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: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  ( 2273136 )
noodles_leone
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« #17745 : April 13, 2018, 10:50:42 AM »

How about watching The Naked City? If CJ and DJ knew you haven't seen that, they'd have harassed you all night long!

It's on the list, along with a lot of CJ's 10/10 noir films.

Side note: a French electronic music composer who was supposed to give (sell) me the right to use one of his songs for a recent commercial of mine and who cancelled from the agreement a single week before the release of the film has a song called Naked City.




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« #17746 : April 14, 2018, 03:35:42 PM »

À nos amours ?/10
So i’m (finally) starting to get rid of my “should have watched them 10 years ago” list, that include some Pialat movies. For years, i had only seen one of his films (nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble), and I was probably 16. I’ve seen Loulou earlier this year.
Like Loulou, this one was quite boring while fascinating from time to time. The amateurish filmmaking and narration is exhausting but i’ve always liked Pialat’s art of the ellipse. The highlights of the movie are the scenes staring the filmmaker as Bonnaire’s father (despite the way he uses himself way too obviously to teach his audience big post 68 life lessons).
I give it a 7/10. Pialat's best is certainly nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble, but his Van Gogh film is very, very good, mostly because it avoids all the clichés.



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« #17747 : April 14, 2018, 05:30:30 PM »

It's on the list, along with a lot of CJ's 10/10 noir films.



Most of those are no better than 7/10  ;)


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« #17748 : April 14, 2018, 06:04:59 PM »

I give it a 7/10. Pialat's best is certainly nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble, but his Van Gogh film is very, very good, mostly because it avoids all the clichés.

I really, really liked nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble when I saw it 10 to 15 years ago. I'll watch it again pretty soon.



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« #17749 : April 16, 2018, 02:32:26 AM »

The Informer (1929): British silent drama/thriller, set within the ranks of the IRA (named the Party here due to British movie censors). It involves a love triangle, betrayal, and misunderstandings/miscommunication... Good movie, where an initial misunderstanding leads to deadly consequences, and people making bad choices upon bad choices. 7/10

Watched the BFI blu-ray which also has the talking version. Great looking restoration, but the new score doesn't really do it for me, it doesn't always follow the narrative/mood all that well.


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« #17750 : April 16, 2018, 09:33:57 AM »

MoMA has a retro going this month called Kazuo Miyagawa: Japan's Greatest Cinematographer. The great thing about this approach is that it allows for showings of films not directed by the big names, pictures no one has ever heard of, let alone seen. I went to one this weekend with my new Japanese bride who kept telling me, "Those subtitles suck." (Yeah, baby, just watch the pretty pictures, wouldja?)

Nishijin no shimai / Sisters of Nishijin (1952) A woman's picture, but also a film about changing social conditions in Japan. A family tries to save a textile company even as the industry about them is dying. They don't make it. Directed by Kozaburo Yoshimura. Screenplay by Kaneto Shindo. With Kinuyo Tanaka, Yumiko Miyagino, Mitsuko Miura, Yuko Tsumura.



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« #17751 : April 16, 2018, 04:30:03 PM »

MoMA has a retro going this month called Kazuo Miyagawa: Japan's Greatest Cinematographer. The great thing about this approach is that it allows for showings of films not directed by the big names, pictures no one has ever heard of, let alone seen. I went to one this weekend with my new Japanese bride who kept telling me, "Those subtitles suck." (Yeah, baby, just watch the pretty pictures, wouldja?)

Nishijin no shimai / Sisters of Nishijin (1952) A woman's picture, but also a film about changing social conditions in Japan. A family tries to save a textile company even as the industry about them is dying. They don't make it. Directed by Kozaburo Yoshimura. Screenplay by Kaneto Shindo. With Kinuyo Tanaka, Yumiko Miyagino, Mitsuko Miura, Yuko Tsumura.

