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Author Topic: La collina degli stivali aka Boot Hill (1969)  (Read 25033 times)
stanton
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« Reply #60 on: June 22, 2009, 08:53:44 AM »

Yes, for me all these circus scenes are magnificent.

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mike siegel
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« Reply #61 on: June 23, 2009, 03:56:13 AM »

DUST DEVIL, I agree in general with your opinion!
Although I such a big fan.

But I saw and see genre films always in relation: as for this genre, out of 700- 800 films shot during
a period of some 20 years, SO MUCH crap was produced. And some of that crap is still nice to watch,
when your sick of watching TV or you don't want to see the TOP 20 again (for the 12th time).

So in comparison to what showed up in terms of talent during that period, I rate Colizzi very very high.
He was over-ambitious from the start! It shows with the uncut DIO PERDONA - IO NO! Ii IS too long.
But I rather see a slow DIO PERDONA for all it's style, atmosphere, actors and faces than any of Castellari
for instance.

Also Colizzi made his trilogy very fast - less than 30 months for three films!
So what didn't work in the end regarding the scripts or whatever, he compensated
with very good direction in terms of visual film making. My girlfriend is a good test audience there
for me: when she takes a look a 80% of my SW collection, she giggles!
When she looks at the Leone films, some of the Corbuccis and Sollimas or the Colizzis, she only laughs at the jokes -
never at the phoney actors, bad costumes stupid dialogues or cheap settings. Because there aren't many in those films.





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titoli
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« Reply #62 on: June 23, 2009, 07:28:48 AM »

My girlfriend is a good test audience there
for me: when she takes a look a 80% of my SW collection, she giggles!
When she looks at the Leone films, some of the Corbuccis and Sollimas or the Colizzis, she only laughs at the jokes -
never at the phoney actors, bad costumes stupid dialogues or cheap settings. Because there aren't many in those films.

What's her reaction to Petronis?

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stanton
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« Reply #63 on: June 23, 2009, 12:06:52 PM »

Maybe she falls asleep as Petroni is only a routine director without flair.


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mike siegel
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« Reply #64 on: June 23, 2009, 03:41:27 PM »

Oh no...

She liked TEPEPA. (I restored it on DVD, the German version was cut by some 45 minutes!)
And I like DA UOMO A UOMO a lot.

Two of the TOP 25 for my money!

Her favorites are MY NAME IS NOBODY, OUATITW, TRINITY IS STILL MY NAME.

This evening I showed her FOD for the very first time. It's hard for
her to imagine the impact it had 44 years ago.
She liked the noise of the cat a lot Smiley


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« Reply #65 on: June 24, 2009, 01:35:21 AM »

I like Tepepa too, but I think Damiani would have been the better director. The quality of Tepea is founded in the screenplay. Petroni doesn't waste it, but he also doesn't add very much. The final action sequence is e.g. a rather lousy one.

He he, I have also a "restored" German version with German subs for the Italian only parts, but it's not your reconstruction.

Da uomo a uomo on the other hand is the most overrated of all well-known SWs. Still not a bad one, but there are about 70 better SWs.

The other Petroni westerns are so so, even Provvidenza isn't too bad.

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mike siegel
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« Reply #66 on: June 24, 2009, 08:23:22 AM »

Yes. But Damiani wasn't there unfortunately.

Ok, I'll watch UOMO again over the weekend, didn't see it for years. Can't wait for my reaction Smiley

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« Reply #67 on: June 24, 2009, 01:05:02 PM »

DUST DEVIL, I agree in general with your opinion!
Although I such a big fan.

But I saw and see genre films always in relation: as for this genre, out of 700- 800 films shot during
a period of some 20 years, SO MUCH crap was produced. And some of that crap is still nice to watch,
when your sick of watching TV or you don't want to see the TOP 20 again (for the 12th time).

So in comparison to what showed up in terms of talent during that period, I rate Colizzi very very high.
He was over-ambitious from the start! It shows with the uncut DIO PERDONA - IO NO! Ii IS too long.
But I rather see a slow DIO PERDONA for all it's style, atmosphere, actors and faces than any of Castellari
for instance.

Also Colizzi made his trilogy very fast - less than 30 months for three films!
So what didn't work in the end regarding the scripts or whatever, he compensated
with very good direction in terms of visual film making. My girlfriend is a good test audience there
for me: when she takes a look a 80% of my SW collection, she giggles!
When she looks at the Leone films, some of the Corbuccis and Sollimas or the Colizzis, she only laughs at the jokes -
never at the phoney actors, bad costumes stupid dialogues or cheap settings. Because there aren't many in those films.

