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Author Topic: MORRICONE CONCERT!!!!!  (Read 20803 times)
The Firecracker
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« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2007, 09:45:54 AM »

Let me get a few things out of the way before I let you guys know what went down within the first couple of rows.

First I'd like to say thank you to those who sent me birthday greetings via pm. I will individually thank you all eventually but at the moment I am using a computer at the public library because my one and only computer is on the fritz.



Peacemaker: Sorry buddy. I don't know how to post pics on the internet. Sad
 Your dad said he could help you right?

I had a wonderful time meeting CJ and Peace who are both down to earth dudes and easy to get along with. CJ's wife was very nice and seemed interested in what I had to say (though I said very little) and Peacemaker's dad was constantly cracking jokes.

A shame we can't do this again in the near future.

I apologise to you both for not being apart of the festivities a bit more. I was rather ill and didn't feel like myself.
And thanks for dropping me off at the resturant after Virgil's. If it wasn't for your help I probably would have had a harder time finding the place.

Before the concert I met up with a friend who was meeting several people in a cuban resturant called "Havana". The "several people" included...Yun Tang (a Vietnamese violinist who stars in the movie "He ni zai yi qi" aka "Together"), Alexander Payne (director of "sideways", "About Schmidt", "Citizen Ruth" and others...), Darrel Ang, Gerry Herman (friend of my friend who set all this up) and Jashua Marston (director of "Maria full of grace").
All of them were great and friendly people. Except Marston who I believe got angry with me after I made a derogatory comment about the communist party.
I didn't like his movie anyway...a$$hole.

Afterwards we all went to the concert and sat in the same row (except for Payne who was seated a few rows in front of us). There were two celebrities I saw with my own eyes. One of them being Wilem Dafoe (a few rows ahead) and the other being Liam Neeson (two rows directly behind). Whispers in the crowd suggested that Eli Wallach and Quentin Tarantino were attending the concert but I didn't see them.

The concert was good I thought. My only complaint being that too many strings were used. Not that many vocals which the Maestro excels at. And no whistling Angry
Ennio gave me the impression that he didn't want to be there (CJ and Peace: did you get this impression to?). He kept walking off the stage for long periods of time and only gave three encores (for which I should be thankful of course but I heard in Italy he gave 6).
His new soprano was quite good.

Did the concert last about an hour? I thought it was too short myself. Couldn't have been longer than an hour and 20 minutes (including the encores)


Forgive the typos here but I am being timed at the library and cannot double check the post. Sorry.


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The Firecracker
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« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2007, 09:56:48 AM »

Forgot to mention Liam Neeson left half-way through the concert and never returned.
I had made a joke to Darrel saying that "look we have better seats than Liam Neeson!". I wonder if Neeson heard this, got angry, and left. Grin

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« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2007, 10:12:44 AM »

Thanks for your report, Firecracker. Souds like some celebs are fans of our maestro too. You say there are too many strings but you think the orchestration was unbanlanced? I read that there were hundred in the chorus. Wasn't that overwhelmingly blissful? And how was the soprano for OUTIW and OUTIA?

Everybody says the concert was short. Even NY Times. And he kept walking off the stage? Maybe Morricone doesn't have stamina for a long concert anymore. But I hope that's not the case.


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SeanSeanSean
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« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2007, 11:05:51 AM »

Having been waiting for this event for months, I was at the NYC concert on Saturday.
True, the concert was short, a mere 2 hours. Starting at 8h10PM and ending at 9h40PM. Three Encores, later the concert was over a little after 10PM. It is unfortunate that he did not perform other numbers in the Encores. He repeated some numbers such as Ecstasy of gold.
I came all the way from Montréal to be at this once in a lifetime event.
I got hooked on Ennio’s music way back in the 60’s and have remained a fan ever since. I never thought I would ever see him in concert, thinking he was simply a studio musician. I can even say some of his music is entwined in major emotional events in my life. When I hear OUATITW, I am reminded of my true love. On Saturday when Susanna began her solo in Jill’s theme, a tear came to my eye. OUATTR/DYS, evokes the loss of my true love. Cinema Paradiso, my mother’s death and the Death theme from the Untouchables, an unfulfilled love in silence.
At the concert, I wasn’t as emotionally involved as I thought I would be. Maybe it is when I compare it to the Munich concert in 2004. I bought the DVD a few months ago and viewed it quite a few times. On Saturday I found myself appreciating the orchestration more than anything else. I had a great seat in the 6th row front and center. I had Susanna’s face and Ennio’s back in front of me, most of the time. Being so close in front, I couldn’t see the brass section in action, which was a pity. Two beauties caught my eye though: a blonde violinist and an Asian chorus singer were breathtaking.
I thought the US concert would have been different from the Munich concert. But it was quite similar without Cockey’s song. I hoped he would have stressed the western themes for the American audience, but no. It would have been great to hear: tunes from FAFDM and My name is Nobody, and from OUATITW: As a judgment and Addio Cheyenne, among others. In his defense, the orchestra was a mix of Italian and American performers, so he probably didn’t have time since the London concert in December to rehearse new numbers with this group.
Anecdotes:
There was tension in the room, when Ennio first left the stage after about the 4th number. He returned holding Susanna’s hand. What a relief;
Ennio seemed quite fit, but showed his age when moving around. In response to applause Ennio turned to bow to the audience, holding on to the rail behind him (for dear life apparently).
At one point Ennio almost broke his foot, when he stepped down from his podium to ask Susanna what someone had yelled out. Something like Viva Ennio!
After the concert, a 6yo girl who was sitting in my row, who obviously enjoyed her experience by yelling Ennio! Ennio! Came by the stage and Ennio greeted her and embraced her. A nice touch. You can bet she will remember her experience all her life and possibly pass on her love for Ennio's music to her children. It is great to think that Ennio's music might resonate with people beyond 2050.
Didn’t see any Celebs, except for Kent Nagano the Montréal symphonic orchestra conductor. But who else but me could have recognized him?
All in all, I enjoyed the concert. Well worth my trip. Enjoyed my short stay in Manhattan also.
Viva Morricone!

