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Author Topic: My first reaction to Leone (and SW)  (Read 4722 times)
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« on: July 20, 2005, 04:35:01 PM »

I must have been a littlle short of 8 when I first saw FOD. I don't think I ever jumped on the seat in my 15 years career as an addicted movie watcher, but if I ever did it was when Eastwood gets rid in a flash of the 3 goons.  I realized  that precise moment that this was another kind of stuff we'd been feeded from Hollywood. Couldn't get enough of SW from then on. There was only Connery to rival with Eastwood as my ideal hero.

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Walton
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« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2005, 01:49:36 AM »

My first Leone experience was watching For a Few Dollars More on TV in Australia when I was still in high school. I simply couldn't believe what I was seeing, especially astonishing to me was the eccentricity of the score and sound design - I vividly recall being gobsmacked at the scene where they shoot each others hats into the air, with accompanying SFX. I remember thinking that here was a western totally unlike any I'd ever seen, and I was hooked for life.

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leonehayrani
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« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2005, 10:39:28 AM »

My first was For A Few Dollars More, when I was probably about 7 or 8.  Before that, when I was 5-7, I was hooked on John Wayne westerns, but when I encountered Leone's films, there was no going back really.  I can still appreciate some othe earlier American films (especially High Noon), and even some John Wayne stuff, but aside from High Noon none of it is even close to Leone's works, and they're even inferior to the best non-Leone spaghettis.

My local TV channel would regularly have a western week with one shown at 8pm every weekday.  Unless it was a "John Wayne" week, invariably, all three Dollars films would be among them.  The others would often be other early Eastwood films like Two Mules for Sister Sara, Hang-em High, or High Plains Drifter.

I thus grew up loving the Dollars films, but at first didn't really know why, didn't know who Leone was, and didn't even know they were Italian.  It was only later as a teenager that I started to become aware of this, and how Leone's films differ from the other Clint westerns, all of which I had initially lumped together as a kid.  Eventually, I discovered other spaghettis, too, but sine we had only decent TV reception on a couple channels with our antenna, my early exposure was limited before we got VHS.

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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2005, 03:46:49 PM »

My first experience was coming home half drunk from the pub and GBU came on.  The music I recognised straightaway, but when that guys head comes up from the bottom corner of the screen to obscure the panoramic vision that was there beforehand, I knew I was hooked.  Never seen anything like it before.  Film was now entertainment and art.  A late starter.  17 or 18.

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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2005, 08:00:20 PM »

My Dad rented GBU for me when I was 10. I loved it and as a dad-daughter bonding thing we watched hundreds of western and war movies. And we read all the same history books and trade them back and forth. I guess that's why I have never gotten along with other girls, even now they think I'm too weird.

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« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2005, 04:31:03 PM »

Leone entered my life via TGTBTU, when I was 14. I very much enjoyed it but it was through OUATITW that my true recognition of him as a cinematic genius came about.  Years later and I can't get enough of him, and thanks to him, my experience of Westerns has become the much richer, with my aim to direct a grandiose version in many years to come.

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« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2005, 06:48:57 PM »

I had been getting into westerns when I was like 12 and when I was 14 I asked a relative to get me the Man With No Name trilogy on DVD. I watched those every week for a year. Then during Christmas of '03 I got OUATITW which I could care less about and then I developed a liking for it. Then in Oct. '04 I got OUATIA and it was the same way, now both of those are my favorite movies. Then in either March or April I got DYS on DVD, an import from Japan. Every month since late last year I go through all six films

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« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2005, 03:48:16 PM »

My Dad rented GBU for me when I was 10. I loved it and as a dad-daughter bonding thing we watched hundreds of western and war movies. And we read all the same history books and trade them back and forth. I guess that's why I have never gotten along with other girls, even now they think I'm too weird.
It seems there aren't so many girls or women on this board.

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« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2005, 12:05:58 PM »

My first Leone was "Nobody", when i was eight. I grew up in germany, and so i was subsequently (and previously) exposed to a lot of the Karl May ("Winnetu") sagas and the Hill/Spencer slapstick (Still love the "Trinity" movies). "Nobody" was different, i was hooked! And a bit later, OUATITW made a great impression on me (promoted by my father and two of my uncles, who also loved it).

By the way, the german dubbing of the Terrence Hill movies is so much more funny than the american versions, it definitely explains the low regard for those movies over here. Especially funny when you're a pre-teen, i guess...

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Christopher
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« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2005, 08:57:03 AM »

I don't remember how old I was when I saw A Fistful of Dollars, which I think was my first. Some years back, TBS, an American station, used to show an Eastwood movie and a John Wayne movie every Saturday night. They showed A Fistful of Dollars one week, and For a Few Dollars More than next. Then, I think the first time I saw The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly was during one of those "24 Hours of Eastwood" marathons, which were always the day after Thanksgiving.

I know I was at least five when I started watching Eastwood, so these films came several years after that. Hang 'em High was the first western I ever saw.

Actually, when I was pretty young I remember seeing the end of GBU while my dad was watching it. I didn't know what movie it was from until several years later when I saw the entire movie.

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« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2005, 03:21:16 PM »

I must have been 10, 12 I don't remember which. It was Christmas Eve, and Back to the Future III was on, and that has a little clip of Fo$ in it.

I think I was must have been all of 21 by the time I actually saw the whole film (Fo$, not BttF3). Took me a few viewings to really get into them though. There was no leaping-out-of-the-seat-wow-this-is-amazing moment for me I'm afraid.

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« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2005, 04:30:48 PM »

Quote
It was Christmas Eve, and Back to the Future III was on, and that has a little clip of Fo$ in it.
I just watched all the Back to the Future movies again a few days ago. It was Part II that has the clip from Fistful of Dollars, and it's Part III where Marty puts on the poncho and says his name is Clint Eastwood. Grin (I love those movies!)

Anyhow, I remember back when I first saw Part II, I wasn't sure which of the movies that was from, I hadn't seen them yet.

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« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2005, 12:30:32 PM »

Like many of you, the first time I saw these films was on TV, and on a Saturday. I used to live in a part of Virginia that picked up both Norfolk and Richmond tv channels (this was before Cable TV, as we know it.) Both areas regularly ran the trilogy as their late movie. Even cropped and with all the local car commercials, they were special. I always wanted to see more, as I remember the drive-ins running lots of spaghettis like "Blindman" and "Trinity" but I was too young to drive myself.
       These films were a big deal to us kids, and there were often bragging rights on who had seen which on the long school bus rides in rural Va. But not matter what, the triliogy was always the cornerstones.
     It made watching reruns of "Rawhide" all the cooler.

Miguel

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