Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
September 28, 2020, 09:48:06 AM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Films of Sergio Leone
| |-+  Once Upon A Time In America (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Missing scene in OUATIA DVD
0 and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 2 [3]
: Missing scene in OUATIA DVD  ( 22417 )
Noodles_SlowStir
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 547


« #30 : October 12, 2007, 01:59:18 PM »

In reading interviews of Antonioni for another thread, I came across this statement by him that seemed to go well with the discussion of memory and cinema on this thread.  We talked about the similarities between memories and cinema.  Here he gives his perspective on the relationship between the viewer and film, and the role of memory in the actual viewing and recall of the film.  Yet another way in which memory and cinema are intertwined.  Antonioni would of made this statement before home video.... before people had the ability to watch personal copies of films over as often as they pleased.  I think there‚Äôs still quite a bit of truth in what he says about how we internalize a film and also the experience of revisiting and rewatching a film.  I thought it was interesting and kind of fit here as well....

A book is read in a few days, you keep it next to the bed, you carry it with you, you reread it.  A painting or a piece of music you enjoy all your life.  A motion picture you lose at once, or almost.  It is placed in the memory and then after only a few weeks the demolition work begins: you erase, add, change, retain the best, or retain the worst.  The film belongs to you.  And that is why, when after a few years you see the film again and you find that it is different, you might not like it anymore. ( The Architecture Of Vision, pg 106, originally from an article in Esquire 74:2, Aug 1970)

Tuco the ugly
Guest


« #31 : October 12, 2007, 02:15:44 PM »

Quote
A book is read in a few days, you keep it next to the bed, you carry it with you, you reread it.  A painting or a piece of music you enjoy all your life.  A motion picture you lose at once, or almost.  It is placed in the memory and then after only a few weeks the demolition work begins: you erase, add, change, retain the best, or retain the worst.  The film belongs to you.  And that is why, when after a few years you see the film again and you find that it is different, you might not like it anymore. ( The Architecture Of Vision, pg 106, originally from an article in Esquire 74:2, Aug 1970)
It's interesting, but I wouldn't agree with him.
Everything changes while time passes, books, music and paintings, same as movies. The interpretation lasts only for a certain period, then it changes, more or less of course, depending on many other things. But when something is really good, it's good for all times/generations, it can only change for the better..

Noodles_SlowStir
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 547


« #32 : October 12, 2007, 03:00:35 PM »

Quote
It's interesting, but I wouldn't agree with him.
Everything changes while time passes, books, music and paintings, same as movies. The interpretation lasts only for a certain period, then it changes, more or less of course, depending on many other things. But when something is really good, it's good for all times/generations, it can only change for the better..


I think I would agree that really nothing can escape the passage of time and the work of memory.  I would also agree that if you really love something the first time.....it's likely that it will hold for you.  You're right, with time, your appreciation can actually grow stronger.  Nostalgia kicks in and magnifies your appreciation.  Yet there are also times I find that I really loved a film at a particular time, and although I still like it, it seems to have less significance to me with time.  Maybe personal experiences have made it such.  Or I found something else or another film, director, screenwriter, actor that I identify more with......

I also think that there's something to what Antonioni says.  I definitely think that home video and greater access to films and information has to be factored in a little bit.  Although even with this ability to watch a film over at will, it's still different from rereading passages in a book, or listening to a piece of music over.  I would agree with him that I think memory seems to be more involved with the cinema experience....how you think of a film and create a personal significance from the experience.  That subjective element I think you see often in the discussions on the various threads of this board.  I find, speaking from my own experience, there are many times I'll see a film again, and find I think differently about it.  Could be I like it more....or I wonder why did I like it so back then.  I think one can have similar feelings about novels, perhaps music....but it does seem to be more pronounced with cinema for some reason.  I find I'm more aware of this when it happens with cinema.  No doubt that I appreciate and like cinema....this is a factor.  But I also love music.  I just find for me these kinds of variances in appreciation seem to happen more with film.   

Tuco the ugly
Guest


« #33 : October 12, 2007, 05:16:59 PM »

Quote
I think I would agree that really nothing can escape the passage of time and the work of memory.  I would also agree that if you really love something the first time.....it's likely that it will hold for you.  You're right, with time, your appreciation can actually grow stronger.  Nostalgia kicks in and magnifies your appreciation.  Yet there are also times I find that I really loved a film at a particular time, and although I still like it, it seems to have less significance to me with time.  Maybe personal experiences have made it such.  Or I found something else or another film, director, screenwriter, actor that I identify more with......

It's because there are two kinds of movies my friend; those you like/love for what they are (masterpieces, evergreens,...), and those you like/love because they remind you of something nice (you associate them with another time, or with a friend, or a woman, or an event). The second type of movies often fades away. This is, of course, individual, every person is different. (But I think most people do think this way.)

For example, there are movies that I like from when I was a kid, some of them faded away, because no matter how much I try, I simply cannot bring back the time when I first watched them. That kind of emotion cannot be revived, therefore I now don't have that feeling of greatness when I watch them. That doesn't mean they're bad movies.

« : October 12, 2007, 05:18:46 PM Tuco the ugly »
Tuco the ugly
Guest


« #34 : October 12, 2007, 05:28:09 PM »

Quote
I also think that there's something to what Antonioni says.  I definitely think that home video and greater access to films and information has to be factored in a little bit. Although even with this ability to watch a film over at will, it's still different from rereading passages in a book, or listening to a piece of music over.  I would agree with him that I think memory seems to be more involved with the cinema experience....how you think of a film and create a personal significance from the experience.  That subjective element I think you see often in the discussions on the various threads of this board.  I find, speaking from my own experience, there are many times I'll see a film again, and find I think differently about it.  Could be I like it more....or I wonder why did I like it so back then.  I think one can have similar feelings about novels, perhaps music....but it does seem to be more pronounced with cinema for some reason.  I find I'm more aware of this when it happens with cinema.  No doubt that I appreciate and like cinema....this is a factor.  But I also love music.  I just find for me these kinds of variances in appreciation seem to happen more with film.   
There certainly is something to his words.
I agree that it's not the same today, when you can watch whatever you want, whenever you want. Before people could watch movies only on television or in theatres, the result was a more subjective experience, harder to preserve as time passes.
This can be the reason for what I said in my previous post.

: 1 2 [3]  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.06796