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Author Topic: 3:10 to Yuma (2007)  (Read 129111 times)
Dust Devil
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« Reply #465 on: June 02, 2009, 01:26:08 PM »

Depending on the mood I'm in I'd give it a 6 - 6.5 /10, not more. It has a few good moments but overall doesn't deliver (and I'm not talking about technicalities, inaccuracies etc.). Certainly could have been better. Too bad.

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« Reply #466 on: June 03, 2009, 06:17:25 AM »

Depending on the mood I'm in I'd give it a 6 - 6.5 /10, not more. It has a few good moments but overall doesn't deliver (and I'm not talking about technicalities, inaccuracies etc.). Certainly could have been better. Too bad.

I think that the difference between a 5 and a 6\10 should depend on whether one plans to ever rewatch it or not. You probably plan to give it another try. I don't.

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« Reply #467 on: June 03, 2009, 08:57:52 AM »

Watched it two times so far but yeah, I was kinda thinking of giving it another try one day... Well, I'll see, but doubt it'll be any time soon.

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« Reply #468 on: May 10, 2011, 09:21:48 AM »

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Aside from a brief spurt of interest in the mid-'90s, Westerns haven't been box-office gold for four decades. The past five years have seen a number of ambitious oaters (Appaloosa, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford), but few did any business until the Coens' True Grit remake proved a surprise hit last winter. With Disney said to be reviving The Lone Ranger and Quentin Tarantino lined up for a neo-Spaghetti, it's possible Westerns will come back, but I'm skeptical.

3:10 to Yuma (2007) is one of the more ambitious stabs at reviving the genre. With a prestige director - James Mangold, fresh off the much-garlanded Walk the Line (2005) - two super-stars and a $55 million budget, jampacked with action and mayhem, 3:10 is clearly geared towards a mass audience. But this remake of a venerable '50s cult classic sacrifices the original's focused intensity for expansive silliness, resulting in an uneven, unsatisfying film.

Rancher Dan Evans (Christian Bale) loses his barn to landowner Hollander's (Lennie Loftin) thugs, and has a week to raise $200. His wife (Gretchen Mol) questions Dan's judgment, and oldest son William (Logan Lerman) thinks he's a wimp. Dan and his sons witness a stagecoach robbery, and Dan helps apprehend gang leader Ben Wade (Russell Crowe), a legendary outlaw. Dan joins a posse, organized by railroad agent Butterfield (Dallas Roberts), to transport Ben to Contention, where he'll catch the titular train to Yuma prison. Surviving Indian ambush, a run-in with crooked miners and Ben's own trickery and temptation, Dan and the gang arrive in Contention, only to find Ben's psychotic sidekick Charlie Prince (Ben Foster) waiting.

The strongest memory I had of 3:10 to Yuma, before today's rewatch, was being waylaid twice by vagrants while going to see it in theaters, on two consecutive days. Because of this, I didn't actually see the film until it was safely on DVD in July 2008. That might explain the film's middling box-office returns: the target audience was too busy tangling with rapacious hobos.

Personal experience aside, 3:10 is definitely a film for 21st Century viewers looking for action, thrills and stars. It's hardly the first contemporary Western to target this demographic, and it's certainly less obnoxious than Young Guns or American Outlaws. It's also nice to see a Western starring actors a few decades younger than, say, Ed Harris or Robert Duvall. But many Western fans will reject its modern trappings, and even lay viewers might take issue with its problematic screenplay.

Mangold marshals an impressive production. The script remains close to the original's basic story, but expands the journey to Contention to allow for more action scenes and character development. The action often borders on the ridiculous, but the big set-pieces are well-staged, exciting and intense. Fans of the original might be disappointed that the suspenseful finale is replaced by a huge-scale running gunfight, but it's enjoyable enough on its own frenetic terms. Phedon Papamichael's striking photography and Greg Berry's rustic art direction provide a lot of nice pictures. Aside from Marco Beltrami's muzak Morricone score, the production yields little to complain about.

However, all the action and pretty scenery come at the expense of pacing and plot logic. Ben's escort must be the most incompetent posse in Western history: they let Ben get away with killing posse mates, twice, without any punishment but a few raps to the head. After a criminal kills two deputies and temporarily escapes a third time isn't it time to string him up from the nearest tree? At 122 minutes, 3:10 still feels about twenty minutes too long: Mangold wastes time on needless digressions (a shootout with renegade Apaches, Ben's trip to a mining camp) and a large but colorless supporting cast. Then there's the finale, with the original's already suspect twist mutating into absurdity.

3:10 further stumbles by trying to make its protagonists needlessly complex. The original's simple but effective battle of wills turns into a trite psychodrama. Dan spells out his motives in bright neon lights, every grunt and twitch explained by some traumatic past incident. His family conflicts are trite and cheesy, and Dan becomes unbearably pathetic. Meanwhile, Ben sketches his conjugal conquests, tempts Dan's son William and muses over his lost parents. This backstory is contrived and unaffecting; curiously, the more Mangold and writers Michael Brandt and Derek Haas probe Ben and Dan's motivations, the less credible and interesting they become.

