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Author Topic: The Lineup (1958)  (Read 5190 times)
cigar joe
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« on: November 14, 2007, 05:24:46 AM »

Last night TCM had a guest programmer with Robert Osborn, James Ellroy, and what a great bunch of obscure and hard to find Noirs that they presented. It started at 8PM but I didn't turn to it until 9:30 for the beginning of a Vic Morrow hit man film, but the topper was the next film.

Dir. Don Siegal, starring  Eli Wallach as mob hitman Dancer ,  Robert Keith (Brian Keith's father) as  Julian (his mentor) and  Richard Jaeckel as the driver. What a great little Noir gem, Eli Wallach's second film and he was great as a cold blooded hit man. Its got some great action sequences around San Francisco with even a car chase that will remind you of Bullet.

The story is about heroin shipments that are carried back by unsuspecting tourists stuffed in their souvenirs, a couple of mob guys (Wallach & Kieth) go around and collect the souvenirs any way they can.

And there is one gem of a sequence that will remind you of Widmark's Tommy Udo in "Kiss of Death". very cool!

« Last Edit: November 14, 2007, 08:53:27 AM by cigar joe » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2007, 08:35:22 AM »

Oh I love that film! I saw it first as a child and had that image of a suspensful scene on a bridge of a motorway in my head for years. It was hard to get that film in the 80's / 90's. I finally taped it 5 years ago. It holds up pretty good (although the experience from 1977 can't be dublicated - shame).

Yeah, cool film. As most of Don Siegel's films.

With 'Feathers' on the set of THE KILLERS:

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« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2007, 11:26:16 AM »

  I caught it last night on TCM too and really liked it, wrote a mini-review in the "Rate the last movie..." post.  For a movie from 1958, it just seemed so ahead of its time, pretty risque subjects and the violence was kinda startling too.  My favorite though was Dancer always telling Julian what the victim's last words were.  I haven't seen anything like that in a movie in a long time. 

  Great cast too, especially Wallach and Keith, but I thought Jaekel as the wheelman and Anderson as Lt. Guthrie were good in supporting roles.  Let's hope for a DVD! Smiley

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« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2007, 01:02:39 PM »

I wish I would have seen the TCM scheduel earlier they had a great lineup (pun). Afro

As it was though I hit the record button at Murder by Contract got that & the next two for sure, here is most of it.

Stakeout on Dope Street (1958) 
Three teens get into the drug business when they discover heroin in a stolen briefcase.
Cast: Yale Wexler, Jonathan Haze, Abby Dalton. Dir: Irvin Kershner. BW-83 mins, TV-PG 
   
9:30pm  Murder by Contract (1958) 
A ruthless contract killer balks when he discovers his next hit is a woman.
Cast: Vince Edwards, Phillip Pine, Herschel Bernardi. Dir: Irving Lerner. BW-80 mins, TV-PG
     
11:00pm  Lineup, The (1958) 
A pair of hit men track down a heroin shipment while the police get closer.
Cast: Eli Wallach, Robert Keith, Warner Anderson. Dir: Don Siegel. BW-87 mins, TV-14     
12:30am 

Armored Car Robbery (1950) 
A police officer tries to find half a million dollars stolen by gangsters.
Cast: Charles McGraw, Adele Jergens, William Talman. Dir: Richard Fleischer BW-68 mins, TV-PG     
1:45am 

Follow Me Quietly (1949)   
Police track a mysterious killer nicknamed "The Judge."
Cast: William Lundigan, Dorothy Patrick, Jeff Corey. Dir: Richard Fleischer. BW-59 mins, TV-14     
2:45am 

Kiss Me Deadly (1955)
Detective Mike Hammer fights to solve the murder of a beautiful hitchhiker with a mysterious connection to the Mob.
Cast: Ralph Meeker, Cloris Leachman, Albert Dekker. Dir: Robert Aldrich. BW-106 mins, TV-PG     
4:45am 

« Last Edit: November 14, 2007, 01:07:36 PM by cigar joe » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2007, 04:25:40 PM »

Quote
Follow Me Quietly (1949)   
Police track a mysterious killer nicknamed "The Judge."
Cast: William Lundigan, Dorothy Patrick, Jeff Corey. Dir: Richard Fleischer. BW-59 mins, TV-14     
2:45am 
As it happens, my copy of this on a French DVD just arrived. I'll make a point of watching it soon.

