Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
September 26, 2018, 07:35:44 AM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 and 2 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 ... 1166 1167 [1168] 1169 1170 ... 1199
: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  ( 2244169 )
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8717

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #17505 : November 26, 2017, 06:43:31 PM »

The Crime of Monsieur Lange is definitely a comedy. Maybe a comedy/drama, but certainly not a straight drama.

p.s. Lang's Human Desire is better than Renoir's La Bete Humaine.


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 13128


easy come easy go


« #17506 : November 26, 2017, 08:04:55 PM »

The Fat Man (1951) P.I. crime film directed by William Castle. Based on a radio drama of the same name, with J. Scott Smart. It's sort of a rip off of Nero Wolfe but it has a nice cast.  Julie London, Rock Hudson, Jayne Meadows, John Russell, and Emmett Kelly. 6-7/10.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3121



« #17507 : November 27, 2017, 02:26:32 AM »

As Drink says, now that I've finally seen the film I don't think much of it. But then, I'm not all that keen on Renoir in general.

I'm not that keen on Renoir either, but Mr Lange was one I really liked.

I watched a few of his older films some months ago, and while they always has some extraordinary scenes, I did not really enjoyed them as a whole, and did not care much about characters and stories.
Despite some technically advanced stuff they feel often outdated, while other very old films still look fresh.

Fresh and often even modern looking films from a long ago past, which I watched in the last year, were e.g. The Love of Jeanne Ney (Pabst, 1927) or The Salvation Hunters (von Sternberg, 1925). (And now I'm curious what Arsenal (Dowshenko, 1929) can do for me)

Compared to these, which were very entertaining, I was glad when I was through with Renoir's Boudou and La Chienne. And while I meanwhile understand most of the greatness of La Rčgle du jeu, I still don't understand why La Grande Illusion became such a famous film.


stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3121



« #17508 : November 27, 2017, 02:28:30 AM »

The Crime of Monsieur Lange is definitely a comedy. Maybe a comedy/drama, but certainly not a straight drama.


Renoir often mixes some farcical elements in his "serious" films, but calling them comedies is absolutely misleading.


noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5346


Lonesome Billy


« #17509 : November 27, 2017, 02:49:08 AM »

I still don't understand why La Grande Illusion became such a famous film.

It's all about the concept. The fact that its 1937 worldview (hypocrisy of the idea of nation, globalized 1% vs the 99%) is still very much relevant in 2017 is quite fascinating. While impressively well crafted for the time, the film often gets boring to me but it's still one of these rare occasions when an artist showed to be a true visionary.



New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
XhcnoirX
Gunslinger
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 344


« #17510 : November 27, 2017, 05:45:01 AM »

The Fat Man (1951) P.I. crime film directed by William Castle. Based on a radio drama of the same name, with J. Scott Smart. It's sort of a rip off of Nero Wolfe but it has a nice cast.  Julie London, Rock Hudson, Jayne Meadows, John Russell, and Emmett Kelly. 6-7/10.

Saw it a while ago. A decent movie but too lightweight (pun intended) to be memorable, but not lighthearted or witty enough to compare to 'The Thin Man' (depending on source, Dashiel Hammett was somewhat involved with the radio show). A 6/10 for me.


'I feel all dead inside. I'm backed up in a dark corner and I don't know who's hitting me.' - The Dark Corner (1946)
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 13128


easy come easy go


« #17511 : November 27, 2017, 07:27:49 AM »

No Man's Woman (1955) Marie Windsor double-crosses five people and is murdered by one of them. Nothing special 6/10


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3121



« #17512 : November 27, 2017, 10:28:10 AM »

It's all about the concept. The fact that its 1937 worldview (hypocrisy of the idea of nation, globalized 1% vs the 99%) is still very much relevant in 2017 is quite fascinating. While impressively well crafted for the time, the film often gets boring to me but it's still one of these rare occasions when an artist showed to be a true visionary.

I know that all, still I don't see much interesting things in it from a modern point of view, only some good looking depth of focus photography.

I did not get it in the 80s, I do not get it now why La Grande Illusion is still that famous. There are so many better French films in the 30s.


drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8717

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #17513 : November 27, 2017, 11:03:12 AM »

It's all about the concept. The fact that its 1937 worldview (hypocrisy of the idea of nation, globalized 1% vs the 99%) is still very much relevant in 2017 is quite fascinating. While impressively well crafted for the time, the film often gets boring to me but it's still one of these rare occasions when an artist showed to be a true visionary.

I read  few parts of Renoir's book https://goo.gl/47J3F6  (It does not seem like a very good book. But when discussing Grand Illusion, he talks about how he was a pilot in WWI, how much he hated his superior officers, how he felt more of a kinship with the Germans pilots than with his own French superior officers. That certainly comes through with Grand Illusion.

I have just two complaints about this great movie: A) Gabin, von Stroheim, and Dalio are so good, Pierre Fresnay is just ordinary by comparison. Like Paul Henreid in Casablanca. Not terrible, but among such great performances, he's clearly not up to par. B) The music during the scene where Fresnay is distracting von Stroheim, is IMO inappropriate, totally the wrong tone.

