Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 23, 2017, 11:38:16 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 4 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 751 752 [753] 754 755 ... 1166 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1805675 times)
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8388

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11280 on: December 18, 2012, 08:46:45 AM »

I didn't say it was a bad movie. I said I didn't enjoy it, but i never blamed the movie


Although truth is that I should point out that the movie really does very much involve one group having a spy in another group, without saying any spoilers, yes, the movie does involve moles, who is loyal to whom, who is spying on whom, etc. So even though I guessed wrong on this, it's not like it's way off base to suspect that all is not as it appears to be.

and interestingly enough, I didn't find myself engaging in any toe-tapping.

Though I did recently purchase (via iTunes or cd) the scores to Mystic River, Cinema Pardiso, Peyton Place, The Black Stallion, and The Big Country.

and btw, while there are a million and one cd's out there of shitty symphonies playing shitty versions of great Western themes, I must point out that there is one cd, from the City of Prague Philharmonic, called The Magnificent Westerns, with 40 Western themes, and lemme tell y'all, much of this stuff is simply unmotherfuckingbelievable. (Even the FOD and FAFDM tracks are cool; though nothing will replace the original Morricone). but y'all should heck out that cd. You can sample the shit on iTunes before purchasing it anyway. It's awesome shit though. Some is even better than on the original soundtracks.

In particular, check out their versions of themes from The Big Country and The Comancheros.



« Last Edit: December 18, 2012, 08:49:54 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11281 on: December 18, 2012, 09:05:40 AM »

Thanks Drink. The City of Prague Philharmonic is a first class outfit. I have their rerecording of Lawrence of Arabia soundtrack (shocking right?) and it's incredible stuff - they include pretty much every music cue in the movie (including minor incidental cues) and in far better quality than any other release. I have scattered tracts from other albums too.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13684

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #11282 on: December 18, 2012, 10:33:18 AM »

Decided to take my own advice and re-watched The Bride Wore Black (1968) last night. Truffaut in his faux Hitchcock period--he even uses a score by Benny Herrmann! The score is a lot of fun, actually, as Benny seems to be riffing on some of his earlier successes (at Truffaut's direction, perhaps?). The plot about a woman (Jeanne Moreau) seeking revenge for the killing of her fiance is a simple one (and derived from a Cornell Woolrich novel); her victims include Claude Rich, Michel Bouquet, Michael Lonsdale, Charles Denner, and Daniel Boulanger--in that order. The film has a marvelous conceit: each killing is tailored individually to each of the victims. This is more interesting than the abstract patterning approach you find in such films as The Abominable Dr. Phibes. Instead, each murder is preparred by the pitiless killer in situ, sometimes by reconnoitering the crime scene in advance, but more often improvisationally, in the event as it unfolds. It's a lot of fun watching these scenes develop. The murders are always apposite and therefore charming. Add to this that the victims are all men of intelligence who can be quite witty before they die. Some of the byplay had me laughing hard, in fact, I almost lost my spleen when I got to the gag that begins, "Know why the Chinese never use this finger?" Overall, a very amusing work. Film: 8/10. DVD: 3/10 (yes, isn't it about time for a format upgrade, hmmm?).

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5093


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11283 on: December 18, 2012, 12:14:46 PM »

Decided to take my own advice and re-watched The Bride Wore Black (1968) last night. Truffaut in his faux Hitchcock period--he even uses a score by Benny Herrmann! The score is a lot of fun, actually, as Benny seems to be riffing on some of his earlier successes (at Truffaut's direction, perhaps?). The plot about a woman (Jeanne Moreau) seeking revenge for the killing of her fiance is a simple one (and derived from a Cornell Woolrich novel); her victims include Claude Rich, Michel Bouquet, Michael Lonsdale, Charles Denner, and Daniel Boulanger--in that order. The film has a marvelous conceit: each killing is tailored individually to each of the victims. This is more interesting than the abstract patterning approach you find in such films as The Abominable Dr. Phibes. Instead, each murder is preparred by the pitiless killer in situ, sometimes by reconnoitering the crime scene in advance, but more often improvisationally, in the event as it unfolds. It's a lot of fun watching these scenes develop. The murders are always apposite and therefore charming. Add to this that the victims are all men of intelligence who can be quite witty before they die. Some of the byplay had me laughing hard, in fact, I almost lost my spleen when I got to the gag that begins, "Know why the Chinese never use this finger?" Overall, a very amusing work. Film: 8/10. DVD: 3/10 (yes, isn't it about time for a format upgrade, hmmm?).

