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Author Topic: Seven Men from Now aka 7 Men from Now (1956)  (Read 14804 times)
dave jenkins
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« Reply #30 on: December 02, 2011, 01:38:58 AM »

Absolutely amazing what an awesome scene could be made of 4 people just sitting in a wagon and talking (actually, almost all the talking was done by Marvin, with Scott occasionally telling him to shut up).
Scott didn't need lines to be able to act, he could do it with looks. Agreed, fantastic scene, great film.

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« Reply #31 on: December 02, 2011, 10:41:14 AM »

Another interesting bit, but first I have to give the

SPOILER ALERT

the editing of the final shootout between Marvin and Scott was very interesting -- the camera is only on Marvin, and suddenly you hear the shot and he is dead -- you don't actually see Scott draw. Usually, on shootouts, it will be a wide shot of both of them, so you can see the "battle" -- but here, you only see Marvin, hear a shot, and he is dead before he can even draw. I wonder why they did that.

(One option is that as Eastwood and Frayling said, you caouldn't have the shooter/shootee in same scene, but that notion is a) false; and b) they still could have first shown Scott draw, then cut to Marvin dying. So that is definitely wrong).

 on the special features, one of the guys who was interviewed suggested the following: throughout the film, Marvin has been the character playing the "fastest draw" kind; you see him playing with his guns (especially in one memorable sequence in the saloon); but you never see much discussed about Scott being a particularly fast draw. Sure, he killed the 2 guys in the opening scene and some others, but the emphasis is really on Marvin being the quick draw. Therefore, you are focused on Marvin, and suddenly, BOOM! you suddenly realize Scott is so quick,  Marvin is shot before he could even draw. So the camera focuses on Marvin cuz he is the one who throughout the movie has been the "quick draw" guy... Interesting point, though I still think that shot was a bit weird, and I'd have preferred if they had shown Scott drawing

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« Reply #32 on: April 09, 2013, 07:38:18 PM »

Rewatch confirmed my above opinion. I feel redundant making the same points about all of Boetticher's films but why not? That's auteurism ain't it?

Quote
Budd Boetticher and Randolph Scott collaborated on their first Western in 1956. Film historians consider it part of the Ranown Cycle, even though John Wayne’s Batjac Studios produced the film. Classification aside, Seven Men from Now remains Boetticher’s finest work, and a highpoint for the Western genre generally.

Ex-lawman Ben Stride (Randolph Scott) tracks seven outlaws who killed his wife in a hold-up. During his question Stride joins up with Julie (Gail Russell) and John Greer (Walter Reed), two pioneers headed for California. Stride warms up to Julie, who nonetheless remains loyal to her milquetoast husband. Things grow more complicated when part-time crook Masters (Lee Marvin) joins with the gang. Masters may have been involved in Mrs. Stride’s death; Julie learns John might not be innocent, either.

Groggy risks sounding like a broken record but it’s true: these films’ greatest virtue is simplicity. Using California’s Alabama Hills, a small but perfect cast and Burt Kennedy’s terse screenwriting, Boetticher marshals impressive shows with modest budgets. What could be a simple revenge programmer becomes transcendent. This initial entry provides the template for future Ranown Westerns, all stellar variants on a theme.

As in The Tall T, Boetticher sets the laconic Stride against the loudmouthed, weak-willed John. Here the impotent “half-man,” introduced straining at a wagon track in mud, isn’t only a coward but unwittingly complicit with the villains – though he’s at least allowed redemption. Tough, independent-minded Julie pines for the real man Stride even as she can’t betray John. Masters drives them apart through psychological gamesmanship, taunting Johnny with Julie’s affection for Stride. Yet even the snaky Masters proves noble; in the end reels, he even kills his erstwhile colleagues to ensure a fair fight.

But it’s Boetticher’s brilliant set pieces that really set Seven Men apart. His direction is consistently top-notch but he’d never quite replicate this film’s standout scenes. The movie opens with a confrontation between Stride and two drifters in a cave. It’s an incredibly tense sequence, building to an unexpected conclusion. He achieves similar effects in a face-off with hostile Indians, resolved in a satisfyingly unconventional manner. Sergio Leone once told Boetticher “I stole everything from you!”;  Seven Men’s influence on that Italian master is evident throughout, especially in the end showdown.  Masters avoids a chance at easy money, preferring instead to “earn” the loot through a formal duel.

Randolph Scott establishes the rough-hewn, leathery frontiersman he’d assay in all Boetticher’s movies. He’s even tougher than in later Ranown flicks, shrugging off gunshot wounds and blows to the head in his quest for justice. Lee Marvin shines in his first major role, making Masters a wheedling dastard with a chivalrous streak. Marvin fits this role like a glove; he’d play similar characters in The Comancheros and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance before breaking through to stardom. Gail Russell (Angel and the Badman) turns in a warm, endearing performance, while Walter Reed makes a suitably pathetic figure.

Seven Men from Now is a real gem. Like all the Ranown flicks, it’s a flawless blend of compact storytelling and impeccable direction. One could pay the film no higher complement than to say it stands head and shoulders above Boetticher’s other flicks. 9/10

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2013/04/seven-men-from-now.html

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« Reply #33 on: April 09, 2013, 10:58:12 PM »

it's a very good movie, but I preferred Ride Lonesome, and possibly The Tall T, too. Again, I saw each of these movies exactly once, several years ago, so I'd like to re-watch them again soon and see where I stand.


