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Author Topic: "God Save the Queen" at 30  (Read 3376 times)
dave jenkins
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« on: May 19, 2007, 02:05:54 PM »

Released by Virgin Records in May of ’77, this record rocketed to #1 (unofficially) in the UK and inaugurated the Summer of Hate (A&M had earlier pressed the single but immediately deleted it). An enormous provocation at the time, its lasting influence would be artistic rather than political as the anthem (and the Pistol’s success) inspired a new wave of musicians (the Class of ’78). The Sex Pistols did not invent punk, of course, but they popularized it as no one else could have done.

Summer of Hate (and aftermath)

May- “God Save the Queen” / Clash: “Remote Control”/ Stranglers: “Peaches” [both the Clash and the Stranglers had released their first albums in April] / Jam: In the City

July- “Pretty Vacant” / Stranglers: “Something Better Change” / Jam: “All Around the World”

Sep- Clash: “Complete Control”/ Stranglers: “No More Heroes”

Oct- “Holidays in the Sun” / Jam: “The Modern World” / Stranglers: No More Heroes

Nov- Never Mind the Bullocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols / Jam: This is the Modern World / Wire: Pink Flag

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Banjo
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« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2007, 04:54:31 PM »

Statesise come great debut albums from:-

 Television:Marquee Moon Feb77

 Talking Heads :1977  July 77

 Iggy Pop:The Idiot  April 77

Back in the UK:-

 The Damned debut album:Damned,Damned,Damned :April 77

Buzzcocks debut EP:Spiral Scratch:Jan 77





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franksgrandson
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« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2007, 05:54:09 PM »

Hey guys this shows my age, I worked for the Stranglers and prior to doing that I used to go down to see them in the Hope and Anchor pub in Upper Street Islington Steve Jones and Paul Cook from the Pistols used to turn up and Jet Black the stranglers drummer used to give Paul Cook the Pistols drummer tips on how to play.
Also Joe Strummer used to be around a lot when he had a band called the 101ers he always used to go on about how he wanted a band like the stranglers, he was soon to get his wish (god bless him), others that used to turn up for the Stranglers were Captain Sensible of the Damed, Bruce Springsteen, Chrissie Hynde, Artur Basic of the Lurkers.
The arguments as to which side of the Atlantic punk came from will never be solved, musically I would say New York, it never really took off in the States as the social conditions in New York at the time just were not representative of America as a whole, whilst the UK was in the crapper all over and we had The Sex Pistols, The Stranglers,The Damned and the Clash along with a host of other great Punk bands like 999, UK Subs, The Jam, Stiff Little Fingers, Sham 69 and the Vibrators among many others.
In the USA only the Ramones held steady, Blondie mellowed to soon and the Dead Kennadys came just a little to late also Punk in America was more a fashion where's in the UK it was Political, a rage from the kids who had nothing and were never going to have anything if it was left to our elders also we had a figure head in the Queen to shout our rage at.
Hell it was a great time, I would love to go back and experience it all over again.

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« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2007, 10:33:19 PM »

'60's punk was sometime great, the '70's one was something you could sleep to. Afro

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Banjo
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« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2007, 04:40:49 AM »

You mean The Stooges and the MC5 Titoli?

I was half expecting Franksgrandson to show up here with his excellent first hand insight into UK punk. Afro

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« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2007, 10:16:04 AM »

Banjo I am humble at your words.
What is to add about the late seventies is the absolute deluge of great music and I talk not only of Punk, Bryan Frerry, Bowie, Meat Loaf among others as well as some of the great disco tracks, this wave of great music kept comming till the late eighties when we saw the emergence of rap and hip hop which totally destroyed efforts by talented artists from around the world.
Basically what happened was that the DJs out their decided that they wanted a slice of the action and went into self promotion with sampling and techno where's before they were the sad twats that got a slap if they did not put the right music on.
Also Rap and Hip hop gave a whole raft of untalented idiots the chance to get in the charts. now I know some would say that matches what punk did, but here they are very wrong, there was not one Punk band who could not play an instument and even if they started as one chord wonders they soon were very skilled at their art.
Also very disturbing is the scenceless promotion of violence,drugs and using women as sex objects within Rap, this is extreme and has no focus apart from being the biggest arsehole in the gang.
Other types of music also speak of violence but it tends to be based on situations where action and fighting is needed, more a reportage than open declaration of macho aggression.
Music needs a real new style to move it on now a new act that will capture immaginations, we have only seen this on a few occasions with Elvis, The Beatles and the Sex Pistols. 

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« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2007, 11:35:04 AM »

Banjo I am humble at your words.
What is to add about the late seventies is the absolute deluge of great music and I talk not only of Punk, Bryan Frerry, Bowie, Meat Loaf among others as well as some of the great disco tracks, this wave of great music kept comming till the late eighties when we saw the emergence of rap and hip hop which totally destroyed efforts by talented artists from around the world.
Basically what happened was that the DJs out their decided that they wanted a slice of the action and went into self promotion with sampling and techno where's before they were the sad twats that got a slap if they did not put the right music on.
Also Rap and Hip hop gave a whole raft of untalented idiots the chance to get in the charts. now I know some would say that matches what punk did, but here they are very wrong, there was not one Punk band who could not play an instument and even if they started as one chord wonders they soon were very skilled at their art.
Also very disturbing is the scenceless promotion of violence,drugs and using women as sex objects within Rap, this is extreme and has no focus apart from being the biggest arsehole in the gang.
Other types of music also speak of violence but it tends to be based on situations where action and fighting is needed, more a reportage than open declaration of macho aggression.
Music needs a real new style to move it on now a new act that will capture immaginations, we have only seen this on a few occasions with Elvis, The Beatles and the Sex Pistols. 


"Only sick music makes money today."

   --Friedrich Nietzche, 1888

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Eric
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« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2007, 05:22:07 PM »

Only tangentially related, but I'm watching my Essential Clash DVD, and the footage of them preparing for Bonds is set to Morricone's Carillion and Sixty Seconds to What? !!!

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franksgrandson
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« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2007, 04:48:09 AM »

The Clash really got into Spags, specially Joe Strummer, after the Clash called it a day he went on to form the Mescaraloes and released an LP caller Walker which is Spag all the way through well worth a listen.
Seems lots of Punks got bit by Leone 999 recorded the greatest Morricone rock tribute in a ditty called Obssessed this is a must to check out, knowing Nick Cash I was told he wrote the song while drunk one night on tour in the states watching For A Few Dollars More.

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Eric
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« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2007, 11:10:26 AM »

That album's a good one. Strummer was also in the sort-of spaghetti-ish Alex Cox inside joke Straight to Hell.

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dave jenkins
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« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2007, 11:51:51 AM »

And Big Audio Dynamite had that song that used the lines from Tuco's sentence (before hanging) as part of the composition...

EDIT: I think it was "Medicine Show."

« Last Edit: May 21, 2007, 12:37:14 PM by dave jenkins » Logged


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Banjo
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« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2007, 04:40:23 PM »

I'm too young to have caught Joe Strummer live with The Clash but fortunately i was lucky enough to catch him fronting the Pogues a few years later.A very charasmatic,inspiring,great entertainer. Afro

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