Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 23, 2017, 10:10:01 PM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 4 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 299 300 [301] 302 303 ... 1162 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1770352 times)
Kurug3n
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1687


Que pasa?


View Profile
« Reply #4500 on: October 11, 2008, 10:43:01 PM »

Elephant

Logged
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4501 on: October 12, 2008, 08:07:23 AM »


Her looks remind me of a twelve year old boy.

Her acting chops aren't much to speak of either... she seems soulless in everything she's been in after Leon.

Wrong on both counts. Perhaps if you're judging Natalie by this movie and Star Wars, you'd be correct. Although in the case of the latter, I'd have to say I at least appreciated Padme's revealing outfits. Wink

« Last Edit: October 12, 2008, 08:28:08 AM by Groggy » Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13637

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #4502 on: October 12, 2008, 08:09:12 AM »

About the 12 year old boy... well, let it go at that, uh?
I dunno. I saw The Duchess recently, and Keira Knightley came off (not for the first time) as a young guy in drag . . . is there some kind of conspiracy here?

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4503 on: October 12, 2008, 08:12:18 AM »

Keira Knightley is another issue entirely... Undecided

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1767



View Profile
« Reply #4504 on: October 12, 2008, 08:53:01 AM »

Of course, it's not a very good thriller, but bad thrillers are part of the filmgoing experience, and everyone is entitled to their fair share. If Welles had worried more about the script than the compositions and editing, he might have produced a better product. As it is, the opening crane work is still impressive (even after having been endlessly copied) and the final sequence, demonstrating what The Man From Radio can do in a sound film, provides a great deal of pleasure. But all that comes in between (especially Dennis Weaver and the motel) is just tedious.  Of course, don't tell this to the WOODies (Worshipers of Orson's Dung), everything the man did, according to them, was genius . . .

I'll give you Dennis Weaver's role and the motel scenes in general, they are a bit overlong. Those are the only shortcomings I see in the restored cut, which I've seen quite a few times. I have never watched the pre-98 versions and maybe that's the reason why I find your criticisms to be lacking. Your gripes seem more personal: can you not judge the movie for what it is instead of what was left out?

The compositions and editing have precedence over the plot, which in my mind, was Welles' clear intention. The only B&W movie that matches TOE's beauty imo is Soy Cuba, which I assume was influenced greatly by this work. The fatal flaw in your argument is that TOE shouldn't be soley judged as a thriller. You're completely dismissing the film's stylistic beauty and atmosphere, which is the contributing factor for its lofty reputation. In many ways, TOE shares more similarities to the American western in terms of its relatively simple plot than the Chandler, Hamlett detective fiction novels. Seems like the Sergio Leone fans perfect noir.

« Last Edit: October 12, 2008, 11:45:18 AM by Tuco Harmonica » Logged


Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre. What did you think of the script?
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13637

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #4505 on: October 12, 2008, 10:02:32 AM »

Criterion has provided me this weekend with a Melville crime film double feature:

Le Doulos (1962) - 9/10
Le Deuxieme Souffle (1966) - 8/10

Le Doulos is a stunner. In one early sequence, a couple of burglars scale the wall of an estate and take the elderly caretaker--and his yappy dog--prisoner. They quickly move indoors to the safe, bumping a small table as they pass. This nearly upsets an expensive-looking vase, but one of the men saves it with a quick-thinking juggle and returns it to its place. With the dog in another room, and the old guy with his head covered, face to the wall, the safecracker begins to drill. The extra man, not needed for this, goes into the front room and starts shuttering windows and turning off lights. That done, he steps outside to listen to the sounds coming from the house: the electric drill and the yappy dog are audible, but only just. The man walks out the front gate and studies the neighborhood. He looks down the street to the right: it's empty. He looks left: it's clear that way too. For the heck of it, he looks right again: two headlights suddenly appear in the distance. The car stops, at the absolute limit of the horizontal plane, almost at the point of imperceptibility, and two guys get out and run out of view. WTF? The burglar looks back left, and the same thing happens there: a car screeches to a halt, guys get out and run off. That's when the character, and the audience, realize together that the burglars have been traduced. The man runs inside to warn his companion: leave the tools, it's time to go. They tear out of the building, hitting that damn table one more time. The vase tips, slides right . . . for a second it looks certain to sail off onto the floor . . . but it holds! And that's the film in microcosm: a collection of elaborate set pieces that, as they unfold, seem sure to collapse at any moment, but miraculously do not. And even more wonderfully: each of the pieces slides into place to form an even more intricate and immaculate whole.

The plot of the film turns on that scene. Who was responsible for tipping the police to the heist? The evidence points to Silien (Jean-Paul Belmondo), whom we see doing some very suspicious things before and after the event. But Melville witholds a lot of information, so it is quite a while before all actions are explained, all motivations revealed. The effect, then, is to fashion a gangster drama that resembles a classic whodunit, but with plenty of gangland cool ladled on top. Some of the gesturing could be considered risible, none moreso than Belmondo's final flourish, but I, by that point, was prepared to forgive just about anything.  Melville is so in command of his medium that he presents one 8-minute-plus interrogation scene in a single take, but does so so adroitly, that you almost don't notice what he's done (though he tips his hand with one 360 degree pan). This is doubtless thrown away on most first-time viewers, but the film is so cinematically rich, Melville can afford to be profligate with his conceits. Naturally, the film is a trove that has been much plundered: the hat motif was stolen by the Coens for Miller's Crossing, the opening of Jackie Brown pays homage to the superior title sequence of Le Doulos. And did I mention the cool jazz score by Paul Misraki, a wonderful counterpoint to many despicable acts? I do have to shave a point, however, for some bad process work in a couple scenes. I don't know why Melville had such a hard time with rear projection.

