Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
February 26, 2024, 05:15:39 PM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 and 27 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 ... 1174 1175 [1176] 1177 1178 ... 1399
: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  ( 4964257 )
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16703


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #17625 : February 22, 2018, 07:57:58 AM »

To amplify: by "TV" I mean the kind of threadbare writing typical of the medium. Here is an example from an early point in the movie (NB: This is not an exact transcription, but it would pass Dan Rather's "fake but accurate" standard):

Quote
Scene One:
T’Challa (Black Panther): I’ll just swoop down now and extract T’Cherry from her secret mission.
Scary Bald Bitch: Be sure not to freeze when you see T’Cherry.
T’Challa: Hey, no way! I’m not gonna freeze when I see the girl I love. Why would I do that? Uh-uh. Not happening. Wouldn’t happen in a million years. No, no, no, no, no.

Scene Two:
T’Challa: [tongue-tied and frozen] Oh, hi,  T’Ch-ch-ch . . .
T’Cherry: Look out! There’s an anonymous bad guy getting ready to kill you!
Scary Bald Bitch: [clubbing anonymous bad guy before turning an accusing eye on T’Challa] You froze!
T’Challa: I didn’t!

Scene Three:
T’Sister: Did he freeze?
Scary Bald Bitch: Yup.
T’Challa: I didn’t! Stop being so mean to me!

[In the audience, every moron laughing hysterically.]
And you have to put up with 2 more hours of that kind of thing.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16703


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #17626 : February 23, 2018, 05:30:37 AM »

Sawdust and Tinsel / Gycklarnas afton (1953) - 8/10. In turn-of-the-century Sweden—19th to 20th, natch—the circus comes to town. Trouble is, it’s not a very good circus, as its destitute ringleader (Ake Gronberg) knows. His mistress, the bareback rider (Harriet Andersson) also knows. Both want out of their relationship and their lives as circus people, and are hoping the provincial town they’ve come to will provide them with the means of escape. But, as they will separately learn, bourgeois life is for them illusory, and anyway, the show must go on. Bergman makes the connection between the circus and the theater explicit, so this film could be considered the first of a theater trilogy that continues with Smiles Of a Summer Night (1955) and concludes with The Magician (1958). According to Peter Cowie, who provides commentary of the Criterion disc, the film owes a lot to one with Emil Jannings—I think it’s called Jealousy (1925)--but with lines from Strindberg thrown in. Cowie is a knowledgeable man, and I don’t doubt what he says, but Professor Jenkins was struck by how similar the movie is to a couple made by Ozu, A Story of Floating Weeds (1934), and its remake, Floating Weeds (1959). It’s unlikely, however, that Ozu and Bergman knew each other’s work. N.B. This is the first time Bergman worked with Sven Nykvist, one of 3 cinematographers on the picture.
The Bergman retro down at Film Forum continues apace. Unhappily, I can't get down there for every screening. Happily, though, the Jenkins Home Video Collection is replete with many of the titles already. Dusted off this old Criterion disc and gave it a spin. Dusted off my old review which--amazing to tell--accurately expresses my current feelings almost 5 years before the fact.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9922

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #17627 : February 23, 2018, 12:23:37 PM »

Crossfire (1947) 8/10 (TCM; third viewing)


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2386



« #17628 : February 24, 2018, 01:23:43 PM »

To back up Jenkins, I absolutely despise the Marvel movies or the "Universe". They look like shit with a color palette ranging from a cement block to a cement block, the scores, er, muzak, is mundane, generic background noise at its most effective, the comedy is just cringe worthy and the writing is Save the Cat trash with no real stakes, weak villains, over-powered protagonists and is a bloated, 2+ hour TV episode that only serves a purpose for the next episode to air and to spin off as many of the characters into identical piece of shit spinoffs/sequels/prequels that lack any and all creative integrity.

In other words, the "MCU" is focus group trash. And it's disgusting that this lowest common denominator model has been so successful. They put all of their chips into appealing to the uneducated viewer, the teenager, the focus group fat ass, et al and they won huge. That's just fucking awful.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6635


Lonesome Billy


« #17629 : February 24, 2018, 11:52:14 PM »

I totally agree but the big avantage of creating a complete universe and flooding the world with content is that at some point you end up with a powerful mythology (whatever turds you’re doing) and once you have that, you have the ability to work on much more interesting stuff. Logan is a great example of that (and the black and white version looks absoly gorgeous). To a lesser example, the Netflix/Marvel show Daredevil isn’t great but takes place in Hell’s Kitchen after NYC was partly destroyed by the avengers: it’s a much darker look at the consequences of the superhero’s adventures.


