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: Flat Out Great Pictures  ( 111167 )
Beebs
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« : February 07, 2007, 06:13:31 PM »

What are some pictures you just flat out love?






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« #1 : February 07, 2007, 06:40:52 PM »

I really like Holbein's portrait of Sir Thomas More - it just conveys perfectly his dignity, intelligence, and fortitude.  No, he was not a perfect man, but an admirable one nonetheless (unless you're a hardcore Protestant).



I'll come up with more later, but I'm pressed for time. . .



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Jon1
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« #2 : February 07, 2007, 08:50:57 PM »

Classic political poster


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« #3 : February 07, 2007, 10:48:14 PM »

This is the ultimate mercy expressed in the history of Japanese art. "Avalokitesvara as a Merciful Mother" by Hogai Kano (1828-1888). Its colors and details are simply splendid. The artist must have been in a state of nirvana when he painted this. 



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« #4 : February 07, 2007, 11:14:00 PM »

My two favourite pictures happen to be two watercolour illustrations made by two different people to the same story by J.R.R. Tolkien. I found them both on the internet.

"Tuor follows Voronwë" by Peter Xavier Price.



"Voronwë in Nan-tathren" by Anke Eissmann



You can also add my avatar to the list. :)




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« #5 : February 08, 2007, 09:06:23 AM »

There are just too many to post here, but try this link: http://www.nbc.com/Deal_or_No_Deal/models/index.shtml



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« #6 : February 08, 2007, 09:38:58 AM »

Yes, they are beautiful to behold too.  ;D


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« #7 : February 09, 2007, 08:03:36 AM »

And can you name them all? I was watching Deal or No Deal the other night and I realized, to my shame, that I could only remember one of their names. This is, I know, unAmerican, but I'm gonna study hard starting today until I've got all 26 memorized.



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« #8 : February 09, 2007, 11:26:13 AM »

I feel very unAmerican. I know none of them. I wish I could watch the program, but it's risky to watch this kind of program when you are married.


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« #9 : February 09, 2007, 04:37:49 PM »

I'm also something of a fan of Salvador Dali - his pictures are too weird for words, but just plain fascinating.  I don't have any particular favorites, though there are some I'm not fond of.



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« #10 : February 09, 2007, 05:01:52 PM »

I've always wondered about Dali....was he a fascist in the Spanish Civil war?

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« #11 : February 09, 2007, 05:37:35 PM »

I've always wondered about Dali....was he a fascist in the Spanish Civil war?

He was definitely a fascist, don't know if he actually fought in the war though.



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« #12 : February 09, 2007, 06:46:05 PM »

Dali made statements supporting Franco's Fascist regime, but the idea of him fighting in the Civil War (or anywhere else for that matter) is laughable. He was a posturing fool, posessing superb painting techniques and masterful drawing skills  who made a few memorable images. The vast majority of his output was junk however, reflecting his obsession with masturbation.  His house in Figueres in North Eastern Spain is full of the most hidious and vulgar trash. In a way it is a mirror of Dali himself, fascinating on the ouside, but with an interior full of disintegrating tinsle. He died a very sad, painful and lonely death there.

The two film's he is constantly credited with as works of genius were of course largely the work of Luis Bunuel. His collaboration with Hitchcock was just embarrassing for both men.

« : February 09, 2007, 06:47:58 PM Juan Miranda »

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« #13 : February 10, 2007, 07:44:03 PM »

I really like Holbein's portrait of Sir Thomas More - it just conveys perfectly his dignity, intelligence, and fortitude.

I get the impression you are thinking about the character portrayed in A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS, rather than seeing the image you have posted. Painted in 1527, Moore is depicted as an extraordinaryly wealthy courtier, dressed in fine fur lined velvet robes (which would have cost an absolute fortune then) singling him out as a person of wealth and power. He is represented in an ambigous, possibly exterior space, with what seems like a tent flap blowing open in the backgraound, hinting perhaps at his travels as a King's ambassador (Holbien's greatest surviving picture is arguably THE AMBASSADORS). Most tellingly, right at the centre of the portrait is a very large Tudor Rose hung round Moore's neck, the symbol of Henry VIII, a badge of his trust in Moore, Moore's alligence to Henry and a sign of Moore's authority as a representative of the King.

It would be six years after this painting was made that Moore would fall out with Henry, and he spent that period brutally putting people to death over such stupid and idiotic points of theology which would eventually see his own undoing. None of this is present however in Holbein's portrait of a rich, powerful and loyal servant of a Tudor king. A picture showing a man of "dignity, intelligence, and fortitude"? I don't see that in this image. Perhaps where Holbien's genius lies (and which makes his surviving pictures seem so "modern") is that he makes all such loyal servants appear just a little bit queasy and nervous?


Jon1
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« #14 : February 10, 2007, 08:13:38 PM »

One of my friends has a very large cloth print of this hanging in his room, always have liked the painting.


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