Le Deuxieme Souffle is also an excellent, though more straightforward, gangster film, this time with Lino Ventura in the lead. It's just not Le Doulos, and so, must be rated lower.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13637

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #4506 on: October 12, 2008, 10:10:54 AM »

The compositions and editing have precedence over the plot, which in my mind, was Welle's clear intention. The only B&W movie that matches TOE's beauty imo is Soy Cuba, which I assume was influenced greatly by this work. The fatal flaw in your argument is that TOE shouldn't be soley judged as a thriller.
This is where we disagree. Narrative above all else. Welles needed a story worthy of his visuals; visuals instead of story will never wash with me.

« Last Edit: October 12, 2008, 10:15:37 AM by dave jenkins » Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
PowerRR
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3000


View Profile
« Reply #4507 on: October 12, 2008, 10:43:32 AM »

Elephant
Awful, awful, awful, AWFUL movie. Ugh. Horrendously bad.

Logged
The Firecracker
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9672


Rub me the wrong way, and I'll go off in your face


View Profile
« Reply #4508 on: October 12, 2008, 11:05:22 AM »

Wrong on both counts. Perhaps if you're judging Natalie by this movie and Star Wars, you'd be correct.

I've seen Natalie in a lot more than just Star Wars. Leon was the only role where she shows signs of life (I'll be fair, she was very good in it). The only time she came close to acting after that was Closer. Everything else I've seen her in she is void of any feeling.
As far as her looks go she is in the same league as Keira Knightly. Flat as a board and a boyish face. At least Knightly has a sexy accent to offer us.


Although in the case of the latter, I'd have to say I at least appreciated Padme's revealing outfits. Wink

There wasn't much to reveal.





Logged



The Official COMIN' AT YA! re-release site
http://cominatyanoir3d.com/
Whalestoe
Guest
« Reply #4509 on: October 12, 2008, 11:08:25 AM »

I've seen Natalie in a lot more than just Star Wars. Leon was the only role where she shows signs of life (I'll be fair, she was very good in it). The only time she came close to acting after that was Closer. Everything else I've seen her in she is void of any feeling.
As far as her looks go she is in the same league as Keira Knightly. Flat as a board and a boyish face. At least Knightly has a sexy accent to offer us.


There wasn't much to reveal.






Darjeeling Limited, Darjeeling Limited, Darjeeling Limited, Darjeeling Limited, Darjeeling Limited, and Darjeeling Limited. Her ass. Yes please.

Logged
The Firecracker
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9672


Rub me the wrong way, and I'll go off in your face


View Profile
« Reply #4510 on: October 12, 2008, 11:09:49 AM »

Darjeeling Limited, Darjeeling Limited, Darjeeling Limited, Darjeeling Limited, Darjeeling Limited, and Darjeeling Limited. Her ass. Yes please.


Doesn't she show her ass in a short film by Anderson? NOT his feature Darjeeling Limited?

Logged



The Official COMIN' AT YA! re-release site
http://cominatyanoir3d.com/
Whalestoe
Guest
« Reply #4511 on: October 12, 2008, 11:10:55 AM »


Doesn't she show her ass in a short film by Anderson? NOT his feature Darjeeling Limited?

The short film is shown on the opening of the DVD.

Logged
The Firecracker
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9672


Rub me the wrong way, and I'll go off in your face


View Profile
« Reply #4512 on: October 12, 2008, 11:12:10 AM »

The short film is shown on the opening of the DVD.

http://www.celebritymoviearchive.com/tour/movie.php/19660



Okay, she has a nice rump but that lesbo haircut has to go.

Logged



The Official COMIN' AT YA! re-release site
http://cominatyanoir3d.com/
Kurug3n
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1687


Que pasa?


View Profile
« Reply #4513 on: October 12, 2008, 12:31:42 PM »

Awful, awful, awful, AWFUL movie. Ugh. Horrendously bad.

I didnt think it was horrible.It was alright.

Logged
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1767



View Profile
« Reply #4514 on: October 12, 2008, 01:01:10 PM »

This is where we disagree. Narrative above all else. Welles needed a story worthy of his visuals; visuals instead of story will never wash with me.

Fair enough, but I don't think the plot is nearly as awful as you claim. I also don't think it's necessarily fair to view the visuals and plot as separate entities due to how much TOE relies on atmosphere as a storytelling device.

Look at OUATIA, a perfect example of a film that works masterfully on screen and would probably fail as words on a page. I view TOE in the same light.

Logged


Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre. What did you think of the script?
Pages: 1 ... 299 300 [301] 302 303 ... 1162 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.119 seconds with 19 queries.