Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 18, 2017, 09:49:37 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Films of Sergio Leone
| |-+  Other Films (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  The Great Silence aka Il grande silenzio (1968)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 18 19 [20] 21 22 ... 24 Go Down Print
Author Topic: The Great Silence aka Il grande silenzio (1968)  (Read 98953 times)
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #285 on: October 03, 2012, 07:29:08 AM »

Yeah, the Japs love their "macaroni Westerns."

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Novecento
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1551



View Profile
« Reply #286 on: October 13, 2012, 10:35:38 AM »

On Amazon.co.jp, Django is listed as 1080p, but The Great Silence as only 1080i  Shocked

Logged
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #287 on: October 13, 2012, 04:27:31 PM »

 Shocked Shocked Shocked

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12785


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #288 on: January 22, 2013, 08:17:14 PM »



Neo Noir Western The Great Silence. You just need tone down your overly inquisitive brain, and watch it's images of the barren snow bound wilderness of 1898 Snow Hill play out, and you'll better enjoy the the sightly off kilter stylistic Neo Noir Western world that Corbucci creates. Corbucci utilizes the bleak alpine landscape to the maximum, creating an atmosphere of desolation and despair that cilngs and haunts you long after its over.





<spoilers below>

Directed by Sergio Corbucci starring Jean-Louis Trintignant, Klaus Kinski, Vonetta McGee and Frank Wolff, with (Sergio Leone staples) Luigi Pistilli and Mario Brega, and also Marisa Merlini. Writing credits Mario Amendola, Bruno Corbucci, Sergio Corbucci, and Vittoriano Petrilli.

Klaus Kinski


Trintignant


Kinsky as Loco the bounty hunter oozes menace, the leader of a bunch of human buzzards, a bizarre grotesque reaper of the minor renegade/cultists/outlaws that inhabit the back country and control the passes into Snow Hill, a stage stop on the road to nowhere. Trintignant is Silence a hired gun who is summoned to Snow Hill by Pauline (Vonnetta McGee) the comely wife of a recently shot outlaw who wants revenge against Loco. She tries to borrow $1000 dollars from general store proprietor/banker/justice of the peace, Pollicut (Pistilli), the defacto town boss. He refuses and she in turn offers herself to Silence as payment. Frank Woff is the well meaning sightly buffonish new county sheriff, Burnett who with town madam Regina (Marisa Merlini) give off a Marshal Dillon-Kitty-Gunsmoke vibe.

Vonetta McGee & Trintignant




From IMDb:

Brilliant, almost surreal piece set in the white land of demons, 11 March 2003

Author: Bogey Man from Finland

The late, great Italian film maker Sergio Corbucci (Django, Companeros) directed and co-wrote this incredible western, Il Grande Silenzio (aka The Great Silence) in 1968. It is as visually impressive and powerful in its silence as the greatest work of another Sergio, Leone, but what makes Corbucci's piece stand out is its total pessimism, honesty and possibly the darkest and saddest ending ever filmed. These powerful images are fantastic themselves, but when it all is given the magic touch of Ennio Morricone's music, it becomes clear this is perhaps the greatest of all the spaghetti westerns made in Italy.

Extremely great and also handsome actor Jean-Louis Trintignant is a killer named Silence. He has a dark childhood as his family was slaughtered in front of him and his own throat was slashed as a little boy so that he could never speak again, and he doesn't. He is a killer who kills for those who have been mistreated and abused by sadistic and barbaric bounty hunters and thieves that inhabit the area, Snowhill town, sometimes in the late 1800's. Another killer arrives to Snowhill, Loco (Klaus Kinski in a truly memorable role) and he is the other side of Silence: a totally ruthless killer who betrays his friends for money and the like, but still these two men share at least one thing in common. They won't shoot until their opposite has touched his gun first so that the killing could be told as "self defense". The late US actor Frank Wolff plays the funny Sheriff Burnett who tries to uphold the law in the city. Vonetta McGee in her first feature film performance (and a character in Alex Cox' Repo Man, Cox being a huge admirer of Corbucci's film) plays Pauline, a sad big eyed, dark beauty who has lost her husband to Loco's bullet. Everyone wants revenge and everyone also gets it, but never without realistic consequences. The film won't be any more merciful than the real life it's depicting itself.  CONTINUED...


Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12785


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #289 on: January 22, 2013, 08:18:07 PM »

This belongs to the most powerful experiences I've had for a long time. The magic of silence, proved in its most beautiful and sensitive form in the art of Japanese Takeshi Kitano for example, is totally unique in this tale of the mute killer. He naturally doesn't speak a word during the whole film but still he says much more than many speaking characters here and in much less noteworthy films of any genre. The eyes, the movements, the face expressions in cinema can be much more than any words ever could and this film is a very good example to show it. Especially the love scene between Silence and Pauline is among the most beautiful scenes I've ever seen as the suffered, but still full of (fateful) hate and anger, wife of the dead man falls in love with Silence and sadly doesn't realize to give up the thoughts of revenge before it's too late. The emotions and love in that brief and silent scene are real, they are perhaps even more than some real human beings can ever achieve in their lives.

The darkest and most brutal sides of human nature are here present all the time and the things get almost surreal at times. In Il Grande Silenzio, everyone wants to avenge the wrongs they've suffered, no matter if they're themselves old, weak, strong, young or anything, they just want to answer to violence with violence and of course it never works until there's one man who'd dare to say no to his instincts and feelings of primitive hate and rage. The ending of the film is so harrowingly real (and prolonged) it becomes almost unbearable in its sadness and both mental (especially) and physical violence. Again Kinski's eyes tell everything that is necessary. At this point I'll point out that I'm definitely not talking about the alternative (and very bad) "happy ending" Corbucci was forced to shoot for some foreign audiences like the Far East and North Africa, as the producers thought they would have probably disliked the film too much in its original form and finale, THE original finale I'm talking about. Il Grande Silenzio shows our nature in its ugliest form, in a place in which one has to struggle to survive but still should remember how can we treat each other in any kind of situation. The theme of violence, greediness and overall decadence of man has never been this strong in the Italian western genre and naturally the ending broke all the conventions and rules of the genre, because this film just wants to be and is so much more.

The imagery is stunning in the wintery mountains and white heaven in hell. It is snowing all the time and the coldness of the place comes through the screen. One extremely memorable element in the exteriors is the bunch of outlaws that moves with scythes and other weapons silently around the place trying to find something to eat, like horses of some casual travellers. The silence of the group when it arrives and surrounds the camera is very haunting and as we don't really get to know where they live and stay for night, it becomes almost a surreal element and a very creepy one. Another similar elements can be found for example in British Philip Ridley's disturbing Reflecting Skin (1990) as it has the mysterious black car driving around and other unknown characters haunting the small protagonist (Jeremy Cooper) in his journey towards the (again) sad ending. Surrealism in cinema is among the things that make the art so fascinating and fantastic.

The cinematography is Corbucci's film is nothing short of mind blowing with some great compositions and different angles plus some extreme close ups to make each scene look as powerful as their potential. The white is the dominating color here (in addition to the red that is poured by the characters onto the peaceful white) and it all is captured on screen with huge talent that leaves no space for questions about Corbucci's abilities as a film maker. Also the occasional shaky shots and zooms work greatly as nothing is used too often or without reason. Everything that is there can be explained and have their reason.

Again the music by the masterful Ennio Morricone is something that can make and makes tears come to the viewer eyes when heard over the already wonderful and powerful images. Cinema just could not be any more powerful when imagery, the eyes, the faces like these and music like this give power to each other and show sides of each other that otherwise would be hidden. The music is on the same brilliant level with the music in Leone's films, but it is so sad and without any "heroic" touches in Corbucci's vision of the West.

Il Grande Silenzio is a masterpiece of Italian cinema and easily the greatest achievement of its director. It has important and serious things to tell and depict, things that are (t)here unfortunately today as they were back then, and so the film is as topical and true as it was back then and will remain so until, if ever, its target will change. The cinematic magic could not be any more fantastic than it now is, and there are no any negative sides I would consider forth mentioning in the piece at all. A masterpiece, honest, raw, beautiful, mighty cinema and thoroughly real. 10/10

 
Frank Wolff


The rock, pines, shanties, and blood sharply contrast against the white snow noir-ishly with another Morricone masterpiece of a soudtrack, and one of the bleakest endings of any Western out there.





