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Author Topic: The Leopard aka Il gattopardo (1963)  (Read 19883 times)
Poggle
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« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2005, 07:53:16 PM »

After reading about how the interior of Morton's train, the interior of the wagon on the beginning of DYS and Max's office at the end of OUAIIA all look like they could be inspired by The Leopard, I started thinking - The Leopard is about an aristocrat falling from power, and Morton, the rich aristocrats on the beginning of DYS and Max eventually fall from their power and authority in the movies.

Maybe Leone letting Visconti's artistic world co-exist with his?

I guess if anyone doesn't want to be ousted from their positions they better not get any interior decorating ideas from these movies Tongue

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Blueberry
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« Reply #16 on: August 19, 2005, 03:12:15 AM »

On the Big Screen!!

Re-premiere today in 2 Danish cinemas... all the major newspapers agree in their reviews today: ****** - masterpice. Can't wait. I'll see it while waiting for the second part of 1900, which is also re-showing on the big screen at the time.  Cheesy

Who the hell wanna go watch "The Island" or "The Fantastic 4" then?

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titoli
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« Reply #17 on: August 19, 2005, 04:10:39 AM »

Do the danish big screens work with classics (though the leopard and 900 are not my favourites) only in summer or throughout the year? And only in bigger cities or also in small towns? These re-releases are distributed nationally or left to theatre-owners' choice?



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« Reply #18 on: August 22, 2005, 07:25:25 AM »

Only 2-4 cinemas in th entire country, 3 of which are in Copenhagen.

The time of year's got nothing to do with it - when they are available.

Up to the theatre-owners - no commercial cinema would do it.

These others are supported by the tax payers - a kind of public service so that we are ensured art films or small European productions once in a while.

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« Reply #19 on: August 22, 2005, 09:56:01 AM »

After reading about how the interior of Morton's train, the interior of the wagon on the beginning of DYS and Max's office at the end of OUAIIA all look like they could be inspired by The Leopard, I started thinking - The Leopard is about an aristocrat falling from power, and Morton, the rich aristocrats on the beginning of DYS and Max eventually fall from their power and authority in the movies.

Yeah I think Leone and Visconti both have a similar image of the decadence of the wealthy.

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It's class.
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« Reply #20 on: September 01, 2005, 03:36:44 AM »

Watched it the other day at the cinema:

It's amazing. It is a masterpiece.

Concerning the last post about the decadence:

Visconti's much more subtle than Leone - his characters are not grotesque. Lancaster as the Prince oozes style and power - he is truly one of the last gattopardos and leones.

His character is tragic - in a noble kinda way. Surely one of Burts best performances - even if he is dubbed in Italian.

The film looks incredible - every shot, and I mean each and every one, looks like a painting. The compositions are marvellous and detailed to an incredible degree. Furthermore, some of these compositions are deeply meaningful, like when The Prince is having one of his conversations with Ciccio during hunting.




Hard to see here, but notice the way the prey is separating them for instance.

My favourite scene is the one where the Prince and all his family is going to church after their arrival at Donnafugata. They are covered in dust after the journey and are seated along the wall in one line. The camera travels along the faces of this family who looks like iconic mummies, like left-overs from a dusty past. And they are. Meanwhile the church organ is playing... great scene, man, their faces look like they are carved in stone. A moment like this in movies is what we are always looking for.



But please, never watch this movie on a screen too small - wait till you get the chance of wathing it in 32" or more. Ir's a long film, and not very much is happening, so if you don't get the full impact of the pictures, maybe it'll be quite hard. I would never see it on a tv screen - this was just one of the best uses of extreme widescreen I have ever seen. Class.

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« Reply #21 on: September 01, 2005, 04:59:14 AM »

Read the novel.

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Blueberry
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« Reply #22 on: September 01, 2005, 05:03:25 AM »

Nope.

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titoli
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« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2005, 03:58:03 PM »

Do.

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« Reply #24 on: September 12, 2005, 11:58:29 PM »

I just bought it and even though my right ear is clogged and buzzing, I had a headache and I didn't understand the history, I actually did enjoy it quite well and I do think that my second viewing will be way more enjoyable, especially after watching that historical documentary. I had the same problem with The Damned as well. The Damned was like watching a video documentary of hell!
The ball at the end of the movie was amazing. It felt like those long scenes that start off The Godfather movies. The scene in the office where the prince is looking at the picture and talking to Claudia and his nephew and the scene with him looking into the mirror crying made you feel for the guy Sad What I like is how Visconti's style in this film is so honest of how people are that you don't have to be told to hate or like certain characters, it just all depends on your point of view.

Now that I've seen four great of Visconti's films I can't wait to get my hands on Ludwig and Senso! Now if only there were English subtitled versions of them out there Sad It's like trying to find a decent Conformist.

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« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2007, 07:24:11 PM »

I saw this movie the other night and I fell in love with it.

The film is so beautiful, every frame is like a painting. Visconti's brilliant attention to detail alone is worth the price of admission. The ball sequence during the climax has to be the most beautiful, awe-inspiring 40 minutes of cinema to ever be printed on celluloid.

Burt Lancaster is fantastic as Don Fabrizio. I watched the 185 minute Italian subtitled version, so I didn't get to here Burt's voice. The Italian voice had a very thick Sicilian accent that fit him well. The movie also features very familiar faces from SWs such as Claudia Cardinale, Mario Girotti ( better known as Terence Hill ), Paolo Stoppa, Romolo Valli, even Giuliano Gemma shows up as Girabaldi's general.


This has become #3 on my favorite films list. Anyone interested in cinema MUST see The Leopard.

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« Reply #26 on: January 04, 2007, 07:43:21 PM »

I saw this movie the other night and I fell in love with it.

The film is so beautiful, every frame is like a painting. Visconti's brilliant attention to detail alone is worth the price of admission. The ball sequence during the climax has to be the most beautiful, awe-inspiring 40 minutes of cinema to ever be printed on celluloid.

Burt Lancaster is fantastic as Don Fabrizio. I watched the 185 minute Italian subtitled version, so I didn't get to here Burt's voice. The Italian voice had a very thick Sicilian accent that fit him well. The movie also features very familiar faces from SWs such as Claudia Cardinale, Mario Girotti ( better known as Terence Hill ), Paolo Stoppa, Romolo Valli, even Giuliano Gemma shows up as Girabaldi's general.


This has become #3 on my favorite films list. Anyone interested in cinema MUST see The Leopard.

I got it from netflix and right now the disc is sitting next to me. Will watch it this weekend.

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cigar joe
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« Reply #27 on: January 04, 2007, 07:59:13 PM »

excellent film
My favorite sequence is in the church where road dust covered Burt & family look like statues.

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« Reply #28 on: January 04, 2007, 08:02:28 PM »

excellent film
My favorite sequence is in the church where road dust covered Burt & family look like statues.

I love that scene too.

They really looked motionless and bereft of life.

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titoli
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« Reply #29 on: January 04, 2007, 08:12:07 PM »

Quote
The Italian voice had a very thick Sicilian accent that fit him well.


Uh? Are you able to distinguish the various italian accents?

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