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Author Topic: I got the time line down...  (Read 86437 times)
cigar joe
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« Reply #150 on: June 12, 2009, 07:55:36 PM »

Maybe Alcatraz had Confederate Navy prisoners who knows, it would be interesting to find out.

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« Reply #151 on: June 12, 2009, 07:59:31 PM »

Looking into it a bit, there was some trouble with Confederate sympathizers in Southern California during the early years of the war. I think those guys might have accounted for most of them.

According to Wikipedia (sorry I don't have a more scholary source on-hand):

Quote
At the time of the war's outbreak, Federal troops were under the command of Colonel (Brevet Brigadier General) Albert Sidney Johnston, headquartered at the Department of the Pacific in Benicia. General Johnston strongly believed that the South represented the cause of freedom, and traditional American democracy of popular sovereignty.

The majority of Southern sympathizers in the state made plans to secede with Oregon to form a "Pacific Republic." Their plans rested on the cooperation of General Johnston. Johnston understood this, and met with the men, but he declined. He said he had sworn an oath to defend the Union, and although he believed that Lincoln had violated and destroyed the Constitution holding the Union together, he would not go against his word. Thus the plans for California to secede from the United States never came to fruition. Johnston soon resigned his commission and joined the fight in the east as a general with the Confederacy. The Los Angeles Mounted Rifles escorted him across the desert, crossing the Colorado River on July 4, 1861. Like other units leaving California for the Confederacy, the volunteers joined up principally with Texas regiments. General Johnston was later killed at the Battle of Shiloh.

The only Confederate Flag captured in California during the Civil War took place on July 4, 1861 in Sacramento. During Independence Day celebrations, secessionist Major J. P. Gillis celebrated the independence of the United States from Britain as well as the southern states from the Union. He unfurled a Confederate flag of his own design and proceeded to march down the street to both the applause and jeers of onlookers. Jack Biderman and Curtis Clark, enraged by Gillis' actions, accosted him and "captured" the flag.[3] The flag itself is based on the first Confederate flag, the Stars and Bars. However, the canton contains seventeen stars rather than the Confederate's seven. Because the flag was captured by Jack Biderman, it is often also referred to as the "Biderman Flag".

...

Eighty-eight violent incidents of various sizes were fought in California, many of them against outlaws trying to capture gold for their own benefit. (No captured gold was sent to the Confederacy.) Most of the fights were guerrilla battles, or in the terminology of the day, battles with "partisan rangers." Indeed, a few men left the guerrillas under the command of the ruthless school teacher, William Quantrill, in Missouri, and came to California to train supporters there. One partisan warrior, Dan Showalter, once robbed a stagecoach of all its gold, leaving a receipt behind with the driver to keep him out of trouble with his bosses. The westernmost attack related to the Civil War occurred just outside downtown San Jose. A bronze historical plaque marking the site identifies it as a battle with "outlaws," rather than a battle of the American Civil War.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_in_the_Civil_War

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« Reply #152 on: May 09, 2010, 12:50:29 PM »

Good work

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« Reply #153 on: August 12, 2011, 01:15:17 PM »

Message to Cigar joe...........Were you Arch Stantons room mate at West Point ?

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« Reply #154 on: August 12, 2011, 07:13:54 PM »

 Afro

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« Reply #155 on: August 16, 2011, 02:00:15 PM »

Would love to know............Are you a seasoned Bounty Hunter or do you work in shoe shop like Bronco Billy ?

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« Reply #156 on: December 26, 2011, 11:15:54 AM »

How can they have dynamite when it wasn't invented before 1865 (by Nobel.....of all people  Huh

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« Reply #157 on: December 26, 2011, 05:06:24 PM »

How can they have dynamite when it wasn't invented before 1865 (by Nobel.....of all people  Huh

It wasn't dynamite, they were black powder sticks, the boxes are marked explosives not TNT not dynamite.

Yes, dynamite invented in 1867 by Alfred Nobel, who figured out how to make nitroglycerin easier to transport. But, that said, commercial powder sticks or powder catrridges (black powder) were used by some mines and industries; others actually rolled their own. Here are some discriptive references.