My rating is going up, out Fargo's Fargo. 8/10.

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
mike siegel
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 889


Call me Kowalski, like the guy in Vanishing Point


View Profile WWW
« Reply #290 on: January 23, 2013, 08:32:19 AM »

I'm glad you liked it that much Smiley

I first saw it when I was 13 I guess, it had the same impact on me as
my other favorite films from 68 / 69, MIDNIGHT COWBOY, EASY RIDER, Z, WILD BUNCH ...
When film makers not only had to say something, but were able to say it ...

I thought of it yesterday, 'bought a nice Argentinian poster last night Smiley

Some of my SILENZIO memorabilia.
9 Italian photobustas / German first release poster + 18 lobby cards,
Japanese / Argentinian / French / Belgium first release posters,
German re-release posters + lc's, some b/w's, some brochures, soundtrack record.

I also attach the 35mm reference shots again. I cropped the Kinski shot
so maybe someone can compare it with DVD's etc.


Logged


New Sam Peckinpah forum online!  www.earnedinblood.com
mike siegel
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 889


Call me Kowalski, like the guy in Vanishing Point


View Profile WWW
« Reply #291 on: January 23, 2013, 08:34:43 AM »


« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 01:54:14 AM by mike siegel » Logged


New Sam Peckinpah forum online!  www.earnedinblood.com
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12785


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #292 on: January 23, 2013, 03:42:54 PM »

nice collection.

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Novecento
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1551



View Profile
« Reply #293 on: January 23, 2013, 07:59:04 PM »

nice collection.

Indeed

I also attach the 35mm reference shots again. I cropped the Kinski shot so maybe someone can compare it with DVD's etc.

Ah yes I remember that whole debate about the correct aspect ratio for this one. I Can't remember what the ultimate conclusion was however.

There were rumors of a German BD a while back, but it never materialized.

Logged
Senza
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 565


You think you're better that I am?


View Profile
« Reply #294 on: March 02, 2013, 07:47:22 PM »

I just watched the happy ending, and even though I'm a big fan/supporter of happy endings, it really ruined the movie. The sad ending where silence is shot down in slow motion is intense!

Logged

"Roll it up! Roll it up! I'll give you a good idea where you can put it!" - Tuco Benedicto Pacifico Juan Maria Ramirez
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #295 on: October 20, 2013, 08:34:25 PM »

Liked this more on a rewatch. That seems to be a trend.

Quote
Sergio Corbucci produced one of the best Spaghetti Westerns with The Great Silence (1968). Notorious for its bleak ending (Christopher Frayling claims a contemporary viewer was so incensed he fired a pistol at the theater screen!), its stylishness and creativity elevate it above most Spaghettis.

Bounty killers led by the psychotic Loco (Klaus Kinski) ravage isolated Snowhill, Utah. Their only opposition is Silence (Jean-Louis Trintigant), a mute gunslinger with a Mauser Broomhandle who sides with Loco's victims - a band of starving outlaws holed up in the mountains. One outlaw's widow (Vonetta McGee) hires Silence to kill Loco. The Sheriff Barnett (Frank Wolff) arrives in Snowhill, determined to reestablish law and order. But Silence and the Sheriff find handling Loco a tough proposition.

Corbucci shot most of Silence in Italy's Dolomite Mountains, using some Doctor Zhivago-esque trickery for the town scenes (reportedly shaving cream was employed!). He uses the setting to great effect: the snow storm isolates the town and helps drive the story, as when Barnett's uncovered pistol freezes. You can count the number of snow-covered Westerns on one hand (Day of the Outlaw? Jeremiah Johnson?), and photographer Silvano Ippoliti makes Silence a sight to behold. Helped by Ennio Morricone's somber score, it's a genuinely beautiful film.

