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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1796901 times)
dave jenkins
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« Reply #17415 on: October 18, 2017, 08:00:54 AM »

Yeah, the film looks gorgeous but that trick is the one that aged poorly. Zooming in/out didn't have that cheap connotation at the time and that kind of use was still quite new (I'd say about 15 years old). I get that it was done to emulate the way paintings are shot, but it's definitely cringeworthy.
Zooming out works a lot better than zooming in. But overuse of anything is always a bad choice.

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« Reply #17416 on: October 18, 2017, 09:47:43 AM »

Zooming out works a lot better than zooming in. But overuse of anything is always a bad choice.

When it comes to zooming, the general rule would be "don't make it noticeable". Of course, there are great counter examples (zooming in on Bronson's face in the final duel of OUTITW).

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« Reply #17417 on: October 18, 2017, 10:46:54 AM »

Barry Lyndon (1975) - 10/10. My favorite Kubrick, now out in a fabulous Criterion edition (a 10/10 for that as well). If the film has a fault it is its over-reliance on the reverse zoom effect. The trick is a good one, though: we begin on a detail in close-up, then rapidly retreat until a stunning composition (usually a quotation of a painting) is revealed. Motion pictures, what? The new supplements on this edition are mostly in-house jobs. There is a bit on the cinematography, the editing, the art direction (this last conducted by Frayling (as he is an authority on Ken Adam)). One of the best pieces is a more general "making of" bit, with the usual suspects yakking in 2017, but also bits of vintage audio from the great man himself. For the first time I have heard it from Stanley's mouth: the reason he chose Handel's Sarabande was because it was the 18th Century work he could find that sounded most like Morricone!

Might have to pick this up.  Afro

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« Reply #17418 on: October 18, 2017, 11:30:42 AM »

Barry Lyndon (1975) - 10/10. My favorite Kubrick,

I don't think I've seen every Kubrick, but out of the ones I've seen, I would certainly agree.

When it comes to zooming, the general rule would be "don't make it noticeable". Of course, there are great counter examples (zooming in on Bronson's face in the final duel of OUTITW).

And I think it's actually the great counter-examples that truly demonstrate the artistry in film-making. It's the same old adage for editing too which is why people often mistakenly say that an editor cannot be an auteur - i.e. their work should just blend in unnoticed and seamlessly. Yet, the great editors are the ones who edit in a way that really jumps out at you. However, just like the overuse of the zoom, these great editors prefigured the later move towards ridiculous jump cuts all over the place often combined with shaky cameras that just end up as head-ache inducing muddles.

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« Reply #17419 on: October 19, 2017, 08:33:23 AM »

The Sea Wolf (1941) - 8/10. Michael Curtiz adapts Jack London, and it's a corker! Edward G. Robinson is the evil/insane Captain Ahab QueegWolf Larsen. Shipping out on this voyage of the damned is fiery John Garfield, weepy Ida Lupino, a young Alexander Knox (Knox was young once?) a drunk Gene Lockhart, a demented Barry Fitzgerald . . . and for good measure, Howard da Silva and a crew of degenerates. Warner went back to something like the O-neg of a silver nitrate print or something to come up with the image--this is the best black and white transfer I've ever seen. Happily, Warner did this one themselves. I shudder to think what The House of Contrast would have done with this material. PQ: 11/10.

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« Reply #17420 on: October 20, 2017, 06:33:32 AM »

The Sea Wolf (1941) - 8/10. Michael Curtiz adapts Jack London, and it's a corker! Edward G. Robinson is the evil/insane Captain Ahab QueegWolf Larsen. Shipping out on this voyage of the damned is fiery John Garfield, weepy Ida Lupino, a young Alexander Knox (Knox was young once?) a drunk Gene Lockhart, a demented Barry Fitzgerald . . . and for good measure, Howard da Silva and a crew of degenerates. Warner went back to something like the O-neg of a silver nitrate print or something to come up with the image--this is the best black and white transfer I've ever seen. Happily, Warner did this one themselves. I shudder to think what The House of Contrast would have done with this material. PQ: 11/10.

A) so now you're bashing Criterion, which you used to speak of in terms reserved only for Eddie Muller and Japanese women? Shocked

B) You neglect to mention the fact that this BRD is the first opportunity for those of us who were not alive in 1941 to see the full 100-minute theatrical release, 14 minutes longer than the one we've been seeing till now http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=296769

C) I saw this once, a while ago, on TCM. I can't find my review here; I must not have posted about it. I definitely gave it something between a 7/10 and 8/10 (which is a big difference; 7/10 means "good" but I'd probably not purchase the disc; 8/10 means "very good"). Anyway, considering that this BRD is not available for rental on Netflix (I don't think Netflix gets Warner Archive BRD's) and that it's only $18 on Amazon, I'll make the purchase  Smiley

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« Reply #17421 on: October 20, 2017, 07:40:55 AM »


B) You neglect to mention the fact that this BRD is the first opportunity for those of us who were not alive in 1941 to see the full 100-minute theatrical release, 14 minutes longer than the one we've been seeing till now http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=296769
Why should I do something that you're going to do anyway?

