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Author Topic: Flat Out Great Pictures  (Read 100124 times)
Jon1
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« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2007, 08:24:29 PM »

Say what you want about Che....that he was dedicated to a false ideology, that he was less than forgiving of his political prisoners....whatever, I'll probably agree with you.  But this image is is iconic, and I think it's a "Flat Out Great Picture".  You go to Latin America today and you will see this picture plastered everywhere....on murals, on bumper stickers, etc.  It's not an endorsement of Marxist-Leninism....but more a general symbol of protest of U.S. hegemony in the region, Latin American unity, etc.



For me I guess, it represents this sort of spirit of defiance and rebellion that is just so much bigger than Che, his ideology, or any one of us.  I dig it, what can I say.

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« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2007, 09:13:19 PM »

You go to Latin America today and you will see this picture plastered everywhere....on murals, on bumper stickers, etc. 





Perhaps amongst the youth crowd who have no real idea who Che was or what he was about, but tell any cuban over the age of 40 that Che was a hero and they will tell you to "f uck off".

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« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2007, 09:18:33 PM »









The two pictures above convey more coolness than any other picture I have yet to see on this thread.

And Sartana would kick Che in the balls (if he had any).

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« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2007, 10:46:13 PM »

One of my friends has a very large cloth print of this hanging in his room, always have liked the painting.



That's probably the most famous artwork of Hokusai. He created 36 images with Mount Fuji as a series. This is one of them. I love this artwork too. In fact I used the wave in this image in one of my poster designs.

   

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Jon1
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« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2007, 06:26:04 AM »


Perhaps amongst the youth crowd who have no real idea who Che was or what he was about, but tell any cuban over the age of 40 that Che was a hero and they will tell you to "f uck off".

Well I've never been to Cuba....and if you're speaking of the Miami Cuban exile community that's going to be a very different story than Cuba itself.  But anyway, all I can really speak of is Peru, where I went.....and this image is everywhere.  As I've said before, I don't think it has anything to do with an endorsement of Che or his ideology.

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« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2007, 06:42:44 AM »

I get the impression you are thinking about the character portrayed in A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS, rather than seeing the image you have posted. Painted in 1527, Moore is depicted as an extraordinaryly wealthy courtier, dressed in fine fur lined velvet robes (which would have cost an absolute fortune then) singling him out as a person of wealth and power. He is represented in an ambigous, possibly exterior space, with what seems like a tent flap blowing open in the backgraound, hinting perhaps at his travels as a King's ambassador (Holbien's greatest surviving picture is arguably THE AMBASSADORS). Most tellingly, right at the centre of the portrait is a very large Tudor Rose hung round Moore's neck, the symbol of Henry VIII, a badge of his trust in Moore, Moore's alligence to Henry and a sign of Moore's authority as a representative of the King.

I can only disagree.  It is a wonderful picture.

Quote
It would be six years after this painting was made that Moore would fall out with Henry, and he spent that period brutally putting people to death over such stupid and idiotic points of theology which would eventually see his own undoing. None of this is present however in Holbein's portrait of a rich, powerful and loyal servant of a Tudor king. A picture showing a man of "dignity, intelligence, and fortitude"? I don't see that in this image. Perhaps where Holbien's genius lies (and which makes his surviving pictures seem so "modern") is that he makes all such loyal servants appear just a little bit queasy and nervous?

This is very true.  More, like pretty much everyone in that time period, was a religious bigot, to be polite.  Then again, pretty much any argument between different Christian groups is based on "stupid and idiotic points of theology" in my eyes, as an agnostic.  It is interesting however that Robert Bolt, who was an atheist, felt that More - a religious zealot who was also a rather nasty misogynist from what I understand, and reportedly had a torture chamber in his house - was an admirable figure to write about.  I will never deny More's failings and sins as a person, but I agree that he is worth remembering for his stand.  Unlike most of the other martyrs of the time, he loved Henry as a friend and refused to speak out against him because he knew the reprecussions for England would be.  More's only crime (well, that he could have been prosecuted for - going after Protestants wasn't likely to get him beheaded in Henrican England) was thinking differently from the King.

Of course, Holbein was a talented artist who pretty much conveyed what he wanted of the subjects.  Ever see his portrait of Thomas Cromwell?



Now if that's not a nasty-looking individual, I don't know who is.

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« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2007, 06:46:20 AM »

Well I've never been to Cuba....and if you're speaking of the Miami Cuban exile community that's going to be a very different story than Cuba itself.  But anyway, all I can really speak of is Peru, where I went.....and this image is everywhere.  As I've said before, I don't think it has anything to do with an endorsement of Che or his ideology.

Peru, so far as I know, never actually had to suffer his presence.

Guevarra was a mass-murdering Stalinist who wasn't even competent as a military leader, if you take a closer look at his record.  Castro didn't even care for him, one of the reasons why Che ended up in Angola and Bolivia before being killed. 

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« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2007, 06:54:59 AM »

Peru, so far as I know, never actually had to suffer his presence.