Silence matches its unconventional setting with a devastating genre deconstruction. Silence himself pushes the Western hero to near-comic extremes: Clint Eastwood and Franco Nero barely speak, so why not make Silence mute? The character still maintains a kind of chivalry; he goads villains into drawing first, and won't shoot wounded men. Trying that on Loco, he gets roughed up for his trouble. Similarly, Sheriff Barnett is less Wyatt Earp than Old West General Gordon, sent by spineless politicians to "manage" an insolvable situation singlehanded. These conventional protagonists prove thoroughly inadequate to save Snowhill.


Similarly, Corbucci mocks the idea of frontier justice. For one, the outlaws are harmless tramps; the film implies they're persecuted Mormons. Loco receives sanction from crooked Judge Pollicutt (Luigi Pistilli), who runs Snowhill as a personal fiefdom. Utah's Governor (Carlo D'Angelo) is mainly interested in reelection; sounding a noble call for equality, he asks an aide to note it for his next speech! With capital and killers working hand in glove, "justice" becomes frontier feudalism.

In his inimitable fashion, Corbucci saturates Silence with grisly violence. Silence's favorite trick involves shooting the thumbs off bad guys so they can't shoot back. Barnett's welcomed into town when the hill outlaws kill and eat his horse. One villain gets his face scorched by burning coals. But it's all prelude to the finale, where Loco goads Silence into an impossible showdown. It's Silence's chivalry against Loco's monstrous pragmatism, the outcome preordained.

Jean-Louis Trintignant (The Conformist) is interesting casting, channeling his cerebral intensity into a wordless gunfighter. But Klaus Kinski steals the show; he makes Loco more cocky schemer than cackling lunatic, but no less frightening. Vonetta McGee gives a strong performance: unlike most Spaghetti women, she's a tough cookie whose actions drive the plot. Luigi Pistilli's (For a Few Dollars More) officious Pollicutt contrats with Kinski's amorality. Frank Wolff (Salvatore Giuliano) plays Barnett broadly, undercutting his tragic arc.

The Great Silence isn't a perfect movie. The plot's a little rough around the edges, with the outlaws' role never fully established and some passages unnecessary (the Silence-Pauline romance). But its aesthetic beauty, good acting and grim atmosphere make for an experience that's decidedly different from most Spaghetti Westerns. 8/10

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-great-silence.html

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12785


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #296 on: October 21, 2013, 06:12:59 AM »

I wrote this way back at the start of this thread:

I was thinking today about how the story may have been made a little more believable. Lets say the "gang of outlaws" who live up in the mountains walk over the top of the snow and feed on dead horses are instead a gang of cannibals who feed on dead travelers (or even kill and eat travelers) who have tried and failed to make it over the passes into Snow Hill.

That would make Klaus Kinsky and his band of bounty killers more believable, and it would make the reward offer understandable. The way its portrayed now the outlaws are just pathetic.


 Wink

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #297 on: October 21, 2013, 08:19:23 AM »

The alternative ending is one of the most hilarious deleted scenes I have ever seen. Good they didn't use it though.

In the audio commentary, they state that the editing was dictated by how many tourists you could see skiing in the background: they just selected the cleanest shots. Which is amazing since the movie really is beautiful.

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2988



View Profile
« Reply #298 on: October 21, 2013, 12:19:01 PM »

I wrote this way back at the start of this thread:

I was thinking today about how the story may have been made a little more believable. Lets say the "gang of outlaws" who live up in the mountains walk over the top of the snow and feed on dead horses are instead a gang of cannibals who feed on dead travelers (or even kill and eat travelers) who have tried and failed to make it over the passes into Snow Hill.

That would make Klaus Kinsky and his band of bounty killers more believable, and it would make the reward offer understandable. The way its portrayed now the outlaws are just pathetic.


 Wink

But they are no outlaws, they are just normal farmers turned into outlaws by an unjust law in the hands of corrupt businessman who only want to grab their land with this method.

But I see there is a smiley at the end of your post ...

Logged

Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #299 on: October 21, 2013, 05:52:35 PM »

Stanton's got it right. The whole point is that the outlaws aren't a threat. It's even hinted that the outlaws are victims of political or religious persecution rather than criminals. CJ's way would be more morally ambiguous, but I don't think Corbucci was going for ambiguity.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
Pages: 1 ... 18 19 [20] 21 22 ... 24 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.035 seconds with 19 queries.