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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1840694 times)
Sanjuro
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« Reply #75 on: February 04, 2007, 01:22:00 PM »

Yep, a film only gets a 10 if it's top 25 material. This is like... top 40 material. Might be upgraded to a 10 with repeat viewings.

See it 5 times more.

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« Reply #76 on: February 04, 2007, 03:12:16 PM »

After all these years, I've finally gotten around to seeing the 900-pound gorilla of American cinema that is "Citizen Kane".  I don't have any truly insightful comments, it was an excellent movie although, like "Casablanca" and other 40's films, I found it somewhat distant.  Orson Welles was excellent and the whole cast did fine work.  And it was an interesting film above all else, if a little pressed for time.  However, I certainly enjoyed it and no doubt it deserves its place in cinematic history.

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« Reply #77 on: February 04, 2007, 04:38:47 PM »

The Departed: 5 out of 5

[Pi]: 3.5 out of 5

Requiem For A Dream: 5 out of 5

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« Reply #78 on: February 04, 2007, 05:55:20 PM »

Pan's Labyrinth = 96%
Letters From Iwo Jima = 94%

Now, for a review of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.

If you've never heard of this little gem, than you are definitely missing out. It stars Hugo Weaving (V for Vendetta, Agent Smith from The Matrix) and Guy Pearce (Memento) as a cross-dressing duo who team up with a transexual (Terrence Stamp) to travel across the outback in their bus Priscilla to get to the location of their new cabaret gig. Making many friends and enemies along the way.

It's extremely well made, and has a nice plot and message to it. The plot seems a bit contrived, but it takes itself surprisingly serious. Even if it doesn't sound interesting, it's worth the rental just to see Hugo Weaving and Guy Pearce in drag, and they do some excellent acting.

90%

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« Reply #79 on: February 04, 2007, 07:00:13 PM »

English Patient--5/5

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« Reply #80 on: February 06, 2007, 06:15:07 AM »

You Can't Take It With You

The penultimate film from the Premiere Frank Capra Collection DVD boxset released by Sony, You Can't Take It With You is based on the Pulitzer Prize Winning play of the same title. It concerns it's self with a family of people living in New York who are led by the irrascible Grandpa (Lionel Barrymore) whose moto is do whatever you want. After recruiting a bored clark out of an estate agents to live in his house things seem to be going well. The his grandaughter (The ever beautiful and wonderful voiced Jean Arthur) falls in love with AJ Kirby (Jimmy Stewart in one of his earliest roles, on loan from paramount.) However she doesn't come up to the standards of AJ's family the money barons THE Kirbys. After hilarious dinner mixups and an arrest the familys seem more split then ever. It doesn't help either that Grandpa's house is in the way of Mr Kirby completing his biggest deal ever...
   This film is full of wonderful touches, from the joy of the clark realising he can escape from a job he hates to making childhood gadgets, to the beautiful and not overly sickly romance striking up between Jimmy and Jean. Capra seems to play this as a stage play, certain camera angles and movements throughout the film seem to hold the film up as if it was being performed on stage. This film feels slower then Capra's previous successes but not so it crawls and in the end it has one of the most uplifting films I've seen since, well Mr Deeds.

LA's Score 4 out of 5

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« Reply #81 on: February 06, 2007, 11:56:50 AM »

The Sixties: The Years That Shaped a Generation
documentary about the counter-culture decade

this documentary claims to be about the sixties, but it skips all the way up to '68 within 20-30 mins and stays there for over an hour. it covers all sorts of big events like vietnam war, the protests, the shooting of mlk jr. and a lot of the hippie culture. is it politically biased? perhaps. but I still enjoyed a slice of the sixties even with it's narrow focus on the end of the era.




amistad
a bunch of slaves kill their captors and commands the ship they're on to sail to who knows where. they end up somewhere in the united states and legal action ensues with various factions claiming ownership of the slaves.

I have developed a serious distaste for courtroom dramas and this movie didn't change that. as pompous as anything historical hollywood has pumped out, this is just too much to try to take seriously. I was not surprised to see spielberg's name when the movie ended. it has some decent acting in it though.


