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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1843774 times)
Groggy
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« Reply #5445 on: February 28, 2009, 11:58:36 PM »

She has something alright...

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« Reply #5446 on: March 01, 2009, 01:46:31 AM »

The Philadelpha Story. I give it a  Afro Afro Afro. Funny, even though it's damn old. If it was remade, it will make any Judd Apatow film look like shit. And if only James Stewart was a show stealer. One of my favorite actors, and Cary Grant had great chemistry with Stewart and Hepurn. Kate is a great actress, but something about her is not sexy at all. 
I have to rewatch this some time. I really liked it but my DVR had fucked up and it missed roughly 20 minutes in the middle Shocked And eventhough I found her more or less annoying in Bringing Up Baby I really liked Hepburn in this one.

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« Reply #5447 on: March 01, 2009, 06:14:49 AM »

Give me High Society, the remake with Grace Kelly, every time.

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« Reply #5448 on: March 01, 2009, 01:00:12 PM »

Kate is not in any way sexy or in my view even attractive. She's too frigid, shrill and self-absorbed to be attractive in anyway. There have been many actresses I've been attracted to in spite of a lack of physical attraction, but she's not one of them.

Does her agent sit around the office all day and only give Kate the scripts with explicit sex scenes in them?
That seems to be what actually goes on.

P.S. why can Groggy dump on Kate Winslet without any problem but when I so much as mention Natalie Portman I get God's wrath thrown down upon me? Cheesy

« Last Edit: March 01, 2009, 01:01:53 PM by The Firecracker » Logged



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« Reply #5449 on: March 01, 2009, 01:16:16 PM »

Is this a joke FC? If not, pay attention. Unless you can prove Kate Winslett was in The Philadelphia Story.

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« Reply #5450 on: March 01, 2009, 01:17:20 PM »

Give me High Society, the remake with Grace Kelly, every time.

I'm not a Grace Kelly fan either but she at least lacks Ms. Hepburn's abominable excuse for a voice.

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« Reply #5451 on: March 01, 2009, 04:41:44 PM »

Hamlet (1948)

Laurence Olivier is the greatest actor to capture Shakespeare on screen, and has proven be be the best director ever to adapt Shakespeare to the big screen. Purists will not like how he cut about 2 hours from the play, but his peformance was solid, and his directing was brilliant. Black and white and deep focus cinematography was a good choice, and really gave the a film noir look to it.

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« Reply #5452 on: March 01, 2009, 07:16:52 PM »

Kate is not in any way sexy or in my view even attractive. She's too frigid, shrill and self-absorbed to be attractive in anyway.

She had a few years on her back in ''On Golden Pond'', maybe it's because of that?

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« Reply #5453 on: March 01, 2009, 07:19:02 PM »

She killed Henry Fonda.

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dave jenkins
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« Reply #5454 on: March 01, 2009, 07:45:02 PM »

Hamlet (1948)

Laurence Olivier is the greatest actor to capture Shakespeare on screen, and has proven be be the best director ever to adapt Shakespeare to the big screen. Purists will not like how he cut about 2 hours from the play, but his peformance was solid, and his directing was brilliant. Black and white and deep focus cinematography was a good choice, and really gave the a film noir look to it.
The cuts aren't so much the problem as that they allow him to shape the play to fit his thesis that the play is about "a man who could not make up his mind." It's a shame Lord Larry fell for that reading of the play, which, as Nabokov and others have shown, is erroneous. Also, there's a bit too much Freud in all the goings on between Hamlet and his mom.

Olivier did not, in my opinion, serve Shakespeare well in this or in Richard III, but he scored the best film adaptation of the bard ever with Henry V. Of course, in that case, Olivier came aboard as director only after much preliminary thought and preparation had already gone into the project.

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« Reply #5455 on: March 02, 2009, 02:11:20 AM »

A Man Escaped (1956) - 8/10
Prison break story stripped down to the core. The narration is surprisingly bad at times (considering Bresson's reputation), half of it describing what we just saw. But sure it needed some of the narration.

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« Reply #5456 on: March 02, 2009, 05:34:49 AM »

8/0

 Huh
I think you missed a "1".

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« Reply #5457 on: March 02, 2009, 06:50:39 AM »

A Man Escaped (1956) - 8/0
Prison break story stripped down to the core. The narration is surprisingly bad at times (considering Bresson's reputation), half of it describing what we just saw. But sure it needed some of the narration.
Actually, it's part of Bresson's technique, used here and in other films. One writer offers an explanation at http://www.kinema.uwaterloo.ca/gorl001.htm

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In Bresson's works, first-person narration in the form of voice-over replaces dialogue as the primary means of relaying the story. But interestingly, what the narration tells us is usually nothing that we don't already know or are about to learn. In a way, it doubles the action.
[...]
Fontaine recounts through the voice-over how he made the rope -- "I folded the cloth four times, tucking the edges to avoid fraying. I twisted it and tied it with wire to hold the twist" -- at the same time as the camera shows this very same action to us. Outwardly, this duplication might seem to run contrary to Bresson's minimalist perspective, but in fact, there is no real redundancy, as the voice-over is never merely a simple commentary on the image, nor is the image a simple illustration of the text; their parallelism maintains that division which is present in our senses. Bresson deliberately overlaps narration and image in order to emphasize the significance of certain actions or details. Its punctuation also serves to establish a certain rhythm which helps to carry the narrative.

One important distinction between what is seen and what is spoken in the voice-over, is that while the visuals appear to be taking place in the present, the narration is always in the past-tense. This has the effect of breaking down real-time -- the illusion on which standard narrative structure is usually based. Bresson is never interested in maintaining a exact account of time in consistent duration. The passage of time is subjective and is measured in relation to significant events in the lives of the protagonists.
[...]
Subjective time plays a very important role in A Man Escaped as we follow Fontaine's slow, but determined efforts to escape. Fontaine measures time according to the routines of prison ("empty your bucket and wash, back to your cell for the day"), progress in relation to his escape ("for an iron spoon I had to wait several days"), "time passed, our chances faded"), intervals at which trains pass, guards change, and in terms of his physical state ("After three days I was able to move again").

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« Reply #5458 on: March 02, 2009, 10:24:34 AM »

Thanks, that's interesting Afro
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1) Bresson deliberately overlaps narration and image in order to emphasize the significance of certain actions or details. 2) Its punctuation also serves to establish a certain rhythm which helps to carry the narrative.
1) I'm not sure if that's a good technique.
2) This, on the other hand, makes more sense.

A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935) - 7.5/10
117 min version.

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« Reply #5459 on: March 02, 2009, 01:13:41 PM »

Coraline 3D (2009) - 6/10. A girl, neglected by her parents and unhappy with her new life in a rustic Oregon setting, finds a passageway to another--seemingly more wonderful--world. Plenty of fairy tale tropes and Hollywood plotting. The stop-go animation is surprisingly CGI-like. 3D adds occasional interest, but modern pacing and editing practices don't allow viewers to savor such moments. Those who can access only the 2D version: move out of the sticks, gentlemen.

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