Russell Crowe gives a striking performance, nearly besting Glenn Ford in the original. Crowe dominates the film, giving Ben lots of superficial charm to conceal his snake-like nastiness. Christian Bale is intense but one-note, more pitiable than sympathetic. (And pray tell, how can a guy with one foot run and leap across rooftops so easily?) Ben Foster's psychotic second banana makes a striking villain, and Peter Fonda gets a nice supporting role as a grizzled Pinkerton agent. Gretchen Mol (The Shape of Things) is wasted in a tiny role, and the rest of the cast doesn't register at all.

3:10 to Yuma is a respectable attempt at bringing the Western to a modern audience. More jaded viewers will find much to criticize, however, and most Western fans should probably stick with the original. 6/10

[urlhttp://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2011/05/310-to-yuma-2007.html][/url]

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« Reply #469 on: March 01, 2016, 12:11:42 PM »

While I didn't read through the entire thread (though maybe I should have), I basically agree with the logic flaws that people like DJ, CJ, et al mentioned. It's an entertaining movie, has a nice pace and Crowe was pretty damn good (though I agree he should have been the rancher), but it's plagued by pedestrian visuals and is ultimately a forgettable experience. I saw the movie last week and almost forgot that I even watched it.

The score was solid but underused and not properly utilized, and there were way too many plain-jane medium close ups and the bland art direction didn't help either. Even though the original may have some logic issues with the plot, I consider it a masterpiece and it's the furthest thing from forgettable. This one is entertaining, and held my attention despite some stupidity (ie lazy writing), but it's one of those movies where I doubt I'll even remember anything about it six months from now.

For now it gets a generous 7 because I liked Crowe, Fonda and the brisk pace, but six months from now (or whenever I forget almost everything about this movie) it's probably a 6/10.

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« Reply #470 on: February 08, 2017, 08:25:34 PM »

When you think about it, which I have been lately, is they weren't paying me to walk away. They were paying me so they could walk away.

3:10 to Yuma is directed by James Mangold and co-adapted to screenplay by Halsted Welles, Michael Brandt and Derek Haas. A remake of Delmer Daves' 1957 film of the same name, it's based on a story written by Elmore Leonard. It stars Russell Crowe, Christian Bale, Peter Fonda, Ben Foster and Logan Lerman. Music is by Marco Beltrami and cinematography by Phedon Papamichael.

After the capture of notorious outlaw Ben Wade (Crowe), a posse is put together to escort him to the town of Contention from where he will be put on the 3:10 train to Yuma prison. Joining this posse is broke rancher Dan Evans (Bale), disabled in the Civil War, Dan is struggling to keep hold of his land and to support his family. Seen as a flop in the eyes of his eldest son William (Lerman), Dan sees this opportunity as a way out of his problems. But with Wade an intelligent foe, and the outlaw boss' gang on their trail, Evans and the posse will do well to make it to Contention alive…..

Daves' original film is a fine effort, very much pulsing with psychological beats and cloaked in claustrophobic atmospherics. Backed up by two excellent Western performers in Glenn Ford and Van Heflin, there is many a Western fan who cherish it and never felt it was a genre piece ripe for a remake; myself included. But the logic behind the reasons Mangold and his team put forward for remaking it made sense. A story of great thematics for the adults, and action a go-go for the younger modern film fan. Thus putting a Western back in the headlines at yet another time when the genre was gasping for air. All that was left to do was get two of the modern era's biggest stars to play Wade and Evans-which of course they duly did-and it was good to go. Just don't mess it up was all that was asked of the makers.

Running at nearly half an hour longer than the original, Mangold's movie slots in a new mid-section and changes the ending. The former works a treat as the posse venture through hostile Apache country, meet some ne'er-do-well railroad ruffians, while Wade's gang, led by the supremely fiendish Charlie Prince (Foster), are on the bloody trail. The latter is a huge misstep, both in execution and character development. Most film fans are happy to suspend disbelief in the name of good entertainment, but here we are asked to ignore some impossible athletics while also being asked to swallow a character turn around that beggars belief. Such a shame because up till then the blend of traditional Western character themes such as morality and redemption, had dovetailed nicely with the pistol banging and all round breezy action construction. While the father and son axis gives the narrative some extra bite.

Even bad guys love their mothers.

The performances are also of a high standard. In the support slots Fonda, Foster and Lerman are top dollar. Fonda is all leather faced and gruff as bounty hunter McElroy, Foster does a quality line in sneering villainy, and Lerman, in a tricky role, utterly convinces as the conflicted boy breaking out into a man. But this is Crowe and Bale's movie. Crowe has Wade as an intelligent dandy, a man who loves and understands women, an artist who also has a tongue as quick as his hands are on his guns. We know that Wade is callous, but Crowe ensures that we never know what is around the corner or truly on his mind. Bale puts much dignity into Evans, he's a put upon man, tortured by his failings on the home front, but there is stoic nobility there and as he and Wade venture further on their journey, a grudging respect begins to form and Bale and Crowe really start to put credibility into their characters. And then that last quarter nearly undoes all their excellent work….

