how much I enjoyed Peter Graves here as I didn't expect much from him before watching. What hurt the experience for me was I was expecting a bigger movie than this. Considering the title I was looking forward to a big battle at the end but instead the "Five Man Army" shoots down a few soldiers before double crossing each other. The revered actor Tetsuro Tamba was a nice addition to the casting and I guess his silent character may have been down to the language barrier but it works just the same.

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« Reply #16 on: May 26, 2008, 08:25:26 PM »

By average you mean 5-6/10?

Well yes, it's nothing spectacular (as the title would suggest), I agree. Maybe it's the nostalgia for me.

I found Peter Graves to be the weakest of them, even weaker than Bud Spencer (who is the next in line). The character he plays, from how I understand it, is supposed to be something between Hannibal Smith and Major Reisman, but he obviousely fails in the task, since you can't see why this group of outlaws is following him.

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« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2008, 09:30:42 PM »

By average you mean 5-6/10?


I guess if I were to apply a rating that would suffice. I enjoyed it, but not as much as I'd hoped. It's not a SW I'd watch frequently nor recommend to a newbie. Great score, though.

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« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2008, 10:22:58 PM »

The railroad stuff was quite dubious, you realy can't do what they did and make it invisable to the egineer, he would see the switch.

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« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2008, 11:27:34 AM »

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The railroad stuff was quite dubious, you realy can't do what they did and make it invisable to the egineer, he would see the switch.

 The Dutchman had a gun to the head of the engineer supporting the government.  The other man in the locomotive, the supporter of the revolution who must have been shot soon after, is up there with him too.

  My favorites have always been Capt. Augustus, Luis, and Samurai.  Augustus' monologue before the train robbery about the changing times and how they're all going to be killed during the heist is a great scene, supported beautifully by Morricone's score.

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« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2009, 12:37:34 PM »

I recently bought the  FSM soundtrack - another morricone classic - so i naturally wanted to see the film.
A very entertaining Western
One of the good points is it is not dubbed - it is an original English language film
So, should it be classified as a "Spag"?

check it out!

btw the train heist was later copied by the US tv show BANACEK (the first ep iirc)

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« Reply #21 on: December 08, 2009, 05:37:20 PM »

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The Dutchman had a gun to the head of the engineer supporting the government.  The other man in the locomotive, the supporter of the revolution who must have been shot soon after, is up there with him too.

So what was then the point of trying to camouflage the switch?Huh

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« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2010, 06:47:19 PM »

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It is something between ''The Professionals'' and ''The Magnificent Seven'', done in Italian SW style. The story rotates around a bunch of colorful characters preparing for a train robbery. The characters are a bit cliched, yes, but this is a movie made for entertainment after all, so it doesn't really matter. Peter Graves plays the Dutchman, father figure to all the others, classic pack leader, Lee Marvin wannabe, but offers the weakest performance. Obviously gray hair isn't enough to effectively play an authoritative role. Bud Spencer plays his classic role - the ''not so bright bruiser'' (called Mesito in this movie), Nino Castelnuovo is Luis Dominguez, the fast on tongue and guns restless bouncer, James Daly is Capt. Nicolas Augustus, the old and tired dynamite expert, and finally there is the quiet, disciplined and trusty Oriental, martial arts master - Samurai (played by Tetsuro Tamba). All in all, an interesting band of individuals, enough to make you sit through 100 minutes of their adventures.

There is a particular scene when the 'army' is eating together, that I remember from when I was a kid. They're practically diving in beans and other sort of classic western/Mexican food. I could watch it just for that.

Well apparently hit in the head by a heavy wave of nostalgia I gave this 7-something the first time around, which was immensely generous. 5.5, maybe 6 tops. Mediocre entertainment, some fun moments, a lot of nonsense.

Peter Graves died a few months ago. R.I.P.

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« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2016, 11:54:56 PM »

I just saw this movie on TCM.

Firstly, I should point out that I have seen very few non-Leone spags. I've seen Death Rides a Horse, Django, The Mercenary, and The Big Gundown. Also A Man Called Sledge. And a few Westerns from that era that perhaps are not spags but very spag-inspired. But I have not seen many non-Leone spags. The non-Leone spags seem to take Leone's outrageousness to a whole new crazy level of outrageousness.

I enjoyed this movie. It's pure entertainment, you can't worry about how realistic it would be; I saw some discussion earlier in this thread about how could they have done this or that. Whatever. You can't worry too much about that. This movie is good entertainment. I give it a 7.5/10.

Btw, what's the point of a separate Zapata Westerns thread? We have a separate thread for every AW and SW that we have discussed, linked to in the AW and SW index, respectively. Whether a particular AW or SW can also be considered in the "Zapata Westerns" sub-category, bottom line is that each Western has its own thread that is linked to in either the AW Index or SW Index. So what is the separate "Zapata Westerns" thread for?

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« Reply #24 on: July 24, 2016, 10:59:54 AM »

So what is the separate "Zapata Westerns" thread for?

And what's the point of people still posting reviews of westerns in the powerrr's general thread instead of this board?

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« Reply #25 on: July 24, 2016, 04:36:04 PM »

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Btw, what's the point of a separate Zapata Westerns thread? We have a separate thread for every AW and SW that we have discussed, linked to in the AW and SW index, respectively. Whether a particular AW or SW can also be considered in the "Zapata Westerns" sub-category, bottom line is that each Western has its own thread that is linked to in either the AW Index or SW Index. So what is the separate "Zapata Westerns" thread for?

To separate them out of course.  Roll Eyes

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« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2016, 05:37:04 PM »

To separate them out of course.  Roll Eyes

If you want to separate the Zapata Westerns, why not put those threads in a separate index?

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« Reply #27 on: July 30, 2016, 06:09:50 PM »

The excellent Morricone score and the GBU-style title sequence are really what elevate this film out of mediocrity. Like The Professionals (which could use a better score than the disappointingly traditional one supplied by Maurice Jarre), the film would have more impact if it wasn't so soft-centred, a defect epitomised by the all too clean-cut Peter Graves.

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« Reply #28 on: July 31, 2016, 04:25:05 AM »

The excellent Morricone score and the GBU-style title sequence are really what elevate this film out of mediocrity. Like The Professionals (which could use a better score than the disappointingly traditional one supplied by Maurice Jarre), the film would have more impact if it wasn't so soft-centred, a defect epitomised by the all too clean-cut Peter Graves.

Really?

I remember it as a comparatively routine Morricone score, while the one from the Professionals is pretty good one. And not really a traditional one.

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« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2016, 05:10:03 AM »

Well I guess it's a matter of musical taste. I think the Five Man Army score is terrific, up there with his work for Leone. Whereas Jarre's Professionals score adheres far more closely to the old 'American heroic' template, more musically 'narrow' than the rich stew of sounds served up by Morricone.

But each to his own...

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