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Author Topic: Seven Guns for the MacGregors (1965)  (Read 10783 times)
Groggy
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« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2011, 10:31:10 AM »

Maybe someone should first check what Frayling actually wrote.

At least the scores he wrote for Leone (including Nobody) are the best and most varied. Followed by those for Corbucci (except the last 2, which are pretty lazy), then Sollima, then the rest he did in the SW realm, which is not as impressive and not as remarkable. But also not bad compared to usual SW score.
Other composers have also done some great work in the genre.

I don't know. I'd say Death Rides a Horse is one of his best non-Leone scores.

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drinkanddestroy
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« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2011, 11:02:41 AM »

when i get back home I will check out the book again and quote Frayling's exact words

« Last Edit: August 14, 2011, 09:52:32 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

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« Reply #17 on: August 09, 2011, 02:46:55 PM »

I don't know. I'd say Death Rides a Horse is one of his best non-Leone scores.

I think it is nothing special, just like the film.

There was this disharmonious riding theme, apart from that I remember nothing.

I personally also like his 2 Provvidenza scores. Some may also mention Tessari's Ringo films, but that's more conventional sounding stuff imo.

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« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2011, 09:51:01 PM »

ok, here are Frayling's exact words, from the very last sentence on p. 165 of Spaghetti Westerns, which, let's remember, was published in 1981 :

"Since the 'Dollars' trilogy, Morricone's work for other directors -- over thirty-five Westerns, and many more soundtracks in other genres -- has seldom matched up to his Leone scores, in either invention or appropriateness -- notable exceptions being the Pontecorvo films The Battle of Algiers and Queimada, and Bertolucci's 1900. In fact, some of Morricone's musical themes and ideas, after rejection by Leone, tend to turn up  -- re-arranged by Bruno Nicolai -- in other Italian Westerns where they simply become obtrusive. Although more than one music critic has categorised Ennio Morricone as a ' "B" feature musician', it seems clear that the relationship between director and composerin this particular case proved unusually fruitful, on a par with the relationships between Franju and Jarre, Truffaut and Delerue, Fellini and Rota, or Demy and Legrand."

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« Reply #19 on: August 14, 2011, 09:59:09 PM »

I would doubt Ennio did the lyrics, but I couldn't find any helpful info online. I have that same CD so maybe I can check after work.

I just checked that cd booklet. (Unfortunately, they do not write the full song lyrics, but) it says that the lyrics to March of the MacGregors were by Maurizio Attanasio; the lyrics to A Gringo like Me were by Carol Danell; th lyrics to Lonesome Billy were by Peter Tavis (who was also the vocalist for Loneseome Billy and A Gringo Like Me)

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« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2011, 06:36:10 AM »

"Since the 'Dollars' trilogy, Morricone's work for other directors -- over thirty-five Westerns, and many more soundtracks in other genres -- has seldom matchged up to his Leone scores, in either invention or appropriateness -- notable exceptions being the Pontecorvo films The Battle of Algiers and Queimada, and Bertolucci's 1900. In fact, some of Morricone's musical themes and ideas, after rejection by Leone, tend to turn up  -- re-arranged by Bruno Nicolai -- in other Italian Westerns where they simply become obtrusive. Although more than one music critic has categorised Ennio Morricone as a ' "B" feature musician', it seems clear that the relationship between director and composerin this particular case proved unusually fruitful, on a par with the relationships between Franju and Jarre, Truffaut and Delerue, Fellini and Rota, or Demy and Legrand."

Well, I think most would agree that it's very hard for Morricone to reach his work for Leone. But he did have some great scores independent of Sergio: Death Rides a Horse, The Big Gundown, A Professional Gun, Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion, The Battle of Algiers, The Mission, Cinema Paradiso, just off-hand. That he achieved a unique level of creative synthesis with Leone is undeniable; to say he's just a "B feature musician" is demeaning and false.

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« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2011, 06:50:30 AM »

Well, I think most would agree that it's very hard for Morricone to reach his work for Leone. But he did have some great scores independent of Sergio: Death Rides a Horse, The Big Gundown, A Professional Gun, Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion, The Battle of Algiers, The Mission, Cinema Paradiso, just off-hand. That he achieved a unique level of creative synthesis with Leone is undeniable; to say he's just a "B feature musician" is demeaning and false.

I don't think I have seen any pre-1981 non-Leone films with Morricone scores other than Two Mules for Sister Sara, so I cannot personally agree or disagree with Frayling's statement.

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« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2011, 09:57:41 AM »

He would probably not make such a statement today. In fact, if pressed, he might be willing to retract or modify the statement. Morricone's rep has skyrocketed since '81.

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« Reply #23 on: August 15, 2011, 11:31:13 AM »

He would probably not make such a statement today. In fact, if pressed, he might be willing to retract or modify the statement. Morricone's rep has skyrocketed since '81.

That would be the fair thing to do, IMO.

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« Reply #24 on: August 15, 2011, 12:59:52 PM »

That would be the fair thing to do, IMO.

Nah. If he believes it he oughtn't modify his opinion to agree with everyone else.

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« Reply #25 on: August 15, 2011, 06:31:52 PM »

Nah. If he believes it he oughtn't modify his opinion to agree with everyone else.

Sure. Like everybody else, Mr. Frayling is entitled to his opinion. But when Il Maestro conducts a live performance be it in Chile, or in Spain, or in the US, or in Poland, or in Italy (you name it) and the theatres are full, perhaps there is something special in his music regardless of what one person's opinion may be. And let us remember that even today the biggest Morricone hits are still pre-1981 (Ecstasy of Gold, Once Upon a Time in the West, etc).

Like Frayling's, this is just my opinion.  Cheesy Wink

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« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2012, 03:08:53 AM »

Sure. Like everybody else, Mr. Frayling is entitled to his opinion. But when Il Maestro conducts a live performance be it in Chile, or in Spain, or in the US, or in Poland, or in Italy (you name it) and the theatres are full, perhaps there is something special in his music regardless of what one person's opinion may be. And let us remember that even today the biggest Morricone hits are still pre-1981 (Ecstasy of Gold, Once Upon a Time in the West, etc).

Like Frayling's, this is just my opinion.  Cheesy Wink


 Grin Grin Grin

Sorry pal, but it is obvious that you either didn't read the quote by Frayling or you completely misunderstood it.
Again, Frayling said (in 1981) that Morricone's non-Leone music has seldom matched his work with Leone.
Now you respond, as some sort of rebuttal to that, by saying that A) Morricone's concerts are packed; and that B) Morricone's most popular hits are his pre-1981 work with Leone.

I'd be really impressed if you can explain how that is in any way, shape, or form,  a rebuttal/response to Frayling's statement.

You either did not read the statement by Frayling or you completely misunderstood it  Roll Eyes




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« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2012, 03:16:19 PM »


 Grin Grin Grin

Sorry pal, but it is obvious that you either didn't read the quote by Frayling or you completely misunderstood it.
Again, Frayling said (in 1981) that Morricone's non-Leone music has seldom matched his work with Leone.
Now you respond, as some sort of rebuttal to that, by saying that A) Morricone's concerts are packed; and that B) Morricone's most popular hits are his pre-1981 work with Leone.

I'd be really impressed if you can explain how that is in any way, shape, or form,  a rebuttal/response to Frayling's statement.

You either did not read the statement by Frayling or you completely misunderstood it  Roll Eyes





Perhaps if you read the thread from the beginning you will understand. The post where you are quoting me is a response to a few different posts. Specifically, when I mention 1981 I am answering to Dave Jenkins and Groggy's posts from August 15 2011. 

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