Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
March 30, 2020, 05:44:41 AM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 and 7 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 ... 1255 1256 [1257] 1258 1259 ... 1263
: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  ( 2999794 )
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5813


Lonesome Billy


« #18840 : February 23, 2020, 08:48:36 AM »

I don't recommend this film.  Sandler is very good, his character and his behaviors are terrible.

Haha are you judging the film based on the moral qualities (or lack of) of its main character?


T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2031



« #18841 : February 23, 2020, 02:58:28 PM »

Suicide Kings (1997) - A good bad movie with a swiss cheese plot that tries too hard to be Tarantino-esque. Visually, it's very dated and relies on way too many boring medium close ups with some really badly shot sequences like a softcore porn slo-mo pan of a car parked in the rain. With that said, it is entertaining and I have a soft spot for these failed try-hard QT inspired 90s movies. C-

Bonnie & Clyde - approx. 5th viewing - still a good movie but less enjoyable with subsequent viewings
i don't think time has been very kind to it and critics and audiences crowned the wrong movie released in August of '67 (Point Blank).

« : February 23, 2020, 03:11:43 PM T.H. »


Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9220

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #18842 : February 23, 2020, 03:04:42 PM »

Haha are you judging the film based on the moral qualities (or lack of) of its main character?

some people feel you have to like or relate to the main character in some way in order to enjoy a movie.

To me, there's a difference if it's presented as a "realistic" movie or not. If it's a "movie" you can like the bad guy, but when it is made in a more realistic style - feels less like Hollywood's "dream factory" - then it is hard to root for a bad guy.


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5813


Lonesome Billy


« #18843 : February 24, 2020, 03:33:34 AM »

some people feel you have to like or relate to the main character in some way in order to enjoy a movie.

Yeah it's one of the greatest plagues of mainstream movies/TV shows. History of cinema consistently demonstrated that neither the success nor the quality of a movie has anything to do with the fact that the audience would befriend the main character in real life AND YET producers are killing project after project by feeding us "good guys with no flaw but also... no personality, wow, where did that come from? Who saw that coming? Do we know absolutely nothing about CHARACTERS?". By doing so, they are actually brainwashing the audience to expect this garbage.

To be fair I'm not saying Cusser is brainwashed, I think the right word is that he needs to "respect" at least one side of the main character to be ready to spend 2 hours with him.


stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3273



« #18844 : February 24, 2020, 05:02:36 AM »



I'm gonna tell it once again: you may think whatever you want, he was objectively one of the best, and cinema history already chose its side (it chose Mr Siegel's side on this one).
(I'd say even Malick owes a lot to the trend/school his editing style started, but this is a little theory of mine I'm still working on)

Now, among the greatest, he is also probably the most flawed one. Maybe because he... drank and destroyed?

Btw, who else apart from Sam and Sergio are the greatest iyo?


noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5813


Lonesome Billy


« #18845 : February 24, 2020, 06:40:29 AM »

I'm gonna forget several of them, but here is a list in no particular order:

Martin Scorsese
Steven Spielberg
Alfred Hitchcock
David Fincher
Stanley Kubrick
Terrence Malick
Alfonso Cuaron
Orson Welles (who actually made movies with more flaws than the most flawed films by Sam Peckinpah)
Francis Ford Coppola
Frederico Fellini (who wasn't a stranger to flawed movies either, but he kind of based his art on its own flaws so it's different)

Also, as time goes by, it seems more and more plausible that Abdellatif Kechiche will be considered as one of the greatest by most film academics.


« : February 24, 2020, 06:42:27 AM noodles_leone »

drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9220

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #18846 : February 24, 2020, 08:15:29 AM »

I'm gonna forget several of them, but here is a list in no particular order:

Martin Scorsese
Steven Spielberg
Alfred Hitchcock
David Fincher
Stanley Kubrick
Terrence Malick
Alfonso Cuaron
Orson Welles (who actually made movies with more flaws than the most flawed films by Sam Peckinpah)
Francis Ford Coppola
Frederico Fellini (who wasn't a stranger to flawed movies either, but he kind of based his art on its own flaws so it's different)

Also, as time goes by, it seems more and more plausible that Abdellatif Kechiche will be considered as one of the greatest by most film academics.

Not John Ford?


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14717

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #18847 : February 24, 2020, 08:16:29 AM »

I'm gonna forget several of them, but here is a list in no particular order:

Martin Scorsese
Steven Spielberg
Alfred Hitchcock
David Fincher
Stanley Kubrick
Terrence Malick
Alfonso Cuaron
Orson Welles (who actually made movies with more flaws than the most flawed films by Sam Peckinpah)
Francis Ford Coppola
Frederico Fellini (who wasn't a stranger to flawed movies either, but he kind of based his art on its own flaws so it's different)

Also, as time goes by, it seems more and more plausible that Abdellatif Kechiche will be considered as one of the greatest by most film academics.
Not a single Frenchie amongst 'em. Self-hatred is a terrible condition, n_l.



Ya measly skunk! A-campin’ on my trail and lettin’ me do the work an’ then shootin’ me in the back. IN THE BACK!
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5813


Lonesome Billy


« #18848 : February 24, 2020, 08:49:06 AM »

Not a single Frenchie amongst 'em. Self-hatred is a terrible condition, n_l.

Abdellatif Kechiche is French.
I do think there are/were several great french filmmakers. They just aren't among the greatest (although of course Godard probably deserves a spot, at least in the top 3, but hey, I still didn't "get it"): Renoir, Melville, Truffaut...

Not John Ford?