In spite of this, 3:10 to Yuma is a good time to be had as a modern Western production with old traditional values. Energetic and never dull from first frame to last, it's recommended on proviso you don't mind unscrewing your head and taking out your brain for the last 15 minutes. 7.5/10

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« Reply #471 on: February 28, 2017, 10:42:06 PM »

Ok. Just saw this for the first time.  It was actually pretty good.  For people who didn't like it because of it being a remake, it came off better than the Magnificent 7 remake which HUGELY dissappointed me.  This movie felt like a western, and not a big fake hollywood blockbuster like the new MAG7 did.  Here is my quick review:

1. Cinematography.  Interestingly, this may have been the film's weakest point.  The camera work by Phedon Papamichael was ok, but there was nothing special about the scenery or the set pieces.

2. Script: This was hit and miss with me.

The Good. I love the fact that the new screenplay veered off into a couple of new directions. Spoiler Alerts: The ending in particular surprised me.  I like the way the writers added more to the main story.  The fight with the Indians.  The opening scene with the Gatlin gun.  The confrontation at the mining camp.  The aggressiveness of Wade was pretty good.

The Bad.  I have mixed feelings about the son being heavily involved.  It didn't play bad, it was just a huge extra element.  Another thing that i didn't like.  Wade's character was soo aggressive and violent, that you never had a sense that he was REALLY not in charge and could escape anytime he wanted to. This especially affected the hotel room scene in which Evans character was supposedly calling the shots while waiting on the train.  Wade had run roughshod over everything in sight, but suddenly, was helpless in the Hotel room.  The writers atoned for this during the final chase scene by having Wade take control of Evans.

3.  The Acting. Crowe's character was very good. Bale was ok. Foster was very good.  Everybody else was solid.

4. Musical Score. Solid. It was different for a western and i liked it.

Overall. I was pleasantly surprised by this. I didn't know what to expect with Crowe playing a bad guy.  Again, unlike the new MAG7, it was a hollywood blockbuster, that didn't play like a hollywood blockbuster, which was a good thing.  Is it better than the original? Thats very subjective.  Some will say yes, some will say no.  Thats also a good thing.  Its a great movie to add to your Blu Ray collection.  I rate this a solid 7 out of 10...

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« Reply #472 on: March 01, 2017, 02:49:28 AM »



Overall. I was pleasantly surprised by this. I didn't know what to expect with Crowe playing a bad guy.  Again, unlike the new MAG7, it was a hollywood blockbuster, that didn't play like a hollywood blockbuster, which was a good thing.  Is it better than the original? Thats very subjective.  Some will say yes, some will say no.  Thats also a good thing.

Really?
Some will say that this is a total disaster (despite a wonderful Russell Crowe), and a pretty idiotic film. And it got worse in a 2nd viewing. 2/10

Delmer Daves' original on the other hand is one of the best westerns of the 50s. 9/10

Mag 7 isn't good either, but at least watchable and enjoyable on a minor level. 5/10

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« Reply #473 on: March 01, 2017, 05:31:02 AM »

Really?
Some will say that this is a total disaster (despite a wonderful Russell Crowe), and a pretty idiotic film. And it got worse in a 2nd viewing. 2/10

Delmer Daves' original on the other hand is one of the best westerns of the 50s. 9/10

Mag 7 isn't good either, but at least watchable and enjoyable on a minor level. 5/10

I saw this right after watching the Missouri Breaks.  That must be why this looks like a masterpiece in comparison....lol   It DOES have some flaws...

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« Reply #474 on: March 01, 2017, 05:36:40 AM »

I saw this right after watching the Missouri Breaks.  That must be why this looks like a masterpiece in comparison....lol   It DOES have some flaws...

The Missouri Breaks is much better for me, despite some flaws, but another league compared to the 3:10 remake.

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« Reply #475 on: March 01, 2017, 02:07:18 PM »

Some will say that this is a total disaster (despite a wonderful Russell Crowe), and a pretty idiotic film. And it got worse in a 2nd viewing. 2/10
Sometimes stanton is so right it's scary.

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« Reply #476 on: March 02, 2017, 02:48:19 AM »

I bet I'd give this a 4/10 now. Anybody wanna bet?

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« Reply #477 on: March 02, 2017, 05:15:18 AM »

I bet I'd give this a 4/10 now. Anybody wanna bet?

Not really, but a 4 is mighty generous ... Wink

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« Reply #478 on: March 02, 2017, 05:17:48 AM »

He's gonna rate it 4 anyway. They have never seen a western movie before in Eastern Europe.

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« Reply #479 on: March 02, 2017, 10:00:33 AM »

I've had neighbours who were in Winnetou movies, at least I saw their pictures from the shooting locations.

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