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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1758608 times)
titoli
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« Reply #4515 on: October 12, 2008, 02:24:58 PM »

Le Doulos (1962) - 9/10
Le Deuxieme Souffle (1966) - 8/10


I've seen the first long time ago and I only vaguely remember it. But I think I gave it 7\10 at the time. Though it might turn into a  8\10.
Le Deuxieme Souffle is one of my all-time favourite gangster movies. Meurisse as the policeman delineates one of the great figures in the history of the genre (though Ventura is just as good).  I'll try to find dvd's of these, and I've just bought Le clan des siciliens avec the Maestro's famous score.

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« Reply #4516 on: October 12, 2008, 03:20:33 PM »

I've seen Natalie in a lot more than just Star Wars. Leon was the only role where she shows signs of life (I'll be fair, she was very good in it). The only time she came close to acting after that was Closer. Everything else I've seen her in she is void of any feeling.

Your opinion I suppose. I could posit a number of impressive performances I've seen of hers - her small role in Cold Mountain was excellent, for instance, and although I wasn't a big fan of the film as a whole, she was astonishing in The Other Boleyn Girl - not quite Genevieve Bujold, but very good regardless.
 
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As far as her looks go she is in the same league as Keira Knightly. Flat as a board and a boyish face. At least Knightly has a sexy accent to offer us.
There wasn't much to reveal.

Well, admitting she isn't a vuluptuous individual doesn't preclude her being attractive. In the right role/picture she is ravishingly gorgeous. I quite like her face personally - unlike Keira, who looks like a slack-jawed shark.

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« Reply #4517 on: October 12, 2008, 03:46:31 PM »

Le Deuxieme Souffle is one of my all-time favourite gangster movies. Meurisse as the policeman delineates one of the great figures in the history of the genre (though Ventura is just as good).  I'll try to find dvd's of these, and I've just bought Le clan des siciliens avec the Maestro's famous score.
Thank you, titoli, I'd much rather talk about Melville than Welles. I take your point about Meurisse. The scene in the bar where a killing has occurred, and where Inspector Blot arrives, ostensibly, to interview the witnesses, is the occasion for a wonderful routine: since the staff are all crooks that Blot knows, and he can easily guess what they'll say to him in advance, he cynically asks and then answers each of his questions before the others can respond. And all the answers are variations on "I didn't see a thing, officer." Highly amusing.

At 144 minutes, the film is quite long. I guess it reminds me of Le cercle rouge, although the earlier one now seems the better film. I find I generally prefer Melville's b&w pictures to those in color (his color palette being so odd).

By way of a provocation, let me throw out a quote from the critical essay that accompanies my new DVD:

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One of the most remarkable aspects of Le deuxieme souffle is its treatment of time. This emphasis is clearly signposted by the almost maddening preponderance of dates and times that appear on the screen, drawing attention to both the procedural and quotidian dimensions of the film we are watching. This play with time, it fragmentation and our awareness of it, places Le deuxieme souffle clearly within the realm of the sixties European art movie.
What say you to that? Evil

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« Reply #4518 on: October 12, 2008, 06:12:12 PM »

Thank you, titoli, I'd much rather talk about Melville than Welles. I take your point about Meurisse. The scene in the bar where a killing has occurred, and where Inspector Blot arrives, ostensibly, to interview the witnesses, is the occasion for a wonderful routine: since the staff are all crooks that Blot knows, and he can easily guess what they'll say to him in advance, he cynically asks and then answers each of his questions before the others can respond. And all the answers are variations on "I didn't see a thing, officer." Highly amusing.

At 144 minutes, the film is quite long. I guess it reminds me of Le cercle rouge, although the earlier one now seems the better film. I find I generally prefer Melville's b&w pictures to those in color (his color palette being so odd).

By way of a provocation, let me throw out a quote from the critical essay that accompanies my new DVD:
What say you to that? Evil

I say that the italian print I saw repeatedly (but last time must have been 15 years ago) doesn't even start to get to 90' maybe 100'. So I watched another movie...
Anyway, all the usual crap these critics you're so fond of quoting (and try to persuade other people to read: most of the times vainly, in my case) just try to earn their salary by writing something apparently clever. Which in this case it is not. Melvile, apart from his amazing first movies (my favourite being Les enfants terribles) stuck to the genre policiér, which can have little of avant-garde or art movie. And I think that compared to an earlier thriller like The Killing it is quite unrefined.   The strenght of this movie lies in the characters.

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« Reply #4519 on: October 12, 2008, 06:43:46 PM »

My Beautiful Laundrette - 4/10
The Apartment - 8.5/10

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« Reply #4520 on: October 12, 2008, 10:14:46 PM »

Cool Hand Luke - 8/10 - Second viewing courtesy of TCM. I don't think my opinion's much different than after my first viewing. I do think it drags a bit in spots though.

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« Reply #4521 on: October 12, 2008, 10:21:26 PM »

Cool Hand Luke - 8/10 - Second viewing courtesy fo TCM. I don't think my opinion's much different than after my first viewing. I do think it drags a bit in spots though.

I agree with your rating. I just finished watching it too.

