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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1764309 times)
T.H.
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« Reply #8400 on: September 19, 2010, 06:22:34 PM »

The only complaints I can come up with:

the score is generic
three characters die in a span of 30 seconds - especially how the third was handled

I don't even think I've seen the sequel in its entirety. It's also been too long for me even to have an opinion.

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« Reply #8401 on: September 19, 2010, 07:30:14 PM »

La ragazza con la valigia (Girl with a Suitcase) (1961) 7/10

Nice vehicle for Claudia and Jacques Perrin, nice seeing Volonte in a bit part also.  Claudia looks beautiful no surprise. Afro

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« Reply #8402 on: September 19, 2010, 08:04:37 PM »

Wait Until Dark - 8/10 - Finally got to see this (thanks TCM Afro). Solid thriller, a bit contrived and stagey (hey, it is based on a play) but it mostly works. The finale between Audrey Hepburn and Alan Arkin is a doozy.

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« Reply #8403 on: September 19, 2010, 09:05:00 PM »

I don't know about that, I caught it the first time I saw the movie (I must have been 15) but as that is the whole point of the movie . . . .
The initiated know better. Where is that quote from Borges? Ah, here, right in my back pocket:
Quote
A kind of metaphysical detective story, its subject (both psychological and allegorical) is the investigation of a man’s inner self, through the works he has wrought, the words he has spoken, the many lives he has ruined. The same technique was used by Joseph Conrad in Chance (1914) and in that beautiful film The Power and the Glory: a rhapsody of miscellaneous scenes without chronological order. Overwhelmingly, endlessly, Orson Welles shows fragments of the life of the man, Charles Foster Kane, and invites us to combine them and to reconstruct him. Forms of multiplicity and incongruity abound in the film: the first scenes record the treasures amassed by Kane; in one of the last, a poor woman, luxuriant and suffering, plays with an enormous jigsaw puzzle on the floor of a palace that is also a museum. At the end we realize that the fragments are not governed by any secret unity: the detested Charles Foster Kane is a simulacrum, a chaos of appearances. (A possible corollary, foreseen by David Hume, Ernst Mach, and our own Macedonio Ferenandez: no man knows who he is, no man is anyone.) In a story by Chesterton—“The Head of Caesar,” I think—the hero observes that nothing is so frightening as a labyrinth with no center. This film is precisely that labyrinth.

Interestingly, in interviews later in life, Welles tried to distance himself from the "Rosebud Ending." He blamed Mankiewicz for the device--though conceding that it was necessary to get the action rolling.

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« Reply #8404 on: September 20, 2010, 02:55:32 AM »

The initiated know better.

Never said I was one. Thanks for confirmimg what I wrote, anyway.

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« Reply #8405 on: September 20, 2010, 03:33:03 AM »


Sliver (1993) - 3/10

Short review.

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« Reply #8406 on: September 20, 2010, 03:47:25 AM »

I thought Predator 2 started out okay but after the warehouse scene with the liquid nitrogen it got tiresome.

That scene in near the end of the movie, isn't it? After that the detective and the predator go one-on-one around the city until they end up in the creature's ship for the finale.

I thought it was very entertaining.

So our moderator is a guy who gives 7.5/10 to predator and fancies a lot the sequel... Mkay... Democracy at it's best I guess...

Seriously, the smartass inside me cannot help but say that Predator is supposed to be the first film in history to have been fully digitally edited (although it was 100% shot on film, of course, look at the production year, for Clint's sake). Fir the better or for the worst, that makes that movie part of History.
That and the "Knock knock!" line.

I'm sorry, I don't have much time right now: what do you mean?

The only complaints I can come up with:

the score is generic
three characters die in a span of 30 seconds - especially how the third was handled

I don't even think I've seen the sequel in its entirety. It's also been too long for me even to have an opinion.

Yeah, the overall soundtrack is a bit generic, but ''Long Tall Sally'' kicks ass in the beginning.

Can't remember who died third right now.

The atmosphere perhaps could have been darker in the beginning, but then again at the time the movie was released nobody knew what was chasing them exactly, so maybe not.

I seriously can't think what's wrong with it, but I can sense something is... I'll be back.

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« Reply #8407 on: September 20, 2010, 03:48:46 AM »

And say, nice appearance from good old R. G. Armstrong. Afro

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« Reply #8408 on: September 20, 2010, 03:51:12 AM »

I'm sorry, I don't have much time right now: what do you mean?
I think he means that we have given the powers of a god to a mental midget.

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« Reply #8409 on: September 20, 2010, 03:53:15 AM »

I think he means that we have given the powers of a god to a mental midget.

Your english is far better than mine!

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« Reply #8410 on: September 20, 2010, 04:29:09 AM »

I think he means that we have given the powers of a god to a mental midget.

The second part of the message, you ever wise mental colossus. Grin

Your english is far better than mine!

I'm not even gonna start laughing, cause I do not think I would be ever able to stop.

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« Reply #8411 on: September 20, 2010, 07:23:50 AM »

I meant Predator was the first movie 100% edited on a computer, boss.

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« Reply #8412 on: September 20, 2010, 01:24:52 PM »

Metropolis (1927) 2/10. Not liking Silents I've avoided this for years, but with this new version (that restores about 30 minutes of cut material) and the chance to see it presented with live music (a three-piece group who call themselves Alloy Orchestra), I decided to take the plunge. Turns out the score was overly literal, but the film—a total bore. Oh, sure, there are a few iconic images I appreciated seeing in all their b&w luster, but the story is interminable. And the extra footage just makes everything drag on and on (I gave up caring whether the children were ever going to escape the rising water). Another thing about the extra material: although we are assured that a lot of restoration work was applied, it looks terrible. And the constant intercutting between the “older” footage (which looks fabulous) and the “newer” stuff (which looks like it has been dragged back and forth across a cement floor for 80 years, then left out in the sun to fade) creates such a jarring contrast that I found it impossible to “stay in” the picture. I'm certain that all this extra material is interesting to scholars—but is this really the best way to present the film to the general public?

The Town (2010) 8/10 http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=9682.0

Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951) 7/10. A Powell and Pressburger film without Powell and Pressburger. Directed by Albert Lewin, the Technicolor photography is supplied by Jack Cardiff, the Archers' usual DP. Thus some stunningly arresting shots are provided that make one wonder if Powell didn't often get credit for compositions owing more to Cardiff's skill and invention. Although the plot (about the Flying Dutchman (James Mason)—an immortal under a curse to wander the seas until he can find a woman who will love him enough to die for him) isn't up to Pressburger's standards, the visuals (shown to advantage on the new Blu-ray disc) provide a good deal of compensation. And did I mention that Ava Gardner is in the film?

Leaves of Grass (2009) -  9/10.  A popular and respected Classics professor at Brown (Edward Norton) returns to his Oklahoma roots and the mom and twin brother (Norton again) he hasn't seen for 12 years.  The professor learns that family and home should not be taken for granted, yada, yada, yada. That's the way it