Phase one: 1860-1871 "Three men (two strikers and a drill holder) would be employed to prepare the blasting hole "using an ordinary inch and one quarter drill." It would take a full shift for the three men to drill a sufficient number of holes which usually extended from 6 - 10 feet into the rock. Since the holes were rarely uniform, the blasting cartridges had to be made by hand. According to George Stuart,(19)9 a 19th - century mining entrepreneur, the cartridge shells were covered with thick brown paper and common soap was used to make them impervious to water. The shells were not only made to fill the holes as drilled but were adapted as well to the condition of the rock.(20) "

George Stuart was associated with gold mining in Nova Scotia from the early '60s until his death. He assisted his father in the construction of the first stamp mill at Waverley in the early 1860s. (From: G. Stuart, "History and Outlook of Gold Mining in Nova Scotia" (unpublished paper, 1933), p. 1: "I helped my father to erect in Waverley the first gold stamp mill in Canada." See also, H. J. Morgan, The Canadian Men and Women of Their Time: A Handbook of Canadian Biography of Living Characters (1912) p. 1074). Stuart was born in 1842.) and "Pellet powders, made from sodium nitrate, are finding extensive use. These consist of cylindrical "pellets," 2 inches long, wrapped in paraffined paper cartridges, 11/4, 1 3/8, 1 1/2, 1 3/4, and 2 inches in diameter, which resemble cartridges of dynamite. The cartridges contain 2, 3, or 4 pellets which are perforated in the direction of their axis with a 3/@-inch hole for the insertion of a squib or fuse for firing. " The description indicates that powder sticks of various diameters were available in 4", 6", and 8" lengths.

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« Reply #158 on: June 03, 2012, 08:44:48 AM »

It wasn't dynamite, they were black powder sticks, the boxes are marked explosives not TNT not dynamite.

so if you drilled a hole in a rock face say 10ft deep and stuck a black powder stick in it...would it blow the lot up or would you need 10 sticks in the hole?

ICE

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« Reply #159 on: June 03, 2012, 01:22:11 PM »

so if you drilled a hole in a rock face say 10ft deep and stuck a black powder stick in it...would it blow the lot up or would you need 10 sticks in the hole?

ICE

Ten sticks...

But it would depend on what you were trying to achieve,  drilling a shaft or a tunnel you'd have perimeter holes defining the outside boundaries and one (or two) center holes. You'd want the center charges to go off first an blow a cavity out so that the outside blasts would blow the surrounding rock into the just evacuated center kind of directing the energy towards the center rather than fracturing the rock of tunnel walls .

Think about it how else are you going to effectively fill a horizontal hole and keep the powder from getting wet, the wax paper rolled charges make packing the hole easier and keeps the powder dry

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« Reply #160 on: June 04, 2012, 04:08:54 PM »

Ten sticks...



What sort of energy would a stick of explosive produce.... can you compare it to something we can relate to...?
ICE

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« Reply #161 on: June 04, 2012, 06:20:11 PM »

What sort of energy would a stick of explosive produce.... can you compare it to something we can relate to...?
ICE

Not sure, I do believe the energy released id measured in joules though.

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« Reply #162 on: May 31, 2014, 04:03:02 PM »

All the hangings are in Texas based on the reading of the sentences each one mentions "the laws of this state" New Mexico was a territory so that points to West Texas. I'll post the maps soon and it will become clearer. 
Sorry, CJ, after going through the hanging scenes carefully yesterday and today, I've found that the signage indicates they were all done in New Mexico. The first is in Mesilla, NM (there's a bank sign clearly visible behind Clint as he hitches up), and the second is in Valverde (Angel Eyes walks past the sign for the post office). I guess Mickey Knox blew it on "the laws of this state" thing.

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« Reply #163 on: May 31, 2014, 04:19:20 PM »

What sort of energy would a stick of explosive produce.... can you compare it to something we can relate to...?
ICE

I believe an 1/8 to 1/4 stick was used to blow tree stumps.

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cigar joe
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« Reply #164 on: June 01, 2014, 05:12:39 AM »

Sorry, CJ, after going through the hanging scenes carefully yesterday and today, I've found that the signage indicates they were all done in New Mexico. The first is in Mesilla, NM (there's a bank sign clearly visible behind Clint as he hitches up), and the second is in Valverde (Angel Eyes walks past the sign for the post office). I guess Mickey Knox blew it on "the laws of this state" thing.

well, there is a Val Verde County in Texas and a Mesilla Valley in far West Texas ;-)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesilla_Valley

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Val_Verde_County,_Texas


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