Yes, definitely one of the finest Truffaut. That doesn't look Luke a Truffaut. But with some real Truffaut in it.
I'm pretty sure there is an Easter egg in this one: at some point, we're at a party, and we hear, very quick, lost in the tally background, a line from a Doisnel movie:
"Mr <I don't remember> is dead."
Which is told on the phone when the private investigator (one of Doisnel's numerous boss) dies from heart attack.
I heard it only once when watching the film on TV so I'm not 100% sure about that one, but I'm still pretty confident.

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13684

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #11284 on: December 18, 2012, 02:19:43 PM »

Another gag comes to mind. The Jeanne Moreau character sends one of her victims a concert ticket. The guy goes to the performance, intrigued by the mysterious invitation and the mysterious woman behind it. Certainly she will be in the seat next to him when he arrives. He is shown into his box: no-one is there, he sits alone. Will she come later? While he is waiting he watches the concert, a duet performed by a man and a woman. Jeanne Moreau arrives, sits, signals the man to remain silent while the music plays. There should be a sense of danger in the scene, yet Moreau has only arranged this meeting as a first step, the man is safe for another 24 hours. Truffaut then plays a neat trick: he transfers the tension that should be present between Moreau and her future victim to the on-stage performers instead. As the musicians play, Truffaut cuts rapidly back and forth, creating a performance of amazing intensity. Unlike the Albert Hall sequence in TMWKTM, the music here doesn't parallel the excitement of the characters--the music itself IS the excitement. Truffaut has turned Hitchcock inside out.

On second thought, D&D shouldn't watch this film. It's too good for him.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8388

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11285 on: December 19, 2012, 03:06:58 AM »

The Aviator (2004) 10/10 (first viewing; blu ray).

Great performances by Leo and Alan Alda, and Cate Blanchett is just spot-on with the Katherine Hepburn accent.


Though the movie only films the "glory years," and the beginning of Hughes's descent into madness, you could make a good argument that it should have at least mentioned in a postscript how he basically locked himself in a room for the last 20 years of his life. Also, there is one deleted scene on the blu ray, just after Ava Gardner tells Hughes "I'm not for sale," she asks him "how much is a person worth," and Hughes responds "$20,000" and tells Gardner how he once accidentally killed a pedestrian while driving down the street -- he's not certain if he wasn't paying attention, or if the pedestrian stepped in front of the car -- and he settled with the family for $20K. Well I don't know why they would delete that scene. It's only a minute or two long, and if this incident really happened, it's a relevant to a story about this part of Hughes life.
So, they delete this scene and any reference to Hughes later being a hermit -- are they trying to make him look better?

Anyway, this is a terrific film. A couple of weeks ago I saw Mystic River and said it was probably the best movie I'd seen from this millenium; well The Aviator is top five.

« Last Edit: December 31, 2012, 01:07:19 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5093


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11286 on: December 19, 2012, 04:11:19 AM »

It's only a minute or two long, and if this incident really happened, it's a relevant to a story about this part of Hughes life.
So, they delete this scene and any reference to Hughes later being a hermit -- are they trying to make him look better?

Well 2 minutes can be incredibly long. It depends of the point of the story where these 2 minutes are supposed to be spent. You often have to cut your best work out of a movie just because there is no way to include it. I have not seen the scene and have no idea where it was supposed to be so I'm basically talking about nothing here, but the point remains: 2 minutes is damn long.

They're not trying to make him look better: Scorsese said that in his opinion, EVERYBODY knows about the last 20 years of Hughes life, so it was more interesting to focus on the rest (that is more interesting anyway). In the first script (it was may be even shot), they had him as an old man at the end. May be it responded better to the opening sequence... But what's the point? I find the "Way of the future" ending much better as it emphasizes on the 2 main aspects of his life: him as a visionary man, and (the repetition, the madness) him as a crazy lost dude. He crafted our present (his future) and was already doomed at that point. I like the double meaning.

Anyway, glad you liked the movie! It's a very underrated one IMO. It has some major structure flaws to me, drags in the second part, and the opening sucks (looks like a cheap and cheesy TV production), but it's still amazing. And technically incredible.

« Last Edit: December 19, 2012, 04:13:26 AM by noodles_leone » Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8388

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11287 on: December 19, 2012, 06:50:30 AM »

Well 2 minutes can be incredibly long. It depends of the point of the story where these 2 minutes are supposed to be spent. You often have to cut your best work out of a movie just because there is no way to include it. I have not seen the scene and have no idea where it was supposed to be so I'm basically talking about nothing here, but the point remains: 2 minutes is damn long.

