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| | |-+  here's what it was like in 1967....great NYT article....
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: here's what it was like in 1967....great NYT article....  ( 12030 )
The Smoker
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Well.. well. if it isn't.


« #15 : November 15, 2005, 05:51:32 PM »



On the German DVD. The FOD one is the same POV as the film closing shot.
Sentenza posted some hi-res artwork design for the Paramount Nobody release.
http://www.tle-films.com/mnin_nidg_cover.htm
Must be able to find the inner backgrounds to the Dollars ones from Torsten Kaiser.

My 35mm? :- Nothing iconic. but my fav amusing scene. Joe in bed and Silvamito standing over, peering at him. The angles really odd. Clint looks like hes been tucked in to bed the night before. Just this annoyed looking face peering up at the baretender at the end of a rolled up mexican blanket. class ;D 


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« #16 : November 15, 2005, 05:53:36 PM »

Le Bon, I posted a similar shot in the Leone still of the week section here:

http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=2446.45

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« #17 : November 15, 2005, 05:54:42 PM »

Thanks for the link - would be great if Sentenza could find the link for the other ones.......



On the German DVD. The FOD one is the same POV as the film closing shot.
Sentenza posted some hi-res artwork design for the Paramount Nobody release.
http://www.tle-films.com/mnin_nidg_cover.htm
Must be able to find the inner backgrounds to the Dollars ones from Torsten Kaiser.

My 35mm? :- Nothing iconic. but my fav amusing scene. Joe in bed and Silvamito standing over, peering at him. The angles really odd. Clint looks like hes been tucked in to bed the night before. Just this annoyed looking face peering up at the baretender at the end of a rolled up mexican blanket. class ;D 

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« #18 : November 16, 2005, 05:54:51 AM »

yea i'll scan some when i get a chance


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« #19 : November 16, 2005, 12:05:14 PM »

My 35mm is of Ramon in his white shirt on a white horse with white building in background. Looks nice.
I am very pleased with the package too. The picture quality, colour is excellent.

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« #20 : November 24, 2005, 07:52:19 AM »

Some photos of the German DVD inlays.
Not great quality because the clear digipack parts.


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« #21 : November 24, 2005, 10:01:55 AM »

I don't want to sound corny and can't remember whether I have done already this, but I want once and for all thank all the contributors to this thread and to the forum. You bring tears to my eyes, folks!


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« #22 : December 07, 2005, 08:30:14 AM »

Here's another - anybody else have any?


The documentary that's discussed in that article is quite cool - Westerns Italian Style! It avaliable as an extra on the Blue Underground Run Man Run DVD.

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« #23 : December 07, 2005, 08:38:26 AM »

These are two of my favorite negative FAFDM reviews:

Eastwood Western Is Indigestible
By Toni Mastroianni
Cleveland Press May 25, 1967


http://www.clevelandmemory.org/mastroianni/tm295.shtml



Bosley Crowther's 1967 New York Times review is also a little less than complimentary:

Eastwood Film
2 Rivals in Murder Are Presented as Heroes

By BOSLEY CROWTHER
Published: July 4, 1967


 THE cool-cat image of a Western gun-slinger that was studiously fabricated by Clint Eastwood in "A Fistfull of Dollars," under the direction of Sergio Leone, is repeated by Mr. Eastwood in the aptly titled "For a Few Dollars More," which broke loose with some Fourth of July fireworks at the Trans-Lux West and other theaters yesterday. Everyone susceptible to the illusion that shooting and killing with fancy flourishes are fun can indulge his bloodlust to the fullest at this synthetic Italian-Spanish-made Western film.

Once again Mr. Leone has filled his plushly colored screen and his deliberately calculated sound-track with conglomerate stimuli that agitate moods of dread and danger, of morbid menace and suspense, and then erupt in cascades of vivid violence, fistfights, shootings and death.

The perils of a professional bounty killer, which Mr. Eastwood portrays, are multiplied in this instance not only by the wariness and tricks of the gang of Mexican banditti he pursues for the prices on their heads, but by the deceits of another bounty killer who is going after the same gang. The menace of this rival, played by Lee Van Cleef, is more dangerous and unpredictable than the known quantity of the murderous gang.

Thus it is the presence of this rival, as cool of manner and as deadly with the guns as the crafty, cheroot-chewing Mr. Eastwood, that furnishes Mr. Leone with what there is of interesting conflict between characters of modest scope.

The gunman of Mr. Eastwood is a fierce and fearless killing machine. So is the older, more experienced and righteously motivated gunman of Mr. Van Cleef. If anything, he is more clever and more sophisticated with the guns. Both are equally ruthless. Thus their rivalry, their dubious partnership and their frequent temptations to betrayal are the stuff of suspense in the film.