Sorry to be late on the answer but I'm very busy these days Smiley


I agree with what you say: in the sea of mediocre and for fans only SW crap the Italian film industry produced back in those days this movie/trilogy certainly stands out. The fact is, although I gave it a (around) 6 I sort of liked it; as a whole it didn't ring the bell, that's true, but various aspects of it (sets, costumes, ideas, complex story, ensemble cast, etc.) although crude-looking undoubtedly have value. I forgot to mention in my previous post this is the only one in the trilogy I didn't see when I was a kid, so maybe that's the answer to why I wasn't blown away; the other two are great in my mind with all their flaws, because I grew up watching them, so naturally I was expecting this one to be also when I first saw it in the early 00s. That was obviously a tough mission.

But this what you're saying is very interesting, that he made that trilogy in only 30 (!) months. I didn't know that. What's the back-story behind that (if you know)?

After the success of the first they wanted him to make the more movies he could with Hill and Spencer, in short time, before his 'directorial/beginner's luck' and excitement about the entertaining duo runs out? This sounds like the possible scenario of what happened. If so it's a great pity, I also think he could have made something great if he had the time to work calmly.

« Last Edit: June 24, 2009, 01:10:24 PM by Dust Devil » Logged



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mike siegel
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« Reply #68 on: June 24, 2009, 03:34:21 PM »

Oh no.
he was his 'own man'.
But back then films were produced much faster than today.
I mean even Leone did three in three years. And has wasn't the fastest film maker Smiley
Leone is reported to have called himself Colizzis mentor. He realized that Colizzi
had a similar taste in visual film making. And he learned him a lot during the editing
of GBU. (DIO PERDONA is in a way a copy of GBU. The shooting title was  IL CANE, IL GATTO, IL VOLPE.
(The dog, the cat, the fox) - three guys fighthing for a treasure of gold Smiley

Colizzi just had a ball when he started directing. He was already 40 when he did his first film (DIO PERDONA IO NO!) so I guess
he didn't want to waste time. And he & Hill & Spencer hit it off immediately.
Hill replaced Peter Martell during shooting when Martell broke his foot during a fight with
his girlfriend in their hotel room! And Spencer only took the job (he was doing well in Rome
doing promo-related stuff for TV after his carreer as swim-star and occasional jobs
as song writer) because Colizzi bugged him to do it: Colizzi couldn't anybody heavy AND athletic.

Colizzi loved Wallach in GBU - so he cast him in IL QUATTRO DELL'AVE MARIA.
He loved Lionel Stander & Woody Stroode in OUATITW, so he cast them in COLLINA DEGLI STIVALI!
Of all directors, Colizzi was the closest one to Leone.

Anyway, it wasn't uncommon to produce those films very fast. But some show the short production time, some don't! Like Colizzis.
Although they have their flaws - and maybe would have been even better with more working time
added to the schedule - they have the certain quality I expect to see in a good film.

When Spencer/Hill worked for two years with Barboni, Colizzi started preparing their first contemporary film -
PIU FORTE, RAGAZZI!. A big extravaganza. Shot in Columbia of all countries! I love that film. (partly
because I'm into aviation maybe). It's not very popular in the US / UK. Like IL MERCENARIO, that
kind of syndrom...

Colizzi then did a similiar film with Keith Carradine & Tom Skerritt. I understand
his health wasn't the best. He would have done more with Hill / Spencer for sure, but he died at the age of 53 in 1978.

« Last Edit: June 24, 2009, 03:41:05 PM by mike siegel » Logged


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« Reply #69 on: June 25, 2009, 01:17:56 AM »

Thanks for the info @Mike, mighty interesting (as always) ! Afro

But it's ironic that both he and Sergio Leone died relatively young. I'm not saying Colizzi was as good as Leone but he certainly could have made some good movies after, as he showed he definitely had potential. Più forte, ragazzi! (Hill and Spencer with airplanes in the Amazonas) I haven't seen in a long time, but I remember liking it a great deal. Arrivano Joe e Margherito and Switch (never heard of them until now to be honest) are getting lousy ratings on IMDb, so I doubt I'll ever search for them.

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mike siegel
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« Reply #70 on: June 25, 2009, 04:18:23 AM »

Yes..
Great loss.  Like my #1 Peckinpah they died much too young. And left us with the (partly) awful 80's crap.

