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: Django (1966)  ( 68875 )
Banjo
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« #105 : May 01, 2007, 03:54:46 PM »

Hey Banjo have you tried that 4OD (Channel 4 on demand on their website) They claim to have cult films (SW's?) I can't do it because I have the great computer in the world A Mac but anyone with a PC can.
No LA. :-\
I'll be surprised if they have anything other than Django,Django Kill or Great Silence (all shown on Film4)but i'll try and check it out.
Don't have a link do you?

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« #106 : May 01, 2007, 04:00:31 PM »

Here we go http://www.channel4.com/4od/  :)


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« #107 : May 01, 2007, 04:10:36 PM »

Mmmmm  £1.99 per film rental. :-\

I couldn't find out which sw's they have in their catalogue.

I'll have to check it out again when i'm more awake.Its gone midnight.

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« #108 : May 25, 2007, 03:16:32 AM »

Leone Admirer's review from his SW Virgins Guide:-

Django

Now I knew of the reputation that this film had on these forums. It wasn't a very positive one, but going in to watch this film I tried to keep an open mind. When the screen went dark and the DVD reverted to the menu I came away with a feeling that I actually did enjoy this film. Not incredibly so but as a piece of entertainment, it was an enjoyable film.
       Django (Franco Nero) walks onto the screen dragging a coffin. He see's a bunch of mexicans trying to whip a woman. Before he has time to react men covered in red balaclavas shoot the mexicans and come down to punish the woman themselves. However this time, Django intervenes and kills the red hooded men. He enters a town with the woman and sets up camp at the saloon. He find's the town is nearly empty and if informed that this is because there are two gangs fighting over the territory. One under the control of Major Jackson and his red scarves and the other led by a mexican bandit who can't return home. As the film carries on and Django gets into more and more scrapes between the two groups, we learn that Django has an ulterior motive concerning the major which involves the death of a loved one.
     The film is different in its portrayal of the West then the previous Spaghetti's I have seen in my non-Leone series of films. The town is shown in the height of winter, its muddy, dirty, empty and wet. The film has a low budget, ewhich I think is used to quite an effect in the mood of the ghost town but does lend itself to quite a few continuity errors. This could be seen when Django fires a tripod mounted machine gun and the bullets either side of the loading bay don't move, and in one close up, it seems the gun flares are being created by flash bulbs. There are other faults with the film as well. A camerman can be very distinctly seen during a bar fight. Also the red hoods of the Colonels Men are not very effective at all. Again, according to the accompanying featurette this was done because the background artists were not 'handsome' enough to be his men so they had to be covered up. It seems to me they have taken the idea of the cowboy's, who during the era of Wyatt Earp and Tombstone (shown in, what is my opinion a darn good western called Tombstone) used to wear a small red sash to show they were apart of the cowboy group. However in Django the bright red doesn't really work and does seem very out of place with the mood of the film.
      The characters and acting in the film are also very interesting. Django is a very enigmatic figure, especially with the rather bleak image of him carrying the mud and slime encrusted coffin. For those who haven't seen the film I wont disapoint them by telling whats in the coffin, but for those who have seen it, would (hopefully) agree that the idea of what was in the coffin could perhaps have been made more upon to give it perhaps a more meaningful presentation of Django's life at that moment.  Nero's portrayal of him as a very tortured man is actually quite touching and the very severe beatings that he gets does leave you with sympathy for him.
    Colonel Jackson (Eduardo Fajardo) is an interesting antagonist. Throughout quite a bit of the movie he does seem to be very scared of Django and therefore looses a bit of his threatning air that we would often associate with Spaghetti villains. The mexican bandit leader however does have some humour to his person, but is actually also the most violent. This leaves the viewer with the feeling that both groups are as bad as the other and Django's seemingly one man war against them isn't that bad.
    The girl that Django rescues at the begining of the film does seem to be a bit sidelined and perhaps lost a bit in the action but she does serve as one of the major points in the story.
     Corbucci's direction is efficent. He seems to be working well with the means that he was given but mistakes definatly occur (another is a car can be very distinctly seen in the graveyard.) He handles the scnes of brutal violence quite well, with the ear cutting off sequence (definatly an influence on Tarantino) and the severe beating of Django definatly still shocking, even if the makeup does seem a little off. The cinemematography is quite interesting with some arresting composistions and the camera often doing some interesting movement. Dubbing is often of a sub-standard condition, but the sound design and the music all help to make this an entertaining film.
      Blue Underground bring us "Sergio Corbucci's immortal classic - now restored from the original negative!" At the bottom of the blurb at the back of the DVD they cite the fact that "This definitive edition of DJANGO has been re-mastered from the original camera negative, recently discovered in a Rome vault untouched for over three decades. Also included for the first time is the optional Italian audio track featuring Franco Nero's own voice. Following two years of extensive restoration, Blue Underground is now proud to present the most stunning version of DJANGO you will ever see." The restoration of the film is very good. The video is sharp, preserving the muted colors of the original transfer and is presented uncut. There is some damage but Blue Underground helpfully put a notice at the front of the film actually apologising for some of the damage that couldn't be removed during the restoration.
      The audio is also very good with no hiss and clicks. It does highlight the poor dubbing of the English track but I also listened to the Italian language track which was much richer.
            The film comes with the featurette Django: The One and Only. This is made up with interviews with the star Franco Nero and the AD, Ruggero Deodato, and they freely discuss their opinions of the film and the director. I found this a very intersting doco, which I watched after the move as a title card appears before you being to watch it, advising that due to the fact that it contains spoilers, it is recomended not to be viewed before the movie. Also included is a theatrical trailer, an interesting photo and still gallery as well as some Talent bios.
          Also included of the DVD is the short The Last Pistolero starring Franco Nero. It is a film of style over substance. Beautfully shot in black and white, it looks sumptious but I hated the electronic rubbish they added to Morricone's score from FOD. The film was very cold and to be honest I didn't really like it with my only admiration being the look of the film.
         Django was an interesting film. Whilst I no way think its "Immortal classic" or a "Landmark classic" I do think it is an entertaining film in its own right which is let down by its very low budget. I think those who have seen it certainly have their own opinions on it, and for those who haven't seen it, I do recomend a viewing so you have seen one of the supposed "Must See" Spaghetti's.