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« Reply #4522 on: October 12, 2008, 10:42:02 PM »

Hud - 10/10
Somebody Up There Likes Me - 8/10
Cool Hand Luke - 10/10
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof - 8/10

Well to be honest I didn't actually sit down and watch these, though they were on and I did pay decent attention to them. I've seen all of these before, anyways. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is just starting but I plan on watching most of it.

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« Reply #4523 on: October 13, 2008, 03:14:43 AM »

The Rutles: All You Need Is Cash (1978) - 6/10
I see I gave it 7/10 last time around...

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« Reply #4524 on: October 13, 2008, 06:02:56 AM »

Shockproof (Sirk, 1949)

Samuel Fuller co-wrote this film and his fingerprints are all over it: campiness, the lack of logic but an overall compelling story. It has a ridiculoous conclusion but it's well worth a view. Not as good as The Naked Kiss or Shock Corridor but the movie moves at a swift pace and the highly underappreciated Cornel Wilde gives a worthy performance. enjoyable movie.

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« Reply #4525 on: October 13, 2008, 06:56:45 AM »

Lost in Translation (2003) - 9/10
Second viewing. One of the best movies of this decade. One of the most touching love stories ever. Afro

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« Reply #4526 on: October 13, 2008, 08:24:54 AM »

I say that the italian print I saw repeatedly (but last time must have been 15 years ago) doesn't even start to get to 90' maybe 100'. So I watched another movie...
Anyway, all the usual crap these critics you're so fond of quoting (and try to persuade other people to read: most of the times vainly, in my case) just try to earn their salary by writing something apparently clever. Which in this case it is not. Melvile, apart from his amazing first movies (my favourite being Les enfants terribles) stuck to the genre policiér, which can have little of avant-garde or art movie. And I think that compared to an earlier thriller like The Killing it is quite unrefined.   The strenght of this movie lies in the characters.
Do you mean the cut you saw was so altered that it was like another movie, or that you actually saw a completely different movie? There's another gangster film starring Meurisse as a cop and Ventura as a hood?

As I said, the quote I offered you was a provocation, and I guess it did its job, since you seem provoked. Moving right along . . . there's an audio commentary on my copy of the DVD with two critics, one of whom, Geoff Andrews, makes an interesting point (interesting, I should say, because it also occurred to me). He says that what Leone did for the Western, Melville did for the American gangster film. Beyond that, Andrews points out a bit of Leone-like composition and montage, from the heist sequence:


It isn't merely the widescreen landscape image of the first shot that reminds Andrews of Leone, but the sudden cut to the close-up of the bike rider as well.

Not convinced? Well, I wish I could show you the scene with the ants, but a screen capture of black ants on a white background just looks like abstract images.

It's all coincidence, though. This picture was released in 1966, so Melville and Leone were coming up with their ideas independently.

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« Reply #4527 on: October 13, 2008, 09:36:38 AM »

No, I saw deuxiéme souffle but in a butchered version. Tongue

How else could the scene have been effectively (or even just logically) shot if a director (who was not a hack) was behind the camera? Were there so many alternatives?  I think that the most obvious point of view from which to shoot a sniper's view is from behind his shoulders or giving his own pov. Can't see any quotation in this, except for the Almeria like ambience. But then what different scenery could you have picked up in France to have a ambush scene? There could have been a quotation will behind this, sure, but can 't see many alternatives to the actual realization of the scenes. 

I don't think the parallel Leone-Melville with their respective genre is sound because Leone invented one single-handedly, Melville just  adopted one which had already given us a masterpiece, by the time he came on the scene, like Hands off the Loot.   


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« Reply #4528 on: October 13, 2008, 12:50:59 PM »

No, I agree, there is no quotation going on here. As I said, Melville and Leone were developing their styles at the same time and independently of each other.

You are right about Grisbi (and other films by Becker) providing inspiration for Melville, but it's not true that SL came up with the so-called SW on his own. By his own admission, 30 or so Italian Westerns had come prior to AFOD. True, Grisbi is a great film, and the Italo Westerns prior to Leone were, undoubtedly, crap, but Yojimbo is also a great film. Perhaps all you can really say is that SL's influences were more disparate than Melville's. I do think, though, that it's interesting that both directors were primarily interested in homo-social milieus, with their attendant themes of honor, loyalty, and betrayal.

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« Reply #4529 on: October 13, 2008, 01:36:10 PM »

Jenkins, the 30 some euro (not only spaghetti) westerns that came before Leone were not influential on him. Otherwise this forum just wouldn't exist. Yojimbo may be a western, but it's not euro (or spaghetti). 
About what you label "homo-social milieu" that is only a way to have an action movie move by excluding the sentimental part. Bringing homosexuality into play is just a shortcut to smartedness (now tell me you said that just to be bothersome. Ok, you were.). 

P.S. I don't know how to explain to people who didn't see FOD at the time of release the hook in the stomach it was for all western and even not western fans. So I won't try. But Melville didn't make a revolution like Leone did. In fact Leone created an industry, Melville didn't. Western makers in USA would ignore Leone's movies only at their expenses, the american gangster movie makers could well afford to ignore Melville and do greatly.

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