It always strikes me how the "cultured" German military would just a few years later become genocidal maniacs.

Regarding themes of the movie, here are a few paragraphs from Roger Ebert's grand review https://goo.gl/FQQmvB

It's not a movie about a prison escape, nor is it jingoistic in its politics; it's a meditation on the collapse of the old order of European civilization. Perhaps that was always a sentimental upper-class illusion, the notion that gentlemen on both sides of the lines subscribed to the same code of behavior. Whatever it was, it died in the trenches of World War I.


"Neither you nor I can stop the march of time,” the captured French aristocrat Capt. de Boieldieu tells the German prison camp commandant, Von Rauffenstein. A little later, distracting the guards during an escape of others from the high-security German fortress, the Frenchman forces the German to shoot him, reluctantly, and they have a final deathbed exchange. `" didn't know a bullet in the stomach hurt so much,” he tells the German. "I aimed at your legs,” says the German, near tears. And a little later he says: "For a commoner, dying in a war is a tragedy. But for you and I--it's a good way out.”

What the Frenchman knows and the German won't admit is that the new world belongs to commoners. It changed hands when the gentlemen of Europe declared war. And the "grand illusion” of Renoir's title is the notion that the upper classes somehow stand above war. The German cannot believe that his prisoners, whom he treats almost as guests, would try to escape. After all, they have given their word not to.

... The break from the fortress prison produces the touching deathbed farewell between De Boeldier and von Rauffenstein, which is the film's most touching scene, and then we join the workingman Marechal and the banker Rosenthal as they try to escape by walking cross-country through German territory. They're given shelter by a farm widow who sees security in Marechal, and perhaps Renoir is whispering that the true class connection across enemy lines is between the workers, not the rulers.



There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8717

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #17514 : November 27, 2017, 11:15:04 AM »

Anatomy of a Murder (1959) 10/10

Third viewing, TCM.


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Jessica Rabbit
Gunslinger
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 398


« #17515 : November 27, 2017, 01:24:52 PM »

CJ, I saw No Man's Woman a while ago and agree. It was good as long as Windsor was alive, after that not so much. This is what I wrote last time:

This is (quasi) Noir only by virtue of Marie Windsor’s presence. In the best Crawford and Davis tradition of gloriously over-the-top bitchiness, Windsor hams it up for all it’s worth and could give those two a run for their money. The movie is not nearly in the same league as the brilliant The Narrow Margin or The Killing, but Windsor obviously had fun playing the part though her performance verges on cartoonish occasionally. She’s a Bad Bad girl, a “witch...whichever way it's spelled” and gets herself killed for her antics. Once she’s dead though, the fun and excitement come to an abrupt halt, because the rest of the cast can’t compete in the ham and cheese department. Unfortunately, the script writers didn’t get the memo that says you shouldn’t kill off the most entertaining character halfway through. Watch it for Windsor.


Jessica Rabbit
"I'm not bad. I'm just drawn that way."
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 13128


easy come easy go


« #17516 : November 27, 2017, 04:44:28 PM »

CJ, I saw No Man's Woman a while ago and agree. It was good as long as Windsor was alive, after that not so much. This is what I wrote last time:

This is (quasi) Noir only by virtue of Marie Windsor’s presence. In the best Crawford and Davis tradition of gloriously over-the-top bitchiness, Windsor hams it up for all it’s worth and could give those two a run for their money. The movie is not nearly in the same league as the brilliant The Narrow Margin or The Killing, but Windsor obviously had fun playing the part though her performance verges on cartoonish occasionally. She’s a Bad Bad girl, a “witch...whichever way it's spelled” and gets herself killed for her antics. Once she’s dead though, the fun and excitement come to an abrupt halt, because the rest of the cast can’t compete in the ham and cheese department. Unfortunately, the script writers didn’t get the memo that says you shouldn’t kill off the most entertaining character halfway through. Watch it for Windsor.


 O0 It was a bit of a time waster, check out The Fat Man (Youtube) it was a little better.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
PowerRR
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3102


« #17517 : November 28, 2017, 08:40:17 AM »

Phantom Thread (2017) - 8/10
PT Anderson strikes again. I think most people including myself will like this more than Inherent Vice.

XhcnoirX
Gunslinger
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 344


« #17518 : November 28, 2017, 10:57:30 AM »

Model For Murder (1959): Keith Andes gets framed for the murder of a fashion model who walked in on a jewel robbery organized by her boss, fashion designer Michael Gough. Nothing special, but at about 70mins it's a decent time-waster. 6/10

Watched this on the Network UK DVD.


'I feel all dead inside. I'm backed up in a dark corner and I don't know who's hitting me.' - The Dark Corner (1946)
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 13128


easy come easy go


« #17519 : November 28, 2017, 10:58:19 AM »

Phantom Thread (2017) - 8/10
PT Anderson strikes again. I think most people including myself will like this more than Inherent Vice.

Yea I was underwhelmed by Inherent Vice.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
: 1 ... 1166 1167 [1168] 1169 1170 ... 1199  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.063137