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Author Topic: Jeremiah Johnson (1972)  (Read 13029 times)
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« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2006, 02:49:29 PM »

What's disappointing about the Encore Western Channel is that of the American westerns they show there are hardly ever any John Ford westerns. There's also only a SW every now and then but never an interesting one, something usually hardly detectable as a SW, but Vengeance was a great movie I taped from there. If the Western Channel showed more Ford and SW's I'd never get to sleep at night.

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« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2006, 03:03:39 PM »

There's also only a SW every now and then but never an interesting one, something usually hardly detectable as a SW, but Vengeance was a great movie I taped from there.

and they only usually put them at some unGodly hour of the night like 3 am.

and your right..
"Vengeance" is the only good sw they have been putting on for the past year.
I saw "roy colt and winchester Jack" from Encore westerns and it was terrible. Mario Bava should be ashamed.
They never put on any Nero sw. The Mercenary hasnt been shown for years. how about "Deaf Smitty and Johnny ears", "Long live your death" or even "cry Onion"? Surly Nero is much more known then Richard Harrison.

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« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2006, 03:54:58 PM »

  geoman, have you seen The Scalphunters with Burt Lancaster, Ossie Davis, Telly Savalas, and Shelley Winters?  A very good western that seems to fly under the radar.

 
No...but thanks for the heads-up. I will surely check them out Wink

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« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2007, 01:02:30 PM »

I absolutely loved this film. I've read that it's Robert Redford's favorite film he's been involved in and I can see why. Beautifully filmed by Sydney Pollack who uses his widescreen photography to his advantage. Very atmospheric western with minimal diologue, which is a plus. Not to be missed!

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« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2007, 06:14:15 PM »

And some say he's up there still.

Beautifully filmed by Sydney Pollack who uses his widescreen photography to his advantage.

Pollack did a great job as director, but the movie was actually filmed by cinematographer by Duke Callaghan.

« Last Edit: October 05, 2007, 06:32:58 PM by Juan Miranda » Logged

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« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2007, 06:33:52 PM »

And some say he's up there still.

Pollack did a great job as director, but the movie was actually filmed by cinematographer by Duke Callaghan.

Thanks for that info Juan!

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« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2009, 08:51:48 PM »

I didn't think it was rated at all, lol.  You never see it on TV.

Isn't it famous in the US?? It's one of the most famous westerns in France... behind the Leone ones, Dance With The Wolves and Unforgiven.

Great movie, I'll try to catch it again one of these days...

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« Reply #22 on: April 24, 2009, 05:38:17 AM »

Its not that famous now only aficianado's know of it, like I said its never showed on TV, its pretty much dropped from conscienceness here. Everything is now geared to the 10-25 year old generation there is no continuity with the past everthing is what's new hear & now, hear today gone tomorrow. 

Its like Warhol predicted you get your 15 minutes of fame and then you are history.

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« Reply #23 on: April 26, 2009, 11:20:58 AM »

Its not that famous now only aficianado's know of it, like I said its never showed on TV, its pretty much dropped from conscienceness here. Everything is now geared to the 10-25 year old generation there is no continuity with the past everthing is what's new hear & now, hear today gone tomorrow. 

Its like Warhol predicted you get your 15 minutes of fame and then you are history.

The first time I heard of the film Jeremiah Johnson was when it was playing on AMC.. (it does come on every couple of moths or so on that channel) and I've wanted to see it for the longest time but I always catch it at the middle or toward the end. But yeah, AMC is geared more toward the old timers.. even though it plays movies like Pulp Fiction once a year or so. It's one of the better American channels in my opinion, doesn't play many westerns but many of the films it plays are uncut.

(I watched The Day the Earth Stood Still on amc the other day, completely uncut, I was happy)




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« Reply #24 on: May 22, 2009, 06:30:45 PM »

Jeremiah Johnson is probably the best of those rare few movies that dared to (try to) portrait and explore the life on the thorny Old Frontier. Without too much pathetic, affectation, moralizing and smart lines, this frontier-trapper Western often lets the wowed spectator enjoy the serenity and crude beauty of the life in the mountainous wilderness, but cuts right to the chase without hesitation when situation demands it.

The only problem I have is the second part, when it becomes more or less a revenge story. Well, perhaps ''problem'' is not the best way to describe it, it is more a matter or personal preference. I'm not saying I don't like the unpretentious but thoughtful way it was done in the movie, it's just that I wouldn't mind a slightly more subtle documentary approach, like in the first 2/3 of the movie.

Still a beautiful movie.


8.2/10

« Last Edit: May 22, 2009, 06:33:29 PM by Dust Devil » Logged



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« Reply #25 on: May 22, 2009, 06:58:06 PM »

For those of you that liked Jeremiah Johnson, I'd suggest to check out the Italian comic book series Ken Parker if possible. The character of Ken Parker is based on Robert Redford's interpretation of JJ. Some character's specificities are kept throughout the series but all in all it's a pretty different and original series. I think you won't be disappointed. It is considered to be one of the best comic book series about the Old West; the range and quality of the elaborated subjects are truly amazing. Needless to say, it was received far better by the critics than the audience, although it has a strong cult following.

Though, I don't know if it's available in English...

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« Reply #26 on: May 22, 2009, 07:09:24 PM »

One thing I forgot to ask: what's the name of that thing Swan (the squaw) was cooking, and JJ wouldn't eat it?