I've been convinced by scholars that he is one of the greatest but I need to revisit his films to feel it for myself. The ones I've rewatched in the past few years rubbed me the right way (The Searchers, Cheyenne Autumn, Stagecoach)

« : February 24, 2020, 08:52:11 AM noodles_leone »

stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3273



« #18849 : February 24, 2020, 10:53:53 AM »

I'm gonna forget several of them, but here is a list in no particular order:

Martin Scorsese
Steven Spielberg
Alfred Hitchcock
David Fincher
Stanley Kubrick
Terrence Malick
Alfonso Cuaron
Orson Welles (who actually made movies with more flaws than the most flawed films by Sam Peckinpah)
Francis Ford Coppola
Frederico Fellini (who wasn't a stranger to flawed movies either, but he kind of based his art on its own flaws so it's different)


Ok, quite interesting, I like them all very much, apart from Spielberg.
But there are more, several others, who had a time when they made a string of excellent films. Hmm .... Lynch, Lubitsch, Ophüls, Wenders, Chan Wook, Almodovar, Medem, Tykwer, Melville, Noe, Rohmer, Kieslowski, Tarantino, Penn, Keaton...


Spielberg is (or was) an excellent director, but in the end he ruins all his films a bit by sentimentality or childishness. Commercial compromises, which made him highly successful, but I think none of his films goes beyond 8/10.


T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2031



« #18850 : February 24, 2020, 11:05:56 AM »

Love and a .45 (1994) - Apparently QT's favorite of all the 90's rip-offs but it can stand on its own within the 'lovers on the run' subgenre. It's well paced and entertaining with a pretty good cast where Rory Cochrane and Jeffrey Combs stand out. If you're wondering why Renee Zellweger was ever a thing, this would be the explanation. She's really good here. Recommended. B-


2 Days in the Valley (1996) - This had to be sold/greenlit as Pulp Fiction meets Short Cuts and while this badly misses its intended target, it's still an interesting and entertaining miss with a mostly solid ensemble cast. The plot is goofy and illogical at many points but I would recommend this to anyone that enjoys the Altman Nashville type of movie - just keep the expectations low. C+


I'm gonna forget several of them, but here is a list in no particular order:

Martin Scorsese
Steven Spielberg
Alfred Hitchcock
David Fincher
Stanley Kubrick
Terrence Malick
Alfonso Cuaron

Orson Welles (who actually made movies with more flaws than the most flawed films by Sam Peckinpah)
Francis Ford Coppola
Frederico Fellini (who wasn't a stranger to flawed movies either, but he kind of based his art on its own flaws so it's different)

Also, as time goes by, it seems more and more plausible that Abdellatif Kechiche will be considered as one of the greatest by most film academics.

Relatively close to a list of greats I would make if I tried to be as objective as possible. Ford, Hawks, Kurosawa, Peckinpah, Michael Mann, Melville and Wilder would definitely make it, even if Wilder wasn't a top tier visual artist. Probably Tarantino as well even if he retired after Jackie Brown.

As for my heart: Carpenter, Suzuki, Budd, Woo, Delmer Daves, Sturges, De Palma, Fuller, Nick Ray, Walter Hill and Fukasaku.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
Cusser
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1741


Remember, I always see the job through !


« #18851 : February 24, 2020, 04:04:44 PM »

The Young Lions (1958) Pretty good; story of three reluctant soldiers (two from NY and one German) in WW2.  Besides Brando, Dean Martin, and Montgomery Clift, had than Van Cleef guy.

« : February 25, 2020, 07:57:43 AM Cusser »
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2031



« #18852 : February 25, 2020, 02:44:36 PM »

Truth or Consequences, N.M. (1997) - Another good bad Tarantino wannabe from the 90's. An uproxx article described this movie (paraphrasing) as a decent cover band doing Tarantino's greatest hits and it's pretty damn spot on.  Kiefer Sutherland stars and directs and while his performance is solid, someone like Madsen would have done a much better job playing a psycho. This is certainly flawed, and dated visually, but the ensemble cast is mostly impressive outside of Martin Sheen, who was comically miscast as the antagonist. C


Macon County Line (1974) - It starts off as some kind of light-hearted, redneck crime adventure romp but it reveals itself to be a very slow burning thriller that keeps up a nice pace. It's shot in a docudrama type of style with some beautiful visuals and a 16mm look. Currently streaming on Tubi with a solid transfer. B-

« : February 25, 2020, 02:48:01 PM T.H. »


Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
PowerRR
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3269



« #18853 : February 26, 2020, 01:55:50 PM »

As for my heart: Carpenter
If his subject matter was a bit more "high-brow" I think he'd be more considered as one of the great auteurs. He's one of the few filmmakers where every frame really feels like a John Carpenter movie. Every single movie besides his first (Dark Star) and last (The Ward) has hit unique touch, that's immediately recognizable but hard to define.

T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2031



« #18854 : February 26, 2020, 03:10:17 PM »

If his subject matter was a bit more "high-brow" I think he'd be more considered as one of the great auteurs. He's one of the few filmmakers where every frame really feels like a John Carpenter movie. Every single movie besides his first (Dark Star) and last (The Ward) has hit unique touch, that's immediately recognizable but hard to define.
I wonder how much Carpenter is in Starman and the Elvis movie - it's been a long time since I've seen either, but I agree with your theory assuming we're not including Memoirs of an Invisible Man (1992). I've seen bits of that years and years ago but I don't think it has any Carpenter elements. I think genre filmmakers mostly get ignored unless they're a Leone, Peckinpah or Tarantino type that transcend their genre(s) in their best work whereas a Walter Hill or Carpenter (and Don Siegel etc before them) color inside the lines, and beautifully so, in my opinion.



Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre..
: 1 ... 1255 1256 [1257] 1258 1259 ... 1263  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.046161