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« Reply #82 on: February 06, 2007, 04:12:59 PM »

Treasure of the Sierra Madre - 9/10.

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« Reply #83 on: February 06, 2007, 07:46:04 PM »

Mr Smith Goes To Washington

Wow, Capra's best movie in my opinion. Taking his excellent use of comedy and drama into the walls of the senate this film keeps you in stitches, tears and suspense. Jimmy Stewart plays Jeff Smith an idealistic young man who is elected senator to cover up the shady dealings of Senator Payne (Claude Raines, you always know its going to be a great movie when his name appears in the credits.). Guided around by his reluctant secretary (Jean Arthur, I think I'm in love...) he finds his naivety is not welcome in the capital as he becomes used and abused by those around him.
    From the early scenes of Smith walking around the great monuments of Washington to the hoarsed voice finale the film keeps you raptured with its great mix of emotions. As often with Capra's movies the hero has to go through hell to get to the right. Stewarts performance is top notch and Jean Arthur plays lovingly as the ice queen who melts.
     I have enjoyed all 5 films in the Capra set but tellingly this is my favourite of the lot and so much so that it has manged to make it into my top 20. I recomend it to all.

LA's Score 5 out of 5

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« Reply #84 on: February 06, 2007, 09:31:04 PM »

I was glued to the television set for the past two hours while I watched Ozu's awesome TOKYO STORY. It's a prime example that a film doesn't necessarily need a whole lot of goings-on or action to keep you interested throughout. I didn't think there was one boring moment in this, actually. It's about an elderly couple who travel to Tokyo to meet their children and grandchildren, but are initially received with cold dismissal. Their children even send them to a day-spa in an attempt to get them out of their hair. The only person who actually appreciates their presence is their daughter-in-law, who was married to their son, who died in the war 8 years earlier. I won't spoil the plot any more. I'll just say that this is a fascinating film not to be missed.

9/10

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« Reply #85 on: February 06, 2007, 09:44:49 PM »

Hard Boiled

5 out of 5

Probably 2 out of 3 on my Top Action Movies.

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« Reply #86 on: February 08, 2007, 07:58:27 PM »

Harvey

Having seen this film in excerpts and truncated forms over the years I was very glad to sit down and watching this delightful film. I think everyone knows the story about the man and the 6 foot rabbit but I found this such a heart warming tale, not sentimental enough to make me feel ill (unlike ET where I seem to fall into a minority of people who can't stand that film). And yes, I think that darned white rabbit has had an effect on me.

LA's Score 5 out 5

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« Reply #87 on: February 08, 2007, 11:22:22 PM »

I was glued to the television set for the past two hours while I watched Ozu's awesome TOKYO STORY. It's a prime example that a film doesn't necessarily need a whole lot of goings-on or action to keep you interested throughout. I didn't think there was one boring moment in this, actually. It's about an elderly couple who travel to Tokyo to meet their children and grandchildren, but are initially received with cold dismissal. Their children even send them to a day-spa in an attempt to get them out of their hair. The only person who actually appreciates their presence is their daughter-in-law, who was married to their son, who died in the war 8 years earlier. I won't spoil the plot any more. I'll just say that this is a fascinating film not to be missed.

9/10

I'm glad you enjoyed this masterpiece by great Yasujiro Ozu. I'd like to congraturate you especially because you are really developing your taste for the subtle pathos of life portrayed in this type of film at your age. If you see more of Ozu films, you can tell his distinctive style of storytelling. Also, you will be surprised at his great sense of humor when he directed children.

You liked this masterpiece so much and you only give 9 out of 10?
 

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« Reply #88 on: February 09, 2007, 08:24:41 AM »

Why not? It's not his best film. Save those 10s for Banshun and Bakushu and The Flavor of Mackeral.

