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Author Topic: Film-Noir Discussion/DVD Review Thread  (Read 373463 times)
cigar joe
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« Reply #1470 on: May 08, 2017, 02:51:37 PM »

About the Noir Alley schedule...a lot of great films included for sure, but TCM has been showing most of them off and on for years. I'm a bit disappointed they didn't try to get some lesser-known, obscure titles. For example, there are two 1947 films that Eddie Muller's Film Noir Foundation restored and has been showing at their festivals for a couple of years. THE GUILTY and HIGH TIDE  are both  good Bs that many noir fans have not seen. There's also SHED NO TEARS and FALL GUY. In other words, how about something other than the same old stand-by titles.

I agree, they should go with some off the beaten path Noir.

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« Reply #1471 on: May 08, 2017, 03:17:22 PM »

I think there is a nice mix of classic and lesser-known noirs  Smiley

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« Reply #1472 on: May 08, 2017, 03:21:59 PM »

Noirjoe, I agree. From the ones you mention I only know Shed No Tears. It's on youtube, but a bad print. It looks as if none of them have got any restoration treatment.

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« Reply #1473 on: May 09, 2017, 09:38:04 AM »

Jessica, FALL GUY has been restored and is available from Warner Archive. THE GUILTY and HIGH TIDE have never been released on DVD and are only available on DVD-R dupes from collectors.

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« Reply #1474 on: May 16, 2017, 11:59:11 PM »

This week's Noir Alley selection was THE PROWLER. Next week is CRIME OF PASSION.

Y'all know that I love Eddie Muller, but one thing I cannot stand about him: He thinks Barbara Stanwyck was the greatest actress in the history of Hollywood. I hate watching her.

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« Reply #1475 on: May 17, 2017, 02:13:35 PM »

This week's Noir Alley selection was THE PROWLER. Next week is CRIME OF PASSION.

Y'all know that I live Eddie Muller
The hell you say. You live titoli if you live anyone.

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« Reply #1476 on: May 18, 2017, 12:20:46 AM »

Haha whoops, I meant "love." Fixed  Wink

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« Reply #1477 on: May 24, 2017, 01:40:42 AM »

The Arnelo Affair (1947) 7/10

Saw on TCM

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« Reply #1478 on: June 29, 2017, 02:13:40 AM »

You Can't Escape (1956): Author Robert Urquhart and heiress Noelle Middleton fall head over heels in love. After they announce their engagement Urquhart's ex-girlfriend shows up and tells him she's pregnant with his baby. He ends up killing her in a freak accident. When he tries to dispose of the body Middleton catches him, but after some convincing agrees to help him, and they bury her in some private woods owned by Middleton's family. However journalist Peter Reynolds, always on the lookout for a spicy story, and the dead girl's doctor Guy Rolfe, throw a spanner in the works.

A decent Britnoir that could've been better. Urquhart plays a man whose life spirals out of control after an unfortunate accident. But you never feel too sorry for him, he's too selfish and keeps telling Middleton to just forget the dead ex ever happened. Because of that event Middleton starts to see the lesser side of Urquhart and is having doubts about the marriage, while Rolfe starts to take a romantic interest in her. Meanwhile shady journalist Reynolds is also not beyond receiving bribes for not writing his story, as he can connect Urquhart to the dead girl and even figures out where he's buried her. They give good performances, but it's all too posh and polite, too stiff-upper-lip, even for a British movie. Esp Rolfe looks like he has his suits pressed while wearing them.

For both director Wilfred Eames and cinematographer Norman Warwick this would be their first movie and they do a nice job. They keep things moving at a brisk pace and there are some nice shots sprinkled throughout. As with the performances, it could've used more spunk and a higher sense of doom and dread, but all in all, not a bad way to spend 75 minutes. 6+/10

Watched this on the Network DVD. Nice, clean image, aside from the normal version (framed in 1:66) the disc also has a full-frame 1:33 version.

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« Reply #1479 on: July 31, 2017, 09:37:47 PM »

Alias Nick Beal (1949), a hard-to-see Ray Milland film, shows on Turner this Wednesday; 12am Eastern/9pm Pacific.

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« Reply #1480 on: July 31, 2017, 09:56:01 PM »

Alias Nick Beal (1949), a hard-to-see Ray Milland film, shows on Turner this Wednesday; 12am Eastern/9pm Pacific.