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« #109 : May 25, 2007, 01:39:38 PM »

Oh god you dug that one up  :-[  O0


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« #110 : May 25, 2007, 04:11:10 PM »

Have you changed your opinion in any way since writing that  LA? :-\

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« #111 : May 25, 2007, 04:32:31 PM »

Not really I just think that it's not one of my most articulated reviews.


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« #112 : May 26, 2007, 12:03:46 PM »

Arizona Colts review:-

DJANGO- 1966-Massive hit in Europe, this film showcased a different kind of hero. One that was conniving and deceptive and not above being mutilated in some way. Django is a coffin toting mystery man who is after a nasty, racist named Major Jackson played with appropriate villainy by Eduardo Fajardo. In between his vendetta, Django helps a Mexican bandit gang rob a fort of its gold consignment. Before the gang can double cross him, Django attempts to do the same to them leading to a cruel scene where the gang renders Django nearly incapable of handling a gun shortly before he is to meet up with his nemesis, Major Jackson. When submitted to the BBFC, the level of violence made the film unreleasable. It also failed to snag US distribution. In Europe however, the film got some 50 sequels most in name only, others detailing Django’s adventures played by different actors each interpreting the character differently. The film made big stars out of Franco Nero and director Sergio Corbucci who was able to secure 1 million budgets for his films after DJANGO’s success. Several others behind the scenes would go on to fruitful careers as well. Assistant director Ruggero Deodato and cinematographer Enzo Barboni would both go on to hugely successful directorial careers. Luis Bacalov contributes a great score. A landmark in western cinema.

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« #113 : July 12, 2007, 01:22:08 PM »

Finally seen it.  O0 O0 O0
Very good, very naturalistic, very hard!
 ;)
That coffin rules!


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« #114 : July 12, 2007, 01:51:00 PM »

Finally seen it.  O0 O0 O0
Very good, very naturalistic, very hard!
 ;)
That coffin rules!

I agree. The film is bloody genius! Corbucci can direct I tell you that much.




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« #115 : July 12, 2007, 03:03:12 PM »

This was the first non-Leone spaghetti western I ever saw.


To this day it is still my favorite.

I didn't get into the internet until about a year after I saw this flick. When I went on spag chat forums I was expecting this to be well talked about and recieved but to my horror it was panned by many.
I can't understand why? It has all the ingredients one can need to make a spaghetti western.
Sure the second act is a bit slow paced and the whole mexican revolution stuff isn't very interesting but the first half hour and the final 15 minutes just ooze class.
I believe Django has the best ending cinema has ever seen




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« #116 : July 12, 2007, 03:12:29 PM »

This was the first non-Leone spaghetti western I ever saw.


To this day it is still my favorite.

I didn't get into the internet until about a year after I saw this flick. When I went on spag chat forums I was expecting this to be well talked about and recieved but to my horror it was panned by many.
I can't understand why? It has all the ingredients one can need to make a spaghetti western.
Sure the second act is a bit slow paced and the whole mexican revolution stuff isn't very interesting but the first half hour and the final 15 minutes just ooze class.
I believe Django has the best ending cinema has ever seen

The best ending cinema has ever seen? mmmm that may be stretching it just a bit don't you think Firecracker? I can think of a handful of spaghetti western's alone that have a better ending with mostly Leone's films passing it. It's not even Corbucci's best ending. That goes to "The Great Silence" in my opinion.




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« #117 : July 30, 2007, 11:57:43 AM »

Well, I wouldn't call the ending that way either, but I really liked it, too...



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« #118 : November 15, 2007, 08:05:58 PM »

I posted this in the Rate the Last Movie You Saw thread, but think it's more likely to have discussion here. I'll expand on this comment if I get any replies:

I honestly wasn't expecting to like this one, based on what I'd heard about it, but surprisingly I found this to be, if not the best, then certainly the most entertaining of the non-Leone Spaghettis I've seen this far. The characters were cool and there was a lot of neat use of color and scenery. There were only three problems: the title song (the instrumental music was good though), the dubbing (which was my fault - did anyone else think Django sounded like a bad Charlton Heston impersonator?), and Django's motivation - as in, what is it? I know it's kinda-sorta-not-really revealed but it's only mentioned in passing and is obviously incidental to what goes on during the film. Oh well, it was pretty good for what it is. 7/10



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« #119 : November 16, 2007, 01:35:01 AM »

I love the title song. Though, I must admit, it doesn't fit into the film properly. But the instrumental versions throughout the film are really great and fit perfectly to the mood. As to the dubbing - my version is Italian, so I don't have this problem. ;D I like the Italian sound.
And I agree with you, it's very entertaining. I haven't seen many SW's yet, but still I think it will be hard for them to surpass this in this aspect. It has many gaps in the plot and so on, but it's really entertaining and tense (especially in the end).



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