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Author Topic: The Guns  (Read 18953 times)
Harmonica
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« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2005, 09:51:00 AM »

Looks like Hanley beat me to the punch but I totally concur with what Hanley says above.  Concord, feel free to jump in here at any time… Wink

Leone has taken an 1866 Winchester Yellowboy and “cut it down” to look like an 1860 Henry Goldenboy.  The Henry is loaded from a slit located towards the muzzle end of the tubular magazine under the barrel.  The Winchester is loaded by a slit located on the right side of the receiver which Clint does a pretty good job of hiding during the shooting scenes but is still visible several times while shooting.  The Winchester has a “ring” that holds the wooden fore stock or handle to the magazine and barrel.  As you can see were the prop masters have removed the wooden fore stock the top half of the ring still remains on Blondie’s weapon and it does indeed look to me as if a scope has been added to the left side of the gun to make it look like the remainder of the ring has a use for securing the scope to the gun.  The Winchester also had a ring that attaches the magazine to the barrel at the muzzle of the gun.  The Henry has no such ring.  Also, the Henry's, as far as I know, had an octagonal barrel not a round one.



The top two guns are '60 Henry's and the bottom gun is a '66 Winchester.  I have circled the loading gate on the Winchester which you can clearly see in a few of the scenes below.  I also circled the strap the attaches the wooden fore stock to the barrel and the strap that attaches the barrel to the magazine on the Henry.



The loading gate on the "cut down" Winchester.



The "cut down" strap that at one time attached the wooden fore stock to the barrel.



The front stap that attaches the barrel to the magazine on the Winchester.  No such strap on the Henry.



A clear shot of "the thing" on the left side of the gun...



Not exactly the same but here is an image of a scope of the time period that looks very similar.  Although Blondies scope looks to be copper this one is brass.



Another good shot of "the thing".



Clearly you can see the sunlight reflecting off glass in these two shots which leads me to belive that it is indeed a scope of some sort...




As far as Clint’s shooting is concerned he is ambidextrous.  In several movies he shoots a rifle left handed and in others right.  In real life he is more prone to use his left.  As you can see in some of the scenes if you watch real closely he is not being real careful as to taking the shot, almost shooting from the hip so to speak.  In fact a lot of the times he actually closes his eyes right before he pulls the trigger which is a big no no for sharp shooters.  Maybe Blondie is just that good with a gun… Grin

« Last Edit: November 26, 2005, 09:54:42 AM by Harmonica » Logged

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Juan Miranda
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« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2005, 10:34:33 AM »

Well that seems pretty conclusive then, and all interesting stuff. I accidently deleted two of my photobucket captures, but never mind.

Was Blondie any where near the grassy knoll on that cold November day...

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Harmonica
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« Reply #32 on: November 26, 2005, 11:02:21 AM »


Was Blondie any where near the grassy knoll on that cold November day...


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« Reply #33 on: November 27, 2005, 11:43:39 AM »

cool shots thanks for clearing it up, my irst hunch was right.  Cool

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« Reply #34 on: November 27, 2005, 03:04:23 PM »

Yes, well done all. I guess it makes sense in retrospect that any kind of scope would have to be on the side of this weapon. If it was on the top, the user would have a series of red hot spent cartriges flying up their noses, as they were ejected from the top of the firing section.

Clint is so cool though, he just doesn't bother using it.

« Last Edit: November 27, 2005, 03:06:10 PM by Juan Miranda » Logged

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« Reply #35 on: November 27, 2005, 03:56:19 PM »

I had always thought the thing was the forearm of the stock moved to the top for either sighting or better  "storage" in the saddle sheath

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mnorg
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« Reply #36 on: January 06, 2006, 03:46:52 PM »

Anyone know what calibre the 1851 Colt was?

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« Reply #37 on: January 06, 2006, 08:28:17 PM »

Quote
Anyone know what calibre the 1851 Colt was?


From the Handbook of Texas online  Cool

Although Colt's Paterson enterprise failed in 1842 because of inadequate sales, his early revolvers had won the devotion of frontier Texans, particularly those of the ranger force. Appropriately, it was a former Texas Ranger, Samuel H. Walker,qv who in conjunction with the demands of the Mexican War,qv put Colt back in business to stay. In November 1846 Captain Walker, then of the United States Mounted Riflemen, opened negotiations with Colt for the production of 1,000 improved revolvers. Familiar with the shortcomings of the Paterson arm, Walker specified a substantial new design incorporating a fixed trigger with guard and a loading lever beneath the nine-inch barrel. The massive revolver mounted a six-shot cylinder chambered for a .44 caliber conical bullet; the revolver weighed an unprecedented four pounds, nine ounces. Texas Ranger John S. (Rip) Fordqv claimed the new Walker Colt pistol was as powerful as the United States Model 1841 "Mississippi" rifle.

The Walker Colt inaugurated the era of perfected revolver design and manufacture. Colt established a new factory at Hartford, Connecticut, in 1848, and Colt's Patent Fire Arms Manufacturing Company (today the Firearms Division of Colt Industries) began regular production. By the time of Colt's death in 1862, a succession of ten improved revolver models had been introduced, and some 468,000 units manufactured. Before the Civil War the most popular of these in Texas was the .36 caliber 1851 Navy model, about which traveler Frederick Law Olmstedqv observed, "Of the Colt's [Navy] we cannot speak in too high terms. . . . There are probably in Texas about as many revolvers as male adults, and I doubt if there are one hundred in the state of any other make." During the war the few Texas arms manufacturers producing revolvers-Dance Brothers,qv for instance-patterned their limited output on the Colt Dragoon and Navy models.


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« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2006, 05:21:40 AM »

I have had an excellent book for Christmas, untitle "Les armes américaines" ("American weapons"), by Dominique Venner. It's an amazing book about the old weapons (guns and winchster). All the story of this weapon are here: who manufactured, what person had etc... Very interesting.

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Le monde se divise en deux catégories: ceux qui ont un revolver chargé, et ceux qui creusent; toi tu creuses...
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