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« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2007, 12:24:33 PM »

I caught this other night and also enjoyed it very much.  Wallach was very good as the psychopath hitman Dancer.  Keith turned in a nice performance as his hands off mentor who records the last words of Dancer's victims.  Interesting touch.  That reminded me of another film but I couldn't make the association.  I was thinking another hitman film but maybe I was thinking of the Cooper film They Came To Cordura that was on recently where he was asking questions and making notes in his notebook.  Not sure.  It was also a kick to see a young Richard Jaeckel as the wheel man.  It was mentioned that this film isn't available on home video.  Can't understand that one.  Don Siegel and Eli Wallach.

I also was able to catch Armored Car Robbery.  I enjoyed watching that one as well.  William Talman of Perry Mason fame as the villainous heist mastermind was very good.  As was Charles McGraw as the hard nosed cop determined to take him down.

Very interesting film picks by James Ellroy.  It was interesting to watch the interview segments between films.  His mother was murdered in 1958 Los Angeles.  I don't believe the case was ever solved.  He mentioned that a lot of his film picks, which were crime, noirish selections bring him back to that period in history....as does his writing.  When Osborne asked him about his writing...he said that he writes everything in long hand and also that he has seven more novels left to write.  He has it all planned out and mentioned that each book would probably require three years.  Also that he had no interest whatsoever writing outside the crime genre. 

The guest programmer schedule on TCM for November has been good last four days or so.  Danny Devito was on Friday night.  I would of liked to re-watch some of his films (Battle Of Algiers, Bridge On River Kwai, Devil Doll, Shampoo) but only caught parts and parts of his interviews.  On Sunday they had Alton Brown, from Food Network and Iron Chef, he picked What's Up Tiger Lilly, Closely Watching Trains, Point Blank and Blow Up all from the sixties.  He was interesting to listen to as well.

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« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2007, 12:28:24 PM »

Quote
The guest programmer schedule on TCM for November has been good last four days or so.  Danny Devito was on Friday night.  I would of liked to re-watch some of his films (Battle Of Algiers, Bridge On River Kwai, Devil Doll, Shampoo) but only caught parts and parts of his interviews.  On Sunday they had Alton Brown, from Food Network and Iron Chef, he picked What's Up Tiger Lilly, Closely Watching Trains, Point Blank and Blow Up all from the sixties.  He was interesting to listen to as well.

  I've really been enjoying TCM's guest programmers these last two weeks.  Alfred Molina had some good picks, The Secret of Santa Vittoria and Get Carter, Rose McGowan looking hot Afro had a few strong ones, and I missed Devito's picks but I wanted to see Algiers.  Hopefully, TCM does this again in the future, it's a good idea.

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« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2007, 12:37:10 PM »

You're right.  I caught part of Alfred Molina on that night.  I think it was on the weekend also.  I did get to see most of
Get Carter.  Molina was a good program host as well.  I enjoyed listening to him.  I missed Rose McGowan.  Sad

On the TCM website they have a nice presentation of all the guest hosts.  I'm sure many have seen it.  If anyone hasn't ....here's the link.  You can click on the particular day and see each person's selections.  Also there's a link to click on and see one of the interview segments for a particular host.  If you missed that night can see a little bit of what they had to say. Or a little bit of what the upcoming hosts talk about.

http://www.tcm.com/index.jsp

 

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« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2007, 05:45:04 PM »

Hey, thanks, that website is actually kinda interesting. Gets me thinking about what kind of program I would choose in such circumstances. Seems like most of these people don't really put enough thought into it. Just choosing your 4 faves isn't the way to go; you should pick good films that aren't out on DVD and/or are infrequently screened. I liked Thelma Schoonmaker's approach: naturally she favored the films of Michael Powell (she was, after all, married to the guy), but she made a point of including the hard-to-see Age of Consent. She actually does a service to the viewer that way.

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« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2007, 07:09:30 PM »

Hey, thanks, that website is actually kinda interesting. Gets me thinking about what kind of program I would choose in such circumstances. Seems like most of these people don't really put enough thought into it. Just choosing your 4 faves isn't the way to go; you should pick good films that aren't out on DVD and/or are infrequently screened. I liked Thelma Schoonmaker's approach: naturally she favored the films of Michael Powell (she was, after all, married to the guy), but she made a point of including the hard-to-see Age of Consent. She actually does a service to the viewer that way.

yw Dave.  I thought it was really well done.  I didn't notice the video interview part at first.  Can also click on the individual films and see a little clip as well.  Funny, I had same thoughts as you.  I couldn't decide what I would choose.  I think you're definitely right it would be best to choose obscure or little known favorites, or maybe pick some kind of theme.  I think everyone if asked their favorites, there would be a lot of Casablancas and  iconic films like that. 