I got a MoMA membership (I was there two weeks ago with my old Hungarian friend, and the ticket line was very long, so I went to the short membership line instead)  :)


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« #17752 : April 16, 2018, 10:58:38 PM »

Some Came Running (1958) 9/10

Performances here all top-notch: Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Shirley MacLaine, Arthur Kennedy, Martha Hyer (the latter 3 were Oscar-nominated).
Shirley MacLaine's character is particularly wonderful: a dumb tramp, who knows she is dumb, but as sweet a person as you can find. It was played to absolute perfection.

SPOILER ALERT

I did not like the ending, I didn't think it was appropriate for the story at all. I am sure that the marriage between Sinatra and MacLaine had no chance of ever working out; he woulda dumped her on her ass within a week, so I guess that in a crude way, her getting killed sort of took care of that for him. But it just didn't feel right, the tone of the film never felt like it was headed for murder, it canme out of nowhere, the movie suddenly does a complete 180 in the last three minutes, and leaves you feeling totally different than you felt for teh first 98% of it, I just didn't like that ending. No, I wasn't hoping for Sinatra and MacLaine to live happily ever after either, I don't think Sinatra was the sorta dude who would find peace that easily; maybe it could have ended with him leaving town alone on a Greyhound bus or something.

Also, something just didn't feel right about Sinatra's scenes with Hyer. Considering the kind of character he is, it just doesn't make sense that after meeting Hyer once, he really loves her, and runs after her in the way that he does, somehow, the scenes between Sinatra and Hyer don't seem to have been written that well.

Those are two criticisms I have of a movie that is otherwise a terrific watch. All the scenes filmed on location, there were just a few process shots during driving (which unfortunately is almost always the case).

Good times  O0

Yiiiiiiikes. I can't believe I gave this movie such a high rating. I just saw it again. I give it a 7/10
The screenplay is a mess. Throws together a bunch of different people and problems, doesn't resolve anything, ugh, just a total mess, the screenwriter has no idea what to do at the end, so make a dumbass ending come out of nowhere. A garbage screenplay, but overall the movie is not a bad watch. Sinatra and Martin are good, nice to look at a real American town in color in the 1950's.


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« #17753 : April 17, 2018, 09:27:16 AM »

Symphonie pour un massacre (1963) 8/10. Partners in a casino are also drug runners, and one of the group (Jean Rochefort) sees an opportunity to rob his friends and remain undetected. Things go according to plan . . . until they don't. Then exciting improvisations begin, but chance remains the great spoiler. This neatly plotted crime film would surely delight Tarantino. Charles Vanel has a role, and there is even a brief appearance by Jose Giovanni (who also helped write the screenplay's dialog). We have here yet another French classic unknown to that Phony Phrenchman, noodles_leone.



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« #17754 : April 17, 2018, 09:47:26 AM »

I’ve seen a good chunk of it on TV a couple of years ago. I stopped it because I had missed the beginning. Young Jean Rochefort is always a weird experience: some people look like they were born old and never aged.



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« #17755 : April 17, 2018, 10:55:25 AM »

MoMA has a retro going this month called Kazuo Miyagawa: Japan's Greatest Cinematographer.

That is tempting enough to make me undertake the 4 hour drive to get there if I could only spare the time.

I wish Kurosawa had been able to work with him more across his career.

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« #17756 : April 17, 2018, 09:33:58 PM »

King and Country (1964) 7.5/10


Great performance by Tom Courtenay (won Best Actor at Venice Film Festival) as a British soldier court-martialed for desertion during World War I, and a very solid performance by Dirk Bogarde, the officer appointed to defend him.

There is a review here http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/King-and-Country-Blu-ray/92192/#Review which specifically focuses on the comparisons to Paths of Glory. This is like a dirtier version of PoG.

Unfortunately, I did not see it on blu-ray, but on a crappy pan-and-scan dvd.

The production design of this black/white film is a triumph. War has never been dirtier. It all takes place in disgusting ramshackle facilities, with leaky roofs and mud and rats and shit.