I thought you'd mention that scene with Marvin and Scott in the wagon, where Marvin is yammering about the chick; I elaborated somewhat earlier in this thread http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=2744.msg152753#msg152753

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« Reply #34 on: April 10, 2013, 07:18:52 AM »

I thought you'd mention that scene with Marvin and Scott in the wagon
*I* thought he'd mention the coffee motif that runs through the whole picture--what the hell, Grogs? You call that a review?

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« Reply #35 on: April 10, 2013, 08:30:55 AM »

I'm a tea drinker. What care I for coffee? Tongue

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« Reply #36 on: April 10, 2013, 08:36:19 AM »

especially the black coffee they must have been drinking under the stars in the West.

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dave jenkins
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« Reply #37 on: April 10, 2013, 02:07:34 PM »

Cowboy Coffee--there's a layer of grounds in every cup!

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« Reply #38 on: April 25, 2013, 02:18:35 PM »

That reminds me of the "Horse shoe test" from one of the Lucky Luke comic books: To make real coffee, you slightly moisten a pound of coffee, heat it for a while and then see if a horse shoe sinks in. If it does, you've used too much water.

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« Reply #39 on: October 13, 2013, 08:06:43 AM »

just watched the movie again. Good times. I recently re-watched all the Boetticher/Scott Westerns with the exception of Buchanan Rides Alone and Decision at Sundown, the two worst ones which I have little interest in seeing again. (Who knows, maybe my opinion will change on the second viewing; it's happened before.)

Here's my ranking on the Boetticher/Scott Westerns, best to worst. IMO the first 4 movies are real good, each ranking somewhere between a 7.5 - 8.5/10. The bottom 3 are somewheres between a 4-6/10

Ride Lonesome
The Tall T
Seven Men from Now
Comanche Station
Westbound
Decision at Sundown
Buchanan Rides Alone

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« Reply #40 on: October 10, 2015, 08:22:39 AM »

Paramount now is letting us watch a free stream of this on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jr4SQ3IVdpQ&list=PLd0LhgZxFkVLB8Zs8bQP5B-bnLimzY0FC&oref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Djr4SQ3IVdpQ%26list%3DPLd0LhgZxFkVLB8Zs8bQP5B-bnLimzY0FC&has_verified=1

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« Reply #41 on: March 19, 2017, 06:28:14 AM »

This is a good stuff that I saw recently. A great lightning-quick shootout between Randolph Scott and Lee Marvin at the end. I didn't see either of the them draw or even go for the gun before it's over. Just the drawn-out eyeballing leading up to it.

I love the photography in this and it has some of the best rainy scenes ever filmed I reckon. I look forward to seeing this one again on my favourite western channel.

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« Reply #42 on: March 20, 2017, 06:49:20 PM »

My Rank Order For The Scott/Boettichers

Ride Lonesome (1959)
The Tall T (1957)
Comanche Station (1960)
Seven Men from Now (1956)
Decision at Sundown (1957)
Buchanan Rides Alone (1958)
Westbound (1959)


Seven Men from Now aka 7 Men from Now

Another expertly crafted Western from Boetticher and Scott.

Seven Men from Now is directed by Budd Boetticher and produced by John Wayne's Batjac Productions. Written by Burt Kennedy it stars Randolph Scott, Gail Russell & Lee Marvin. Music is by Henry Vars & William H. Clothier photographs out of the Alabama Hills and Lone Pine, California.

Former Sheriff Ben Stride is on the trail of the seven men; who whilst robbing a Wells Fargo office, killed his wife in the process. Mentally tortured by having lost his job that resulted in his wife having to work at Wells Fargo, Stride is totally driven by hurt and anger. But along the way he helps a married couple who are stuck in the mud; who persuade Stride to ride West with them in case of further problems. They are then joined by a couple of suspect characters who have their own private agenda for tagging along with Stride: all parties seemingly heading for the day when the truth will out.

Director Budd Boetticher and leading Western star Randolph Scott made between 1956 and 1960, seven interesting and genre bending films. This was the first of their collaborations, and although it can be said they were merely honing their "Adult Western" bent here, all the traits that would make the upcoming The Tall T, Ride Lonesome and Comanche Station so worthy of genre classic status is evident here in this film. Tho simple in plot; I mean man on a mission movies are not exactly rare are they? Seven Men From Now is boosted by a smartly ambiguous turn from Lee Marvin as Bill Masters, while Boetticher's ability to raise his complex and hungry characters above and beyond the standard tale further gives the piece some kudos. Incidents dot themselves throughout the story to keep the film from ever drifting to the mundane, while the location work at Lone Pine, Alabama Hills in California is gorgeous; where we should be thankful to cinematographer William H. Clothier for realising that Boetticher needs his vista to be another character.

Originally intended as a vehicle for John Wayne, who took producing duties instead when his schedule wouldn't allow him the time to star, Seven Men From Now gave Randolph Scott a chance to show just what a fine actor he was. His Ben Stride could so easily have been played as corny and grumpy, but Scott gives it the emotional depth that Burt Kennedy's script demanded. Gail Russell (Annie Greer) is the lady of the piece, she ultimately led a sad real life, but at least here as the woman caught between two men, we get to see that she did have the ability when called upon - even if this didn't relaunch her career in the way that her friend John Wayne had originally hoped for. In fact Gail was to sadly succumb to the alcoholism that blighted her life just five years later, aged just 36. Thankfully this film stands up as a fine way to remember her beauty and for the efforts that she put into the Western genre.

Lacking the heavy cloud of doom of Boetticher & Scott's best collaborations, this one, however, boasts richly interesting characters that are telling a cunning moral allegory tale. It be an Oater for those who like intelligence over yippee ki-yay like histrionics. 8/10

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