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« Reply #89 on: February 09, 2007, 08:43:13 AM »

After all these years, I've finally gotten around to seeing the 900-pound gorilla of American cinema that is "Citizen Kane".  I don't have any truly insightful comments, it was an excellent movie although, like "Casablanca" and other 40's films, I found it somewhat distant.  Orson Welles was excellent and the whole cast did fine work.  And it was an interesting film above all else, if a little pressed for time.  However, I certainly enjoyed it and no doubt it deserves its place in cinematic history.
Jeez, Groggy, talk about damning with faint praise. Any 900-pound gorilla worth his bananas deserves more than this. And so:

Much has been written about this film, but nothing has improved on the review written by Jorge Luis Borges the year Citizen Kane was released.

Quote
A kind of metaphysical detective story, its subject (both psychological and allegorical) is the investigation of a man’s inner self, through the works he has wrought, the words he has spoken, the many lives he has ruined. The same technique was used by Joseph Conrad in Chance (1914) and in that beautiful film The Power and the Glory: a rhapsody of miscellaneous scenes without chronological order. Overwhelmingly, endlessly, Orson Welles shows fragments of the life of the man, Charles Foster Kane, and invites us to combine them and to reconstruct him. Forms of multiplicity and incongruity abound in the film: the first scenes record the treasures amassed by Kane; in one of the last, a poor woman, luxuriant and suffering, plays with an enormous jigsaw puzzle on the floor of a palace that is also a museum. At the end we realize that the fragments are not governed by any secret unity: the detested Charles Foster Kane is a simulacrum, a chaos of appearances. (A possible corollary, foreseen by David Hume, Ernst Mach, and our own Macedonio Ferenandez: no man knows who he is, no man is anyone.) In a story by Chesterton—“The Head of Caesar,” I think—the hero observes that nothing is so frightening as a labyrinth with no center. This film is precisely that labyrinth.

As good as this is, it can stand a bit of tweaking.

Borges needlessly muddies the water with his citations of Hume et al. If “no man is anyone” then there seems to have been no particular reason to make Kane the subject of the film. Any sort of person would have done as well: tinker, tailor, lampshade maker. But surely the point of using Kane was to demonstrate a rich irony: this person most present in his society is, in private life, a complete nullity. Further, we, the audience, best appreciate this irony when able to contrast Kane with others, those who, like ourselves, may not exist as flamboyantly, but who in fact lead incomparably richer lives.

Taking the above caveat into account, Borges’s interpretation of the puzzle montage is substantially correct. Not all men, but Kane in particular is “a chaos of appearances.” Not the film Citizen Kane, but the man Charles Foster Kane is “a labyrinth with no center.” (Borges’s own logic eludes him. If nothing is as frightening as a labyrinth without a center, and this film is such a labyrinth, cinema-goers would run screaming out of every showing.) Citizen Kane, then, does have a center: the revelation concerning Kane’s true (lack of) character.

Thus the film’s technique of fragmentation is the ideal exposition of its theme: Charles Foster Kane, though of many parts, is less than their sum. Such an approach works well for a despised character, but would not do as well for other biographies, a life of Lincoln, for example, or the story of Christ.

This limitation shows up the film’s one great weakness: its central character, we come to learn, is not worth our time. This is worth knowing, of course, but having once learned it, what need have we to return to the character? In fact, students of the film never do. Citizen Kane is today appreciated almost entirely for its formal qualities (which are considerable).

No, we expect more from our masterpieces: grand characters. When we survey the characters of the Western narrative tradition who continue to command our attention, we encounter nothing but great souls: Achilles, Medea, Orlando, Lear. It is not a question of heroes or villains—Macbeth exhibits greatness every bit as much as Henry V does.  Charles Foster Kane, on the other hand, is neither hero nor villain. He’s not even a complete human being, and a non-entity is not, ultimately, a fit subject for contemplation—there is nothing to contemplate.

It is a hard judgment on a work of art that, rather than failing to accomplish its purpose, has succeeded too well. But there it is.

Consider the ironic title, which invites ridicule upon its subject. This is a very different title compared to, say, Oedipus Rex, which, free of irony, informs us that Oedipus remains kingly even as he falls.

And so, Citizen Kane cannot be the greatest film of all time, not even the greatest American film of all time. It was, however, the best American film in the year of its production and should have won the Best Picture Oscar for 1941.

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