According to Motorcycle Diaries (if that film is right), he was there as young man, before his revolutionary times.


Another picture I love. Albrecht Dürer's depiction of his dream. Quick watercolour study, I love it because it's so interesting to see this picture among his detailled works.


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« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2007, 06:57:36 AM »

His collaboration with Hitchcock was just embarrassing for both men.

You don't like the dream sequence in Spellbound or the whole film? I adore that film, whilst it's no where near Hitch's best it still contains this wonderful almost 'woozy' atmosphere through all of it. And anything with Ingrid Bergman....

I guess my favourite pictures would be all my original posters I guess because of their rarity (I own a few that have only come up once for sale or for auction and that was mine). I've got a wonderful blow up photo of Grand Central Station sitting of my study desk and I am surrounded by images of the New York Skyline.

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Jon1
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« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2007, 08:11:36 AM »

Peru, so far as I know, never actually had to suffer his presence.

Guevarra was a mass-murdering Stalinist who wasn't even competent as a military leader, if you take a closer look at his record.  Castro didn't even care for him, one of the reasons why Che ended up in Angola and Bolivia before being killed. 
Right, but Peru has suffered (and still suffers, I believe) the presence of the Shining Path....a Marxist terrorist/insurgent organization.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shining_Path
Yet, Che's face is still everywhere.

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Jon1
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« Reply #25 on: February 11, 2007, 08:18:13 AM »

Peru, so far as I know, never actually had to suffer his presence.

Guevarra was a mass-murdering Stalinist who wasn't even competent as a military leader, if you take a closer look at his record.  Castro didn't even care for him, one of the reasons why Che ended up in Angola and Bolivia before being killed. 
And Groggy....I remember from our Hiroshima discussions, you were always one for context and I quite agree.  When you're talking about him being a mass murderer, I assume you're talking about his summary executions of prisoners....and in the context of the Cold war in Latin America, my guess is that this "mass murder" you're talking about on Guevara's part is very, very tame compared to that perpetrated by the CIA and it's lackeys in countries such as Chile, Brazil, Argentina, etc. Ever heard of the "the disapeared"?  Of course you have....you're on some history quiz game show!  (If you haven't here's a quick taste: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Condor )

« Last Edit: February 11, 2007, 08:22:10 AM by Jon1 » Logged
Beebs
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« Reply #26 on: February 11, 2007, 08:35:07 AM »

Che's popularity isn't iconic as much as ironic. Like you said, people today barely know what he was about. My opinion of Che:

He was a sadist, mass murdering lunatic. I agree with Groggy on that one.





Just a little joke someon will hopefully appreciate Grin

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Jon1
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« Reply #27 on: February 11, 2007, 09:12:44 AM »

I've actually seen those before.....my opinion basically boils down to this:

He was a heroic guy willing to dedicate and ultimately lose his life toward what he thought was the betterment of his people.  If you can agree with that, I think he deserves everybody's respect.  I don't agree with his Marxist-Leninism, but I think Cuba at least is better under Castro than Batista.

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« Reply #28 on: February 11, 2007, 11:17:44 AM »

I've posted pictures of my posters (which are my flat out great pictures) before so I thought I'd post pics of the ones that are on my 'next to buy' list which I think look incredible.

Hitchcock



Continuing the Spellbound theme  Wink I would love to own this original Australian One sheet. I love the two characters standing out against the enveloping black with the glinting razor hinting danger. Shame about the censor mark being where it it but I still think it's a wonderful poster



This original Rear Window Australian Daybill has just great iconic artwork and I would love to own it.



This original The Birds Australian Daybill has a great image of Tippi being attacked by the birds and is rather vibrant

Film Noir



This original Australian Daybill for the classic 'lost' noir Blonde Ice has great artwork and is also supposed to be the only one in existance.



I just love the stark artwork on this original Australian One Sheet for the classic Jules Dassin Noir Theives Highway



The brilliant Out Of The Past is expertly represented by the beautiful artwork on this original Australian Daybill



Another great Mitchum Noir The Racket here again represented by great artwork on the original Australian Daybill

Westerns



An Original Australian Daybill for the re-release of Shane in the late 50's



An original Australian Daybill for the John Ford Classic The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

And finally....



A very rare and valuable original Australian Daybill for the Sci-Fi classic, The Day The Earth Stood Still

I am also trying to track down as original Australian Daybill for The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly but was unable to find a picture to post

« Last Edit: February 11, 2007, 12:40:55 PM by Leone Admirer » Logged

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Tim
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« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2007, 11:38:15 AM »

  With all this Che Guevarra talk (I know its a little off-topic), I thought I'd ask....anyone seen the 1969 movie Che! ?  Omar Sharif plays Che, and imdb has it at a 3.4 rating out of 180 votes, ouch Shocked.  But it looks interesting, maybe one of those "so bad it's good" type movies, but with Sharif, Jack Palance, Woody Strode, Barbara Luna, Frank Silvera, it looks like its worth a watch.

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