XhcnoirX
Gunslinger
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 371


« #17630 : February 26, 2018, 03:31:38 AM »

Watched several movies over the weekend...

The Locket (1946): Laraine Day is about to marry Gene Raymond, when ex-husband Brian Aherne warns him about her, and her past (which also includes Robert Mitchum). Primarily known for its flashback within a flashback within a flashback, this psychological noir/melodrama is highly enjoyable, altho it does lack some tension. 8/10

Don't Torture A Duckling (1972): Italian thriller/giallo about a small town where several young boys are killed for no apparent reason. Plenty of symbolism and red herrings, as well as a naked Barbara Bouchet :D, make this a 7/10

The Commuter (2018): Decided to catch one of Liam Neeson's final action thrillers in the cinema. I like him as an actor, but I'm glad he's finally abandoning this niche he carved out for himself. It's expertly made but everything about this movie is a cliché. 6-/10

The St. Louis Bank Robbery (1959): Based on an actual bank robbery gone wrong, this heist movie focuses more on the robbers than on the robbery itself. Quite interesting with its fly-on-the-wall approach, it's not a typical Hollywood heist movie. Also has an early role for Steve McQueen. 7-/10


'I feel all dead inside. I'm backed up in a dark corner and I don't know who's hitting me.' - The Dark Corner (1946)
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16703


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #17631 : February 26, 2018, 08:22:02 AM »

The Silence (1963) - 1/10. Pretentious and dull is not a formula for success. I think the inept use of rear projection in this is what Trier was sending up in Europa/Zentropa.

The Magician (1958) - 8/10. Pretentious and inspired, on the other hand, can pay dividends. As with Sawdust and Tinsel, the director underlines the connection between traveling performers and the theater. He then goes one step beyond to suggest that theater has replaced the empty rituals of organized religion. Not much of an idea, but at least it gives us insight into the way Bergman thinks.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16703


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #17632 : February 27, 2018, 05:47:33 AM »

Saint Jack (1978) - 6/10. Ben Gazzara IS Jackie TreehornJack Flowers, a brothel owner in Singapore during the Vietnam War. The local Chinese gangsters, however, make things tough for him. He befriends an ex-pat Brit (Denholm Elliot) who has a dream of going back home to England, but the man dies--there's no going home, for him or for Jack. This is Bogdanovich at his most Cassavetes-like. The lack of plot is compensated for by Gazzara's charisma and the Singapore locations. Happily, the current home video release has a then-and-now locations comparison piece. A few places remain--the Shangri-La Hotel, and the Botanic Gardens--but the Singapore of 1978 is almost completely gone. It lives on in this film, though.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
Moorman
Guest


« #17633 : February 27, 2018, 11:40:43 AM »

Creed (2015)  This was a fantastic entry into the Rocky series. I've been following the director, Ryan Coogler after i read reviews of Creed when it first came out. Decided to go ahead and watch this.  This just might be Slyvestor Stallone's best career performance. I know he was nominated for best supporting actor in this one.  The movie mirrored the original Rocky but gave it a modern spin.  There was nothing cheesy about it, which is a very real risk when adding a movie to a franchise like Rocky. Excellently done.  8 1/2 out of 10...

noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6635


Lonesome Billy


« #17634 : February 27, 2018, 12:38:28 PM »

Creed (2015)  This was a fantastic entry into the Rocky series. I've been following the director, Ryan Coogler after i read reviews of Creed when it first came out. Decided to go ahead and watch this.  This just might be Slyvestor Stallone's best career performance. I know he was nominated for best supporting actor in this one.  The movie mirrored the original Rocky but gave it a modern spin.  There was nothing cheesy about it, which is a very real risk when adding a movie to a franchise like Rocky. Excellently done.  8 1/2 out of 10...

It was pretty well done with a couple of good surprises, but the main flaw of the movie is that none of what happens in it is even remotely interesting to me. I really don't get how a screenplay like this one can be greenlighted. Don't get me wrong: I'm glad it was made, it's rather pretty to look at.


dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16703


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #17635 : February 28, 2018, 05:35:26 AM »

Two with Newman, both from Ross MacDonald books, both released yesterday on blu. The transfers are terrific.

