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Author Topic: Movie posters you'd LOVE to own. Post them here with picture if possible.  (Read 35073 times)
Richard--W
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« Reply #90 on: November 27, 2011, 01:03:46 PM »






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« Reply #91 on: November 27, 2011, 01:18:51 PM »

Nice collection Richard, How was " You Can't Win Them All" never heard of it before?

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« Reply #92 on: November 27, 2011, 02:45:37 PM »

I've trying to find a copy of You Can't Win 'Em All. It's a British western, perhaps even a spaghetti. I've never seen it. For all I know it may go by another title.

 





 






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"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
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« Reply #93 on: November 27, 2011, 03:37:59 PM »

I didn't discover the collaborations between director Budd Boetticher and Randolph Scott until the 1990s, when their films started to air regularly on TCM and then on the Westerns Channel. The best of them are written by Burt Kennedy. His scripts are terse, lean, and minimalist, with stoic flinty characters, desperate premises, and gutsy, primal themes. The young writer starting out on his career, the director whose career had stalled, and the star whose popularity had declined pushed aggression, ambivalence, and violence further than the westerns had gone before. Kennedy didn't write the three town-based stories that could be shot on a backlot. Of the three, I prefer Buchanan Rides Alone for its Old Tucson Studio location, the most authentic and rugged outdoor street and surrounding park ever devoted to westerns. It's partly a satire, which is not my thing. Decision At Sundown offered Scott one of his most emotional characters, and he rises to the challenge well. Westbound was an average studio assignment delivered to fulfill a contract, but Scott and Boetticher make the most of it. The other four written by Kennedy are lean mean suspense thrillers that play out in the hot dusty desert and high rocks of the Alabama Hills and Lone Pine in eastern California. Here Boetticher gets to hone his minimalist dramatic style and refine his stoicism with classic compositions and pictorial beauty. The scripts averaged 80 pages, which means Boetticher had to shoot 6-7 pages in a day. Hard to believe they achieved such high quality on only $250,000 budgets in 12 shooting days. I could watch The Tall T and Ride Lonesome all day, but my favorites are their first and last collaborations, 7 Men From Now and Comanche Station, both masterpieces of the genre. Although these films were intended to fill the bottom half of a double-feature, the storytelling has not dated and the craftsmanship outclasses the bigger, more expensive and ambitious films they were meant to support. There is no substitute for talent and know-how and sticking with what you know.





















At repertory screenings audiences are so impressed by these intense and visually beautiful westerns that they don't notice the austerity of the productions and the brevity of the length. In fact, austerity and brevity are among the virtues of these great westerns.

It is still possible to make westerns like them.

Richard

« Last Edit: November 28, 2011, 12:03:03 AM by Richard--W » Logged

"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
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« Reply #94 on: November 27, 2011, 05:36:46 PM »

You would think they would be able to make them, I have a feeling that that hands on knowledge and craftsmanship that was handed down during the "Golden Age" just unraveled.  Cry

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« Reply #95 on: November 27, 2011, 07:06:15 PM »

Indeed it has, and everybody in the business notices it.
Bankers and oil companies and information agencies run the studios now, not film and theatrical people.
The people who make decisions have changed, and they politicize, judge and control everything.
Westerns shot on practical budgets have to be done independently, without studio participation.
Studios actively look for independent product to distribute.
They are useful as distributors, but only after the film has been completed.
To involve a studio before the western is shot is asking for trouble.
They don't want to hear about westerns anyhow, at least not until after the work is done, and then they give you their attention with the greatest of reluctance.

But you'd be surprised how many below-the-line people are willing to step outside the studio to be involved with westerns.
The demand for new westerns is greater than the supply right now.


Richard

« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 11:40:05 PM by Richard--W » Logged

"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
Richard--W
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« Reply #96 on: November 27, 2011, 09:02:17 PM »

Luke Short.
The name of a real-life frontier gambler and occasional peace officer whose way with cards and guns gave birth to several biographies and endless legends.
He didn't live long enough to write screenplays, but talented novelist Frederick Dilley Glidden assumed his name to pen some of the most literate and intelligent western novels of the golden age.
Good writing is important to the western, and any film that adapted a Luke Short story started out on the right foot.




 

Due almost entirely to the source, Albuquerque and Coroner Creek are not nearly as dated as most westerns of the period. Ramrod (1947), Blood On the Moon (1948), Ambush (1950), and Ride the Man Down (1952) are among the best westerns of their era, authentic and highly original stories inventively filmed. Silver City and Hell's Outpost I haven't seen, but Vengeance Valley (1951) is an underrated gem. The roles for women are particularly good in a Luke Short story, especially in Ramrod which gave Veronica Lake the juiciest femme fatale of her career. Feminist Hollywood would never permit that kind of character today. Actors and directors love to work with Luke Short interactions and dialogues.



 























The rights to Luke Short's novels were bought a long time ago, but most remain unfilmed.
A pity because they are first-rate stories and very cinematic.

Richard

« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 11:46:11 PM by Richard--W » Logged

"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
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« Reply #97 on: November 28, 2011, 05:03:18 AM »

Just a question Richard, out of curiosity, since we touched on writing & on Boetticher in a few threads have you or anyone you know ever seen Boetticher's original script for "Two Mules For Sister Sara", I've always been curious as to the changes that were made to the original story.

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« Reply #98 on: November 28, 2011, 10:43:20 AM »

That script is available. Or at least one draft of it, credited to Boetticher if memory serves. No I haven't read it but I'll look around and let you know what I find.

Love the kicking-mule & jingle-jangle spur music in Two Mules For Sister Sara.


Richard

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"I am not afraid to die like a man fighting but I would not like to be killed like a dog unarmed."
William H. Bonney to Gov. Lew Wallace, March 1879.
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« Reply #99 on: February 23, 2013, 07:50:05 PM »

If I had to choose one, and only one. It would definitely be this: http://cf2.imgobject.com/t/p/original/m35YsZX7g42aaGBntrBPrjMloZa.jpg

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« Reply #100 on: March 18, 2013, 05:06:56 AM »

I recently stumbled upon this one - http://media.screened.com/uploads/0/562/324304-onceuponatimeinamerica3.jpg

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