Thanks, I'll set my DVR  Afro

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« Reply #1481 on: August 21, 2017, 08:44:39 AM »

Arrow just announced a new film noir boxset: https://www.arrowfilms.co.uk/shop/index.php?route=product/product&keyword=four&product_id=1031

I already have Secret Beyond The Door on a French blu-ray, but no doubt will add this set to the collection.

Quote
Four Film Noir Classics: The Dark Mirror, Secret Beyond the Door, Force of Evil, The Big Combo

Format: Blu-ray + DVD
Starring:  Olivia De Havviland, Lew Ayres, Joan Bennet, Michael Redgrave, John Garfield, Richard Conte
Directed by: Robert Siodmak, Fritz Lang, Abraham Polonsky, Joseph H. Lewis
 
Synopsis:
Film noir has had many influences. Long before the term was even coined, we had atmospheric studio-shot detective thrillers, whose characters gradually became more ambiguous, and whose locations started to take in the world outside (notably New York City). This collection showcases some classic examples.

In The Dark Mirror (1946), directed by Robert Siodmak (The Killers), a man is murdered and there’s an obvious suspect, but she has an identical twin sister (both played by Olivia de Havilland, Gone with the Wind), and one of them has a cast-iron alibi. The perfect crime? A psychologist with a specialist interest in twin psychology delves into the heart of the mystery, at considerable risk to himself. In Secret Beyond the Door (1947), Fritz Lang (The Big Heat) adapts the Bluebeard legend with a dash of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca. Shortly after their marriage, Celia (Joan Bennett, Suspiria) begins to suspect her architect husband Mark (Michael Redgrave, Dead of Night) of having a secret past, and wonders about the reason behind multiple rooms in his self-designed home, one of which is kept permanently locked. In Abraham Polonsky’s Force of Evil (1948), an unscrupulous lawyer (John Garfield, The Postman Always Rings Twice) scents a personal fortune when he concocts a plan to merge New York City’s numbers rackets into a single powerful and unbreakable operation, but reckons without his brother, who’d rather stay independent. And in Joseph H. Lewis’ ultra-stylish The Big Combo (1955), Lieutenant Diamond (Cornel Wilde, The Naked Prey) is determined to bring down mob boss Mr Brown (Richard Conte, Thieves’ Highway). But Brown feels the same way, and is far less constrained by the law, leading to some wince-inducing set pieces (some involving a pre-stardom Lee Van Cleef).

This collection showcases many of the genre’s major names on both sides of the camera. In addition to the directing and acting talent mentioned above there are cinematographers Stanley Cortez (The Night of the Hunter) and John Alton (An American in Paris), composers Dmitri Tiomkin (High Noon) and Miklós Rósza (The Killers) and writers Nunnally Johnson (The Woman in the Window) and Philip Yordan (Johnny Guitar). It’s little wonder that directors such as Martin Scorsese and Quentin Tarantino were so struck by them.

LIMITED EDITION CONTENTS:

• Limited Edition Dual Format Collection [2000 copies]
• High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation of four film noir classics: The Dark Mirror (Robert Siodmak, 1946), Secret Beyond the Door (Fritz Lang, 1947), Force of Evil (Abraham Polonsky, 1948), and The Big Combo (Joseph H. Lewis, 1955)
• Commentaries on all films by leading scholars and critics Adrian Martin (on The Dark Mirror), Alan K. Rode (on Secret Beyond the Door), Glenn Kenny and Farran Smith Nehme (on Force of Evil), and Eddie Muller (on The Big Combo) • Noah Isenberg on The Dark Mirror, the author and scholar provides a detailed analysis of the film
• Noah Isenberg on The Dark Mirror, the author and scholar provides a detailed analysis of the film
• Barry Keith Grant on Secret Beyond the Door, the author and scholar introduces the film
• The House of Lang: A visual essay on Fritz Lang’s style by filmmaker David Cairns with a focus on his noir work
• Introduction to Force of Evil by Martin Scorsese
• An Autopsy on Capitalism: A visual essay on the production and reception of Force of Evil by Frank Krutnik, author of In a Lonely Street: Film noir, genre, masculinity
• Commentary on selected Force of Evil themes by Krutnik
• Geoff Andrew on The Big Combo, the critic and programmer offers an introduction to and analysis of the film
• Wagon Wheel Joe: A visual essay on director Joseph H. Lewis by filmmaker David Cairns
• The Big Combo original screenplay (BD/DVD-ROM content)
• Four radio plays, starring Olivia de Havilland and John Garfield among others
• Trailers
• Reversible sleeves featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Scott Saslow for all films
• Hardback book featuring new writing on all the films by noir experts and critics including Michael Brooke, Andrew Spicer, David Cairns and Tony Rayns, production stories, re-prints featuring Fritz Lang, Abraham Polonsky, Cornel Wilde, The Dark Mirror consultant Dr Mary Romm, contemporary reviews, and credits for all films, illustrated with original stills [Limited Edition Exclusive]


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« Reply #1482 on: August 21, 2017, 05:08:59 PM »

That sounds like a great boxset, Xh. I have all the films already, but the extras sound great. Is it Region 2?