« : April 18, 2018, 04:26:42 PM drinkanddestroy »

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« #17757 : April 18, 2018, 07:59:16 AM »

Le dernier des six / The Last One of the Six (1941) - 7/10. A tontine is the occasion for several murders, but Superintendent Wens (Pierre Fresnay) is on the case. This very witty prequel to The Murderer Lives at 21 was not directed by Clouzot, he only wrote the screenplay adaptation. But once one has understood the plot, the only reason to return to the film is for the byplay between the characters. There are several hilarious exchanges.

« : April 19, 2018, 08:40:24 AM dave jenkins »


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« #17758 : April 19, 2018, 01:23:25 AM »

Disclaimer: take the following grading and review with a grain of salt: I always change the original grade of a Wes Anderson movie after the second or third viewing.

Isle of Dogs (2018) - 7?/10

Isle of Dogs is your usual cool and arty yet boring yet funny yet touching Wes Anderson flick. Top notch cast (Bryan Cranston proves once again he was the most underrated actor ever for decades), as often. Desplat's music is effective and carries the film's pace but fails at providing the additional magic touch required. The sound design makes up for it. All of this was expected.

What took me by surprise is how absolutely gorgeous the film is. I'm your regular Parisian arty film-goer so of course I've always liked Wes Anderson's aesthetics but I've never loved them. This time, I'm in total awe. Everything from the set and character design to the careful framing to the use of typography is sumptuous. The compositions during the numerous scenes of dialogues between dogs are masterful, inspiring and damn beautiful. Wes Anderson may be known for his live action work, but his style only really flourishes in stop motion. I also thing that dirt and grit add what his work usually lacks. Another thing I didn't expect is the often fast pacing of the movie. The beginning has something of a Scorsese flare. However (less than usual) vintage and desuet the film tries to be, it sometimes results in very modern sequences.

Also, don't expect any insight on Japanese culture. The film's Japan is a total imaginary country and only serves 2 purposes: looking good (and it sure does) and highlighting problems of communication between two groups. The only exception to this rule is the sushi scene, praised as pretty on the spot. That scene is cool as fuck.

I'll see it again.

« : April 19, 2018, 07:52:45 AM noodles_leone »


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« #17759 : April 19, 2018, 05:33:09 AM »

Disclaimer: take the following grading and review with a grain of salt: I always change the original grade of a Wes Anderson movie after the second or third viewing.

Isle of Dogs (2018) - 7?/10

Isle of Dogs is your usual cool and arty yet boring yet funny yet touching Wes Anderson flick. Top notch cast (Bryan Cranston proves once again he was the most underrated actor ever for decades), as often. Desplat's music is effective and carries the film's pace but fail at providing the additional magic touch required. The sound design makes up for it. All of this was expected.

What took me by surprise is how absolutely gorgeous the film is. I'm your regular Parisian arty film-goer so of course I've always liked Wes Anderson's aesthetics but I've never loved it. This time, I'm in total awe. Everything from the set and character design to the careful framing to the use of typography is sumptuous. The compositions during the numerous scenes of dialogues between dogs is masterful, inspiring and damn beautiful. Wes Anderson may be known for his live action work, but his style only really flourish in stop motion. I also thing that dirt and grit add what his work usually lacks. Another thing I didn't expect is the often fast pacing of the movie. The beginning has something of a Scorsese flare. However (less than usual) vintage and desuet the film tries to be, it sometimes results in very modern sequences.

Also, don't expect any insight on Japanese culture. The film's Japan is a total imaginary country and only serves 2 purposes: looking good (and it sure does) and highlighting problems of communication between two groups. The only exception to this rule is the sushi scene, praised as pretty on the spot. That scene is cool as fuck.

I'll see it again.
Yeah that’s pretty much my exact score and review as well.

I am still a bit bothered by the obnoxiousness is his style and I think it’s what prevents me from loving any of his films. That being said it’s objectively amazing, so good for him and all those who love it.

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