Thinking about it, I'll go and check ARRIVANO JOE E MARGHERITO again. Maybe it isn't that bad at all.
PIU FORTE was soo good, it would be tragic the the follow up wouldn't be at least 50% of that one..

PIU FORTE was a tremendous hit in Germany, (Papillon was #1 that year, followed by PIU FORTE)
It was most important for Hil/Spencer to see where they were headin' after the Italo-Western sort
of ended. Colizzi made the best use of his stars, a great location, 'real' props and his usual visual
taste: it really plays best at a theatre. I saw it numerous times there (it played for over ten years
in German cinemas) and the scope fotography / composition is just great. Come to think of it,
I guess it was the last Hill/Spencer in scope!
The music (Flying through the air) made the Top10 single charts!

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« Reply #71 on: June 25, 2009, 07:17:46 AM »

Leone is reported to have called himself Colizzis mentor. He realized that Colizzi
had a similar taste in visual film making.

Interesting info. I agree that Colizzi's SW trilogy does have a nice visual style.

DIO PERDONA is in a way a copy of GBU. The shooting title was  IL CANE, IL GATTO, IL VOLPE.
(The dog, the cat, the fox) - three guys fighthing for a treasure of gold Smiley...
Colizzi loved Wallach in GBU - so he cast him in IL QUATTRO DELL'AVE MARIA.
He loved Lionel Stander & Woody Stroode in OUATITW, so he cast them in COLLINA DEGLI STIVALI!
Of all directors, Colizzi was the closest one to Leone.

I had always thought IL QUATTRO DELL'AVE MARIA was closer to GBU than DIO PERDONA... Maybe that was just Wallach's influence...

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« Reply #72 on: June 25, 2009, 08:21:10 AM »

Yes..
Great loss.  Like my #1 Peckinpah they died much too young. And left us with the (partly) awful 80's crap.

Thinking about it, I'll go and check ARRIVANO JOE E MARGHERITO again. Maybe it isn't that bad at all.
PIU FORTE was soo good, it would be tragic the the follow up wouldn't be at least 50% of that one..

PIU FORTE was a tremendous hit in Germany, (Papillon was #1 that year, followed by PIU FORTE)
It was most important for Hil/Spencer to see where they were headin' after the Italo-Western sort
of ended. Colizzi made the best use of his stars, a great location, 'real' props and his usual visual
taste: it really plays best at a theatre. I saw it numerous times there (it played for over ten years
in German cinemas) and the scope fotography / composition is just great. Come to think of it,
I guess it was the last Hill/Spencer in scope!
The music (Flying through the air) made the Top10 single charts!

I'll watch PFR one of these days, I watched some clips at YT and the nostalgia kicked me real hard Afro

Arrivano Joe e Margherito you have on DVD or in another form? The DVD is around 15 €, I confess I'm not that brave.

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mike siegel
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« Reply #73 on: June 25, 2009, 11:48:17 AM »

No, I haven't the DVD. I never was that brave too Smiley

Someone will give it to me to watch sooner or later. We know
a lot of people...

GBU - Colizzi:
QUATTRO too of course, yes. Colizzi LOVED GBU. He worked on 'serious b/w' 50's films
with Fellini, De Sica and so forth (great stuff), but when he watched Leone making GBU,
he knew what he really wanted to do!
Even PIU FORTE is GBU. Hill is always bringing Spencer to do stuff he doesn't want to do..
In fact Europe's most successful duo (Spencer/Hill) was therefore
based on GBU! That teasing / friendship stuff Colizzi took from GBU and used it with Hill / Spencer / Wolff,
them with Hill / Spencer / Wallach and from then on with Hill / Spencer alone. They did it for 20 years Smiley


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« Reply #74 on: June 26, 2009, 03:21:58 AM »

I never connected that myself, because I always thought all movies (regardless of their genre) produced in Italy back in the 60s and 70s really influenced one another, in one way or another, but now that I think this what you're saying very much makes sense. Same with directors. Hill and Spencer, although their movies were not the peak of artistic creativity, ruled the (family) comedy scene in Italy, and they were also well known in most of Europe, so Colizzi certainly should be given credit for uniting them on screen. Besides, from time to time they really had a big hit, that was also a good movie (like Più forte, ragazzi! or about 10 years later Corbucci's Chi trova un amico, trova un tesoro).

In the end, as you say - those movies have a certain charm that makes you wanna watch them even when they're generally bad, out of curiosity if anything else, something that doesn't quite function with classic American movies (not even Ws).

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