They're not trying to make him look better: Scorsese said that in his opinion, EVERYBODY knows about the last 20 years of Hughes life, so it was more interesting to focus on the rest (that is more interesting anyway). In the first script (it was may be even shot), they had him as an old man at the end. May be it responded better to the opening sequence... But what's the point? I find the "Way of the future" ending much better as it emphasizes on the 2 main aspects of his life: him as a visionary man, and (the repetition, the madness) him as a crazy lost dude. He crafted our present (his future) and was already doomed at that point. I like the double meaning.

Anyway, glad you liked the movie! It's a very underrated one IMO. It has some major structure flaws to me, drags in the second part, and the opening sucks (looks like a cheap and cheesy TV production), but it's still amazing. And technically incredible.

in a movie that's 170 minutes long, is one extra scene that's at most two minutes long all that big a deal? I can't imagibe it was cut entirely for time. The only reason it really caught my eye is cuz it is the only deleted scene included in the bonus features. Of course, that doesn't necessarily mean it was the only scene that was shot but not included in the film, but I just wondered if it was coincidental that the scene they removed is one of an unpleasant story. True, you can argue that it really has nothing to do with the storyline of Hughes's contributions to aviation (and to a lesser extent, cinema) and his descent into madness. And nobody is saying that Hughes killed the guy purposely. But if it's a significant event from the period in his life that the movie covers, then IMO they should have included it. But it's not a huge deal either way.

As for the fact that everyone knows Hughes was a crazy old man living as a hermit, who is everyone? Maybe everyone that's of a certain age (eg. Leo said that initially, that's all he knew about Hughes; it wasn't until he visited a  bookstore and happened to see a book about Hughes the aviator that he realized all this guy had accomplished, and then decided to make a movie about him). But I don't think younger people (eg. below 30) know much about him. The only reason I ever heard of him is cuz I am a fan of classical cinema. And then I read his wikipedia page so I learned about all his life story. But I'd bet that if I asked 10 people my age (I am 28) if they ever heard of Hughes, at least 8 will say they haven't, unless they either saw The Aviator, or are a fan of classic cinema and know his movies. Unfortunately, there aren't many people my age that care deeply about movies of the 30's, 40's, and 50's. Maybe they have seen Gone With the Wind or Casablnaca, but that's about it. And, not being an engineer or an inventor, I doubt many of them heard of his aviation accomplishments.

So I don't think they know about his  last 20 years. Of course, it's pretty obvious by the end of the movie where he is headed. But some brief text at the end of the movie saying something like "For the last 20 years of his life, Hughes lived in seclusion, etc. until his death in 1976. He remains the greatest innovator in aviation history." That would tell the story of his final years, while emphasizing that the main point of the movie is to celebrate his accomplishments.

As far as I am concerned, banging all those babes is the greatest accomplishment of all. But banging Katharine Hepburn is nauseating. That woman looked like she was 70 years old, even when she was 30

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8388

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11288 on: December 19, 2012, 07:03:07 AM »

Just saw Il Posto

It's a great movie, but the ending happens so suddenly, it's weird. I had a hard time with the ending, though the more I think it over, the more I'm okay with it. It's just that when you're watching it, it just ends abruptly, out of nowhere.

« Last Edit: December 31, 2012, 01:07:45 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5093


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11289 on: December 19, 2012, 07:09:29 AM »

in a movie that's 170 minutes long, is one extra scene that's at most two minutes long all that big a deal?

Yes it is. The length of the movie has nothing to do with it. Believe me, I've edited videos ranging from 15 seconds to 60 minutes and even with 60 minutes, removing a few shots can GREATLY improve the pacing. Sometimes the story just has to keeps going (and sometimes it has to pause).
All in all, the content and length of the scene is just as important as the point of the movie where you want to insert it.

I've recently read an interview of the editor of Polanski talking about Tess. They removed a scene from the begining that was almost Roman and his editor's favorite scene from the movie. Just for the sake of pacing. The editor said in that interview: "a scene that is still haunting me".

Quote
And, not being an engineer or an inventor, I doubt many of them heard of his aviation accomplishments.

Yes, that's the point of the movie!

Quote
So I don't think they know about his  last 20 years.

Well I don't think either. Actually I didn't really know myself (I'm 26). I mean I had heard from that. I knew about his movies and if someone mentioned his last 20 years, I would have said "yes, I seem to remember that". Then, when they released the movie, it was quite impossible to not know since, here in France, they spent hours on TV, radio and the Internet talking about his life.
I'm not arguing with you, it wouldn't have really armed the movie to put a text at the end talking about it (although it's a bit too "biopic" for my taste). I'm just saying: hey, in the end, does it really matter? THe guy did incredible movies, ran incredible companies, did incredible stunts,banged incredible girls, was incredible... Madness isn't that interesting to me, especially in movies. It was a smart move to focus on the interesting years instead of doing a regular biopic, and ending the way they did is consistent with that choice.