Not a big fan of Donald Trump, but I really did laugh to see that he picked The African Queen, Gone With The Wind and Citizen Kane.  No way do I dispute the quality of the films, but it wasn't very creative.  I think that was the reason why Ellroy's picks were so interesting.  They were obscure and he took the time to explain how some of the films were ahead of their time and had appeal for him.  I don't believe they were his absolute favorites.  They were interesting obscure films within the crime noir genre that he loves.  I did notice Thelma Schoonmaker's list as well.  I think she does approach it in same way.  I think she's going to be quite interesting to listen to.

It would be an interesting idea to start a thread along these lines.  If you were a guest programmer what four films would you choose?  Or if you were appointed by your town or city to put together a film series for the local theater, what kind of festival would you put together?  Or if you had a home video night with friends and were designated to choose four titles to show and share, what would you choose?  Would hope people would stay away from some of the usual suspects, or a night of I,II,III, IV sequels.   The possibilities could be endless.  Could pick films based upon theme, soundtrack or cinematography, period, location and on and on.

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« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2007, 01:13:40 PM »

You've got some good ideas there, Noodles. If I were programming (either for TV or a video night with friends), my first inclination would be to show obscure films that nonetheless have artistic merit, stuff that has been overlooked or is unavailable on DVD. There's a lot of Nicholas Ray, for example, that is under-represented on home video, and films like A Woman's Secret and Born to Be Bad and Bigger Than Life deserve a wider audience. I like the idea of grouping films by composers, although the obvious candidates are in fact already well-represented on DVD (A Bernard Herrmann night would probably consist of Citizen Kane, Hangover Square, Vertigo, and Taxi Driver: all currently available). Hmmm, maybe a Roy Budd night would work well . . .

One thing I'm unsure about: are the programmers on Turner constrained by titles Turner actually owns? Do they show things on Turner that aren't in their archives? In our imaginary programming we would not have to be so constrained, but I'm just wondering if the choices the programmers have made were limited, or if they really could pick just anything they wanted. Anybody know?

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« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2007, 05:16:06 PM »

One thing I'm unsure about: are the programmers on Turner constrained by titles Turner actually owns? Do they show things on Turner that aren't in their archives? In our imaginary programming we would not have to be so constrained, but I'm just wondering if the choices the programmers have made were limited, or if they really could pick just anything they wanted. Anybody know?

I was wondering about that myself.  A couple of times I noticed Robert Osborne introduced a film and said for the first time on TCM....
So I was thinking maybe there were some conditions where they could acquire some selections.  Then I thought afterward, there had to be some restrictions of what they were able to broadcast.  I got to thinking about that article on Alan Ladd Jr and the film broadcast rights and royalties.  Turns out your suspicion is right.  Each of the guest programmers had to look through the TCM library and make their selections from there.  Some of the films in the TCM library had never been broadcast and were premieres.  Their library is extensive enough that they have quite a few obscure films that are also not available on home video.  I guess some programmers also picked the same film.  They tried not to broadcast the same film any more than twice.  I noticed that The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming was a film that was selected twice.  Apparently A Place In The Sun was chosen three times and a programmer ended up choosing an alternate.  The programmers were also instructed to either pick their favorites or pick little known underappreciated films that you'd want to share with someone. Here's an article by Osborne on the the selection process.

http://www.tcm.com/thismonth/article/?cid=185308&mainArticleId=185307

When I was looking that up, I noticed Osborne had some biographical information.
http://www.tcm.com/thismonth/article/?cid=488&mainArticleId=185307

He's originally from the state of Washington, Colfax.  It says he's an investor in two film theaters, The Rose and The Rosebud.  Looks like they're in Port Townsend area.  Maybe you already knew.  Thought you'd find it interesting.
http://www.rosetheatre.com/about/history.html
   


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« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2007, 11:07:22 PM »

Thanks, all interesting stuff. I didn't know any of it before.

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