T-Men (1947) - 7/10. A good film with a rather dull story and some bad plotting (Dennis O'Keefe takes great pains to insinuate himself into the Detroit Mob and then . . . just leaves town to follow a lead! He thinks nothing of jeopardizing his standing with the crooks? And the Department doesn't have other agents who can help him work the case?) Much of the plotting can be forgiven, though, for the sake of John Alton's photography (Thank you, Anthony Mann, for staying out of his way). The new Classic Flicks Blu-ray does it justice, too. Bring on Raw Deal!

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« Reply #17422 on: October 21, 2017, 06:52:34 AM »

Your Vice Is A Locked Room And Only I Have The Key aka Il Tuo Vizio È Una Stanza Chiusa E Solo Io Ne Ho La Chiave (1972): A very loose giallo adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's story The Black Cat. Anita Strindberg is mentally and physically abused by her husband Luigi Pistilli. When his lover is murdered, Strindberg is convinced he's the killer, esp when their maid is killed in similar fashion in their hom and he forces her to hide the body. Then his niece, the free-spirited Edwige Fenech, arrives for a surprise visit and things spiral out of control. And yes, there is a black cat. A nice atmospheric giallo that starts slow but ends with a frantic 30 minutes of twists and turns. 7/10

Watched this one on the Arrow UK blu-ray, which looks good. I watched the Italian dub, as it was less distracting than the English dub. Still annoying tho when the spoken words don't match the lips.

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« Reply #17423 on: October 23, 2017, 02:11:06 AM »

The Night Has Eyes (1942): Schoolteachers Joyce Howard and Tucker McGuire go on a trip to the Yorkshire moors where a fellow schoolteacher disappeared a year before. They get caught in a storm and find shelter in the secluded mansion of James Mason. Despite his acrimonious behavior, Howard falls for Mason. But he is prone to rather peculiar, dangerous, behavior when there's a full moon... Nicely done mystery thriller with plenty of atmosphere (mansion with a hidden room, foggy moors, ...), but a bit slow at times. 6+/10

Watched this on the Network UK DVD. Good picture quality, sound is a bit thin/muffled at times, I wish they would have included subtitles.

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« Reply #17424 on: October 23, 2017, 09:42:10 AM »

A Danielle Darrieux weekend (to mark her passing).

La Desordre et la nuit (1958) - 7/10. DD has only a supporting role in this. The female lead is supplied by a very foxy Nadja Tiller. She has "daddy issues" apparently, and takes up with the ancient Mr. Trenchcoat himself, Jean Gabin. The plot--about busting up a drug ring--isn't particularly interesting. The dialog by Michel Audiard, however, is.

Marie-Octobre (1959) - 6/10. At a 15-year reunion for Resistance network members, the question is asked: Back in the day, who betrayed us and why? A whole lot of dull chat goes on until the traitor is finally exposed. The decision not to use flashbacks was a mistake. Anyway, the solution itself isn't very interesting, so I doubt I'll be rescreening this anytime soon.
 

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« Reply #17425 on: October 24, 2017, 05:14:34 AM »

A Portrait Of Murder aka Laura (1955): A 45m TV remake of the classic novel/noir 'Laura'. It's surprisingly watchable, removing all fluff from the movie, while keeping the core intact (as well as the scene where MacPherson visits Lydecker while he's taking a bath!). George Sanders is no Clifton Webb, but at least he's got the right persona for playing Waldo Lydecker. Dana Wynter is no match for Gene Tierney however. All in all tho, I really enjoyed it, even if it doesn't come close to the original. Things just move at a rapid pace, so don't blink. Recommended! 7/10

Available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EcDnqjTLJs

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« Reply #17426 on: October 24, 2017, 08:28:57 AM »

The Bloody Brood (1959) another beatnik and bongo noir starring Peter Falk. 5/10

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« Reply #17427 on: October 24, 2017, 10:22:53 AM »

La fête à Henriette (1952) 8/10. Paris When It Sizzles is the inferior English-language remake. The original is the real deal.

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« Reply #17428 on: October 25, 2017, 06:29:59 AM »

Je t'attendrai (1939) - 7/10. During WW1, a train is stopped by a bombing. A young soldier takes advantage of the opportunity to go to his nearby native village to see his parents and find out why his fiancée has stopped writing him . . . He has only an hour to go and come back before the tracks are repaired. If he doesn't return on time he will be a deserter and likely executed. His sergeant, who gave him permission to go, will likewise be in trouble. Naturally, once the soldier gets home, complications ensue. This is a very nicely handled situation film, with cross cutting between the town and the work being done on the rails. You will believe that train tracks can be repaired! It is a pleasure to see a film of this vintage with so much location work. The heroine, Corinne Luchaire, is cute, and we wait the whole of the runtime to hear her shout out the title, "Je t'attendrai!" Nary a dry eye in the house at that point. I'm guessing this is another film that that phony Frenchman noodles_leone has never seen.

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« Reply #17429 on: October 26, 2017, 06:48:26 AM »

Mikey And Nicky (1976) Director Elaine May, despite all the on set controversies hits it out of the ballpark, The film is a Neo Noir
gem. Powerful performances by real life long time friends, Cassavetes and Falk, informs the piece, they got chemistry, the friendship depicted is alive with a vitality that's well, authentic. The rest of the cast  Ned Beatty, M. Emmet Walsh, Carol Grace, Sanford Meisner, William Hickey, Joyce Van Patten, and Rose Arrick round out an excellent supporting cast.  9/10

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