I've found out it could be something called ''frybread'' or ''bannock'' (in today's US), a type of flatbread. Could that be it?

I think I've heard somewhere it is made of tapioca, but Wikipedia says tapioca is used only by South American Indians...

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« Reply #27 on: May 22, 2009, 10:05:54 PM »

frybread is exactly like Italian zeppole.

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« Reply #28 on: May 22, 2009, 10:24:39 PM »

Doesn't quite look the same:

1) zeppole: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeppole

2) frybread: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frybread

3) bannock: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bannock_(food)

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« Reply #29 on: June 29, 2009, 04:34:05 PM »

To follow up on my brief comments in the RTLMYS thread...

Quote
In lieu of reviewing yet another mediocre musical I stupidly decided to watch (hello, Dreamgirls!), here's a review of Sydney Pollack's 1972 Western Jeremiah Johnson - a decidedly unique and different Western of a sort rarely made by Hollywood, or anyone else really. It has a lot more going for it than mere novelty, however.

The title character (Robert Redford) is a drifter and presumed Army deserter who, in around 1850, decides to strike out for the wide-open frontier of the Old West and live as a self-sufficient mountaineer. Jeremiah struggles to adapt to his new life, until he's helped by grizzled fur trapper Bear Claw (Will Geer) and eccentric ne'er-do-well Del Gue (Stefan Gierasch). Jeremiah befriends a tribe of Flatnose Indians and marries Swan (Delle Bolton), the daughter of their chief (Richard Angarola); he also adopts an orphaned boy (Josh Albee) who has survived a Blackfeet massacre, and the trio set up shop in the mountains. When Jeremiah helps a troop of cavalry cross a mountain pass on sacred Crow land, however, a - leading Jeremiah on a long and bloody vendetta against his family's killers.

Jeremiah Johnson scores some points for its premise alone. The story of trappers and mountain-men is only rarely told in Hollywood; while pop culture of the 19th and early 20th Centuries celebrated "squaw men" like Davy Crocket and Daniel Boone, who forsook white society for solitary existence in the Wilderness, few movies have actually been made on the subject. Certainly it's refreshing to see a film mostly bereft of the usual gunslinger/pioneer/bandit/cowboys-and-Indians trappings. But it's more than just the idea and story that sells the film. From the dialogue to the music to the gorgeous scenery to the pitch-perfect cast, the film has a complete sense of authenticity.

The film's wonderful moral ambiguity is perhaps its best feature. It lacks the politicking of many contemporary Westerns (The Wild Bunch, Ulzana's Raid, Duck You Sucker!), and mostly lacks the conventional heroics one might expect from the genre; it simply tells a story well. The film is mostly careful to avoid painting either Indians or settlers as "bad", which is welcome; along with Black Robe and Broken Arrow, it's one of the few films to give a nuanced and fairly accurate depiction of Native Americans without resorting to the Noble Savage stereotype of, say, Dances With Wolves or Little Big Man. The cavalry troop violates Crow land but only to deliver food and supplies to starving settlers (shades of the Donner Party?); the Crow's raid on the Johnson homestead is merely a retaliation against that. Jeremiah's vendetta against the Crow is the only part of the film that approaches cliche or convention, but the film redeems the blood-soaked heroics with a wonderfully unexpected conclusion. Commendably, the film doesn't make any broad statements about imperialism or settlement of the West; it's simply the story of a man trying to survive in a rough and cruel wilderness. And for that, the film deserves a lot of commendation.

Sydney Pollack provides wonderful direction; he uses his cast economically and well, and makes the most of a truly awe-inspiring set of locations. The film has an endless variety of beautiful scenery, from frozen, snowbound mountain-tops to sandy desert to pristine woodland; the movie certainly has a lot of variety in its locations, all captured beautifully by Duke Callaghan's cinematography. The art direction and costume design are rough-hewn and period-perfect, creating a wonderful sense of authenticity. The music is also worthy of praise: Tim McIntire and John Rubinstein contribute a wonderfully authentic, rustic and evocative score that adds immeasurably to the film.

Special praise, I think, goes out for the script: if there's a better duo of collaborating screenwriters than John Milius (The Wind and the Lion) and Edward Anhalt (Becket) out there (maybe Robert Bolt and Michael Wilson), I'd like to know about it; their script is wonderfully economical and sparse, with long passages without speaking; the scant dialogue that is provided is appropriately rustic and colorful without overdoing it. This is one of the few Westerns that actually sounds period-authentic in its dialogue.

Robert Redford carries most of the film admirably; his tough, misanthropic mountain man is a departure from his usual breezy persona, and Redford gives very near a career-best turn. The film is very frequently stolen, however, by a colorful supporting cast, particularly Will Geer as the wily trapper who teaches Jeremiah the tricks of the trade, and Stefan Gierasch as an eccentric drifter with a grudge against Indians. The Indian cast acquits themselves well; Joaquin Martinez, Richard Angalora and the beautiful Del Bolton all give brief but fine performances.

Jeremiah Johnson is a great film and a wonderfully unique and original entry in the Western genre. Many other Westerns are better as entertainment and art, but few match the film's stark, unforgiving sense of realism.

Rating: 8/10 - Highly Recommended

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2009/06/jeremiah-johnson.html

« Last Edit: June 29, 2009, 04:37:55 PM by Groggy » Logged


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