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« Reply #1483 on: August 21, 2017, 06:44:09 PM »

Hi Jess,the DVDs are R2 but the Blu's might be Region free.With Arrow having put out R1 DVDs/Blu-Rays this year,there is a chance it will reach the US.

Reading the November line-up,these are some of the best box sets I've ever heard about! With Arrow also bringing out:

 Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years. Vol. 1 – Seijun Rising: The Youth Movies Limited Edition

Synopsis:
YOUTHS ON THE LOOSE AND REBELS WITHOUT CAUSES IN THE UNRULY SEISHUN EIGA YOUTH MOVIES OF JAPANESE ICONOCLAST SEIJUN SUZUKI

Making their home-video debuts outside Japan, this diverse selection of Nikkatsu youth movies (seishun eiga) charts the evolving style of the B-movie maverick best known for the cult classics Tokyo Drifter (1966) and Branded to Kill (1967).

The Boy Who Came Back (1958) marks the first appearances of “Nikkatsu Diamond Guys” and regular Suzuki collaborators Akira Kobayashi and Jo Shishido, with Kobayashi cast as the hot-headed hoodlum fresh out of reform school who struggles to make a clean break with his tearaway past. The Wind-of-Youth Group Crosses the Mountain Pass (1961) is a carnivalesque tale of a young student who hooks up with a down-at-heels travelling circus troupe. Teenage Yakuza (1962) stars Tamio Kawaji as the high-school vigilante protecting his community from the extortions of mobsters from a neighbouring city. The Incorrigible (1963) and Born Under Crossed Stars (1965), both based on Toko Kon’s novels about young love, represent Suzuki’s first films set in the 1920s era later celebrated in his critically-regarded Taisho Trilogy.

LIMITED EDITION CONTENTS:

• Limited Edition Dual Format Collection [3000 copies]
• High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation
• Optional English Subtitles
• New introduction to the films by critic Tony Rayns
• 60-page illustrated collector's book featuring new writing by critic and author Jasper Sharp

And...

Sacha Guitry: Four Films 1936-1938 Limited Edition

Four Films 1936-1938 brings together a quartet of 1930s features by Sacha Guitry, the celebrated French filmmaker, playwright and actor of the stage and screen, each based on his earlier works.
Indiscretions (Le Nouveau testament) follows a holier-than-though physician who is scuppered by his own hypocrisy. My Father Was Right (Mon père avait raison) tells off a man who, after being left by his wife for another man, raises his son to be wary of women. Let’s Dream (Faisons un rêve…) is another story of mistrust, between husband, wife and lovers. And the history of one of France’s most famous streets is retold in Up the Champs-Élysées (Remontons les Champs-Élysées), featuring multiple performances from Guitry himself.
Available for the first time on Blu-ray this set presents some of Guitry’s earliest and most enjoyable works.
LIMITED EDITION CONTENTS:
• Limited Edition Dual Format Collection [2000 copies]
• High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentations
• Original French mono audio (uncompressed LPCM on the Blu-ray)
• Optional English subtitles
• Two French television documentaries: Cinéastes de notre temps: Sacha Guitry (1965) and Thèmes et variations du cinéma: Guitry (1967)
• An interview with Guitry from the 1959 television series Magazine du théâtre
• 60-page limited edition book featuring new writing on the films

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« Reply #1484 on: August 22, 2017, 01:25:15 AM »

That sounds like a great boxset, Xh. I have all the films already, but the extras sound great. Is it Region 2?

Yes Region 2/B only (the flag(s) under each announcement details the country/region they're releasing it in):
https://scontent-amt2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/20992718_1164535450356450_3644400064547200646_n.jpg?oh=bf55dc131cb986f466c4db2efa94a509&oe=5A28767E

Probably also because all the films already have a recent release in the USA, so those rights are not with Arrow.

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'I feel all dead inside. I'm backed up in a dark corner and I don't know who's hitting me.' - The Dark Corner (1946)
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