« Last Edit: February 05, 2007, 03:18:23 PM by SeanSeanSean » Logged

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« Reply #19 on: February 05, 2007, 01:19:27 PM »

Well.Guys, I'm sitting here at JFK ready for my 3000 mile journey home. Was it worth it? You bet it was. OK, it was a shorter concert but similar in length to the last one in London. Prior to that it was always about 3 hours with an interval but don't forget Ennio is 78 now. Sorry, I didn't get to meet any of you but I had a prior arrangement with long-time EM fellow-fans some going back 9 years. We had a ball.
I'm not going to even try to compare the NYC concert with others. It was a great and never-to-be-forgotten night. I hope all who attended enjoyed it as much as I did.

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The Peacemaker
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« Reply #20 on: February 05, 2007, 02:53:12 PM »

@ Firecracker:  I didn't get the impression that he didn't want to be there. He is just very formal and that's the way he does things I guess. He must've felt great with everyone cheering him on like that.


I can tell you weren't yourself. You were quiet ( FC quiet? Normal? That's not the FC we all know and love  Wink  ) plus with the coughing I can tell you had a Flu or something. My dad kept asking me " Is he alright? He seems very sick. I hope everything's okay. " And yes, me and my dad have a crazy sense of humor. Lunacy runs in my family, I guess.  Roll Eyes

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« Reply #21 on: February 05, 2007, 02:56:51 PM »

There was something that I found hilarious. In the beginning when the orchestra and choir had taken their seats and the lights dimmed down, a random man in a suit walked onto the stage carrying Ennio's music book and everyone started to applaud wildly because they all thought it was Ennio!

He walked away after he put down the book at Ennio's podieum and he shrugged his shoulders as if to say " Whaddya want from me? " and everyone laughed.


That could've ticked off Morricone alittle bit.  Grin

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SeanSeanSean
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« Reply #22 on: February 05, 2007, 03:22:19 PM »

Found this new addition on Youtube the 3rd Encore:


Brings back the experience....

BTW, Ennio is fairly distant with the audience but that is how he is according to legend. As is another favorite of mine: Bob Dylan.

As for Ennio's appeal, did you know a Hommage to Morricone CD is coming out in the spring? The performers are Bruce Springsteen, Herbie Hancock, Céline Dion, Quincy Jones among others. Can you imagine a broader scope than that!?

« Last Edit: February 05, 2007, 03:35:24 PM by SeanSeanSean » Logged

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« Reply #23 on: February 05, 2007, 03:44:55 PM »

It's amazing, somebody actually shot the video! Hey Peacemaker, where's your video?

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« Reply #24 on: February 05, 2007, 04:53:14 PM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/05/arts/music/05morr.html?ref=music

Fistful of Themes, No Clips, From a Soundtrack Maestro
             
 
By STEPHEN HOLDEN
Published: February 5, 2007, NY Times

If the Italian composer Ennio Morricone has a musical signature, it is probably the wild-turkey squawk of the ocarina in his theme music from the 1966 spaghetti western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.” That squawk, an anarchic battle cry that evokes a warped yodel and is sounded over martial equestrian drum rolls, was heard again on Saturday evening at Radio City Music Hall, where Mr. Morricone conducted 200 musicians performing excerpts from his film scores. Although he has written music for 400 movies, the musicians had prepared so little material that the last fourth of the two-hour event billed as “Morricone in Concert” was devoted to reprises of highlights from the previous 90 minutes.

In sheer size, the forces arrayed onstage were impressive: the Roma Sinfonietta of about 100 was augmented by the Canticum Novum Singers, an ensemble of roughly the same size. The solemnly presented event was the latest salvo in an international Morricone blitz whose climax will be an honorary Oscar later this month. (Over the years he has been nominated five times.)