But, of course, the dynamics of it are in the freedom and ferocity with which Mr. Leone piles violence upon violence and charges the screen with the hideous fantasies of sudden death. In the close-up faces of his ugly ruffians, highlighted and shadowed in burnished hues, and in the ominous thump of drums and wail of trumpets that preface his menace scenes, he prepares us for the violent explosions that mark the deadly circuit of pursuit. In the bark of guns, the whine of bullets and the spinning bodies of men mortally hit, he provides the aural and visual stimulation for an excitement of morbid lust.

One may think that this is sheer fabrication, that the fantasies of killing contrived are devices for emotional escapism, that the foulness of the bandit leader, played with a hint of degeneration by Gian Maria Volonte, is a moral reason and justification for his being run down and slaughtered with his gang.

But the fact that this film is constructed to endorse the exercise of murderers, to emphasize killer bravado and generate glee in frantic manifestations of death is, to my mind, a sharp indictment of it as so-called entertainment in this day. There is nothing wholesome about killing men for bounty, nothing funny about seeing them die, no matter how much the audience may sit there and burble and laugh.

 







"'Don't take any chances you don't have to, don't trust anybody you don't have to trust and don't do no favors you don't have to do"- Ace Hanna
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« #24 : December 07, 2005, 08:59:02 AM »

Thanks for sharing - quite funny how the world has changed eh?

These are two of my favorite negative FAFDM reviews:

Eastwood Western Is Indigestible
By Toni Mastroianni
Cleveland Press May 25, 1967


http://www.clevelandmemory.org/mastroianni/tm295.shtml



Bosley Crowther's 1967 New York Times review is also a little less than complimentary:

Eastwood Film
2 Rivals in Murder Are Presented as Heroes

By BOSLEY CROWTHER
Published: July 4, 1967


 THE cool-cat image of a Western gun-slinger that was studiously fabricated by Clint Eastwood in "A Fistfull of Dollars," under the direction of Sergio Leone, is repeated by Mr. Eastwood in the aptly titled "For a Few Dollars More," which broke loose with some Fourth of July fireworks at the Trans-Lux West and other theaters yesterday. Everyone susceptible to the illusion that shooting and killing with fancy flourishes are fun can indulge his bloodlust to the fullest at this synthetic Italian-Spanish-made Western film.

Once again Mr. Leone has filled his plushly colored screen and his deliberately calculated sound-track with conglomerate stimuli that agitate moods of dread and danger, of morbid menace and suspense, and then erupt in cascades of vivid violence, fistfights, shootings and death.

The perils of a professional bounty killer, which Mr. Eastwood portrays, are multiplied in this instance not only by the wariness and tricks of the gang of Mexican banditti he pursues for the prices on their heads, but by the deceits of another bounty killer who is going after the same gang. The menace of this rival, played by Lee Van Cleef, is more dangerous and unpredictable than the known quantity of the murderous gang.

Thus it is the presence of this rival, as cool of manner and as deadly with the guns as the crafty, cheroot-chewing Mr. Eastwood, that furnishes Mr. Leone with what there is of interesting conflict between characters of modest scope.

The gunman of Mr. Eastwood is a fierce and fearless killing machine. So is the older, more experienced and righteously motivated gunman of Mr. Van Cleef. If anything, he is more clever and more sophisticated with the guns. Both are equally ruthless. Thus their rivalry, their dubious partnership and their frequent temptations to betrayal are the stuff of suspense in the film.

But, of course, the dynamics of it are in the freedom and ferocity with which Mr. Leone piles violence upon violence and charges the screen with the hideous fantasies of sudden death. In the close-up faces of his ugly ruffians, highlighted and shadowed in burnished hues, and in the ominous thump of drums and wail of trumpets that preface his menace scenes, he prepares us for the violent explosions that mark the deadly circuit of pursuit. In the bark of guns, the whine of bullets and the spinning bodies of men mortally hit, he provides the aural and visual stimulation for an excitement of morbid lust.

One may think that this is sheer fabrication, that the fantasies of killing contrived are devices for emotional escapism, that the foulness of the bandit leader, played with a hint of degeneration by Gian Maria Volonte, is a moral reason and justification for his being run down and slaughtered with his gang.

But the fact that this film is constructed to endorse the exercise of murderers, to emphasize killer bravado and generate glee in frantic manifestations of death is, to my mind, a sharp indictment of it as so-called entertainment in this day. There is nothing wholesome about killing men for bounty, nothing funny about seeing them die, no matter how much the audience may sit there and burble and laugh.

 







titoli
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« #25 : December 07, 2005, 10:38:30 AM »

I think that what has changed are the people writing reviews.


Jordan Krug
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« #26 : December 08, 2005, 10:39:07 AM »

Well, yes - but the violence level in the cinema is at such a high now that it makes the dollars films seem tame - at the time, I guess these would be considered as pushing the envelope, as well as a number of other films released around that time (a cumulative effect) - I guess it's a lot harder to shock people now, isn't it....


I think that what has changed are the people writing reviews.

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