In a way, that's the line I draw between GOOD biopics (that make choices and focus on the director's/autor's vision) and BAD biopics (that try to tell everything about the life of the subject, hence trying to link bad education with quest for success and other bullshit, and end up telling/saying nothing => do a documentary instead!).

« Last Edit: December 19, 2012, 07:16:58 AM by noodles_leone » Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8388

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11290 on: December 19, 2012, 07:32:47 AM »



Well I don't think either. Actually I didn't really know myself (I'm 26). I mean I had heard from that. I knew about his movies and if someone mentioned his last 20 years, I would have said "yes, I seem to remember that". Then, when they released the movie, it was quite impossible to not know since, here in France, they spent hours on TV, radio and the Internet talking about his life.
I'm not arguing with you, it wouldn't have really armed the movie to put a text at the end talking about it (although it's a bit too "biopic" for my taste). I'm just saying: hey, in the end, does it really matter? THe guy did incredible movies, ran incredible companies, did incredible stunts,banged incredible girls, was incredible... Madness isn't that interesting to me, especially in movies. It was a smart move to focus on the interesting years instead of doing a regular biopic, and ending the way they did is consistent with that choice.

In a way, that's the line I draw between GOOD biopics (that make choices and focus on the director's/autor's vision) and BAD biopics (that try to tell everything about the life of the subject, hence trying to link bad education with quest for success and other bullshit, and end up telling/saying nothing => do a documentary instead!).

well they didn't have to harp on it, but his madness was as much a part of his life, and as well-known, as his accomplishments in aviation and filmmaking. they don't have to mention every detail, but the fact that the richest man in the world spent 20 years as a prisoner in a room in Beverly Hills is a pretty darn important aspect of his life.

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13684

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #11291 on: December 19, 2012, 11:29:00 AM »

Just saw Il Posto

It's a great movie, but the ending happens so suddenly, it's weird. I had a hard time with the ending, though the more I think it over, the more I'm okay with it. It's just that when you're watching it, it just ends abruptly, out of nowhere.
True, but I think that's appropriate for what the film is about. He's got his "posto" and he'll be stuck with it the rest of his life. The movie could just go on and on. The ending reminds us that it--or any ending used--would be arbitrary. The fact that the ending by being abrupt calls attention to itself seems like a valid strategy.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8388

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11292 on: December 19, 2012, 02:17:24 PM »

truth is, I'm not really sure what the point is.

Obviously, the main character is setting himself up for a life just like all those men in the room; if we fast-forward 30 years, he will be in the same place, just like them, only maybe a few desks forward as some others will have died.

But really, is it so terrible? It ain't glamorous and he's not going to be rich, but not everyone wants to eg. get a higher education, or be an entrepreneur. There are many people who choose a life of a 9-5 job, knowing it will be there every day, the security of a monthly paycheck, which -- as his father says -- may not be large, but will be there every month. The people at work look to be reasonably nice people; the work obviously isn't that hard; there's no mean boss or anything like that. So, he's not going to be Rockefeller, but he can certainly get married, have a family, and live a happy and content life. I certainly wouldn't call his a miserable life.

Another documentary-style movie I recently saw which ends abruptly is "Killer of Sheep," (although that is much more of a documentary, with much less of a story), and I couldn't help but compare it a little. And in that movie, life is indeed going nowhere. Life SUCKS, and they are basically trapped in that jail. Everything is miserable, and they know it.

But the boy in Il Posto  won't experience anything remotely close to that. If, in 30 years from now, he is in the same place as those other men in the room, it will be the life he has chosen -- a life that is probably typical of the majority of people in Western countries --and he may well be a happy man.

I have seen some comments about how the movie is supposed to be showing the impersonal nature of the corporate world, etc. Maybe that's true but I don't know if that's such a big deal. These people want to show up, earn a paycheck, and go home. That's all. And that's just what they're going to get.

« Last Edit: December 23, 2012, 05:51:07 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8388

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11293 on: December 20, 2012, 12:37:29 PM »

Walk on the Wild Side (1962) 8/10


Jane Fonda has a really good performance; Anne Baxter does a perfectly convincing Mexican accent

« Last Edit: December 31, 2012, 01:08:05 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12728


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #11294 on: December 20, 2012, 04:11:13 PM »

Klute (1971) a real snoozefest literally, fell asleep  Sad

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Pages: 1 ... 751 752 [753] 754 755 ... 1166 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.047 seconds with 19 queries.