By most measures this was a strange event: frustratingly short, the music unaccompanied by film clips or any other images. Although a program listed the selections, there were no annotations and no introductions to the themes, which were grouped in blocks with titles like “The Modernity of Myth in Sergio Leone’s Cinema” and “Social Cinema.” The orchestrations were conspicuously billed as “the same as the original soundtracks.”

What that meant acoustically was a blend of the natural sound of a large string orchestra with instruments like a heavily amplified harp. If the sound was passable, it was texturally thin, and it all seemed manipulated on a mixing board: unfortunate for a composer of some of the most voluptuous movie music ever created.

If it’s odd that Mr. Morricone’s music for westerns, which constitutes less than 10 percent of his output, has been so fetishized, while his more overtly symphonic film music has been relatively ignored, it’s understandable from an American point of view. His scores for Sergio Leone westerns revolutionized the vocabulary of western movie music standardized by Hollywood.

His introduction of rock ’n’ roll guitar descended from surf music out of Duane Eddy was an American cultural export. And the resulting hybrid, a slightly cheesy mixture of rock ’n’ roll and European formality, created a dramatic tension that energized movie music around the world.

Without the synergy between music and images that a visual component would have provided, Mr. Morricone’s Mediterranean variant on that European formality loomed large. If the musical forces were widescreen in size, the textures were simple and emphasized transparency and repetition. Melodic themes were short and tuneful, with the strings often doubled by a soprano (Susanna Rigacci) singing without words.

The romantic, contemplative side of Mr. Morricone’s film music found its richest expression in excerpts from the movies “Cinema Paradiso” and “Malèna,” in which he evokes an Old World nostalgia in sweet, dreamy passages that often feature a single wind instrument plaintively standing in for a character looking back. This particular emotional atmosphere is a specialty of Mr. Morricone, whose scores for “Bugsy” and “Lolita” locate the yearning little boy inside the corrupted adult. Unfortunately neither score, nor the great end title theme from “In the Line of Fire,” was included in the program.

What we heard of that style would also have been better served had the scores been rearranged as suites with themes and variations that evoked a narrative. This was also true of the concert’s abbreviated final block of three themes from “The Mission,” the 1986 film for which Mr. Morricone wrote one of his finest scores. For the few minutes it lasted, this pop pastiche of Mahler’s Second Symphony sounded magnificent, but it was over almost before it began.


« Last Edit: February 05, 2007, 04:57:37 PM by cigar joe » Logged

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« Reply #25 on: February 05, 2007, 06:31:51 PM »

Over here in Kangaroo Land we don't get "blue plate specials" like this.
After watching Euro versions of the same concert content (which i've already commented on) my keeness for Morricone is a little sullied.
Big orchestra have a rather distant, impersonal quality at the best of times, and i really think most of Morricone's music is more suited to "chamber "style treatment.
The comments posted here about the recent NYC concert come as no suprise at all.
The success of the music for SL westerns was largely due to a coupla musos - the "whistler" and the "wraith-like" soprano.
Master strokes of the first order.
Second to these two essentials, are the guitarist and the trumpeter.
I'm sorry, as i do not remember their names.
These muso's added that X factor to Morricone's scores. This would be lacking when a standard large orchestra is used for the same material.
We're lucky we have the original recordings of these fabulous players, as they are the finest examples of individual talent ever put on a soundtrack.
If all these individuals were alive and performing with Morricone, i would have flown to NYC and been at the concert with all of you.
You would have easily recognised me, i would have been standing, cheering after each piece, and at the end, been seen to do hand stands in the center aisle shouting "Bravo!!! Bravo!!!"
(probably along with everyone else there).

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cigar joe
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« Reply #26 on: February 05, 2007, 10:02:12 PM »

hey guys guess who else was at Virgils:

http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?disc=160642;article=146295;title=Spaghetti%20Western%20Web%20Board

John Nudge
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One word -- fantastic!

Il Maestro encored three times. Once, a repeat of Ecstasy of Gold.

Ally, Eric, Franco Cleef, Addie, Bill and Mo, Pat Cleary, all joined the festivities.

I'm still in shock.


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« Reply #27 on: February 05, 2007, 10:24:22 PM »

Thank you the NY Article CJ!!

You met John Nudge and Addie too? I know them both. Especially Addie is a long time friend of mine. I really wish I were there too!!

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« Reply #28 on: February 06, 2007, 02:51:56 PM »

Hey Peacemaker, where's your video?

You mean the western?

I took that down because I couldn't stand looking at the horribly fake opening scene. Remember, I'm reshooting it next month with props.

The credits, however, will remain in the new version.

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« Reply #29 on: February 06, 2007, 03:43:23 PM »

Actually, I meant a video from the Morricone concert at RCMH. As a joke, I was going to ask you to shoot the concert before you went, but somebody actually shot. 

But I'm glad to know that you're gonna keep that beautiful train sequence for the credits. 

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