Harper
(1966) – 5/10. Paul Newman is Harper. Harper looks for trouble. See Harper. See Harper look. Look. Harper has a  gun. It shoots straight. See Harper shoot straight. See Harper fight. Harper has many fights. Fight, Harper, fight. See a girl. Girls go for Harper. See girls go. See people. See tricky people. See Harper and the tricky people: Lauren Bacall, Julie Harris, Arthur Hill, Roy Jensen, Janet Leigh, Strother Martin, Pamela Tiffin, Robert Wagner, Robert Webber, Shelley Winters. See also bad 60s lighting, cheap sets, a boring kidnap plot. See the sequel.

The Drowning Pool (1975) – 6/10. An improvement over the first film. The story is a bit better, and the change of venue (New Orleans in for LA) perks things up (although Tony Franciosa’s attempt at a Cajun accent is regrettable). The biggest plus, though, is the substitution of Gordon Willis for Conrad Hall. Hall was a good b&w DP, but he has never been able to do much of interest in color. Willis, coming off Godfather 2 was, at this point, on his way to becoming a legend. And it’s the 70s! Melanie Griffith, fresh off of Night Moves where she played jail bait, is here playing jail bait. What range that girl had!



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14211


easy come easy go


« #17636 : February 28, 2018, 03:59:21 PM »

Two with Newman, both from Ross MacDonald books, both released yesterday on blu. The transfers are terrific.

Harper[/b] (1966) – 5/10. Paul Newman is Harper. Harper looks for trouble. See Harper. See Harper look. Look. Harper has a  gun. It shoots straight. See Harper shoot straight. See Harper fight. Harper has many fights. Fight, Harper, fight. See a girl. Girls go for [/b]Harper. See girls go. See people. See tricky people. See Harper and the tricky people: Lauren Bacall, Julie Harris, Arthur Hill, Roy Jensen, Janet Leigh, Strother Martin, Pamela Tiffin, Robert Wagner, Robert Webber, Shelley Winters. See also bad 60s lighting, cheap sets, a boring kidnap plot. See the sequel.

The Drowning Pool (1975) – 6/10. An improvement over the first film. The story is a bit better, and the change of venue (New Orleans in for LA) perks things up (although Tony Franciosa’s attempt at a Cajun accent is regrettable). The biggest plus, though, is the substitution of Gordon Willis for Conrad Hall. Hall was a good b&w DP, but he has never been able to do much of interest in color. Willis, coming off Godfather 2 was, at this point, on his way to becoming a legend. And it’s the 70s! Melanie Griffith, fresh off of Night Moves where she played jail bait, is here playing jail bait. What range that girl had!


I'd go up a couple of notches for each 6-7/10 for Harper, really like Strother Martin as the quack mystic. 7-8/10 for The Drowning Pool.


"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6635


Lonesome Billy


« #17637 : March 01, 2018, 03:30:56 AM »

PHANTOM THREAD (2017) - 8-8.5/10, it could reach 9/10 with repeated viewings.

Copy paste from my the film's thread:

Quote
THAT WAS AWESOME!

A great and inspiring story about love and hard work. You're 100%: the real star here isn't DDL, it's Vicky Fucking Krieps (and actually most of the numerous women in the film). It features 2 kisses that are in my top 10 movie kisses of all time. I wasn't bored for a second except for the last half and hour, and just as I thought PTA had lost me he totally won me over.

I'm surprised RR says it feels like a fully scored silent movie as well as I'm surprised everybody talks about how the films looks: yes, it looks gorgeous, but that's a given now for post any There Will Be Blood PTA film. The real surprise is how terrific it sounds and the extent sound is used as the main storytelling tool here.


dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16703


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #17638 : March 01, 2018, 05:16:55 AM »

I'd go up a couple of notches for each 6-7/10 for Harper, really like Strother Martin as the quack mystic. 7-8/10 for The Drowning Pool.
Interesting, though, that you agree The Drowning Pool is the better picture. Not everyone feels that way, apparently.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 16703


The joy of loving is to live in a world of Mandom


« #17639 : March 01, 2018, 05:19:03 AM »

Tom Jones (1963) – 7/10. Tony Richardson adapts Fielding, and it’s pretty funny. Criterion offers two cuts of the film, the theatrical release, and the director’s cut, which is 7 minutes shorter (Richardson trimmed scenes he felt went on too long). Neither version looks all that great, either due to production circumstances (it was a Woodfall film) or the lack of proper element preservation (it was a Woodfall film) or both.



"McFilms are commodities and, as such, must be QA'd according to industry standards."
: 1 ... 1174 1175 [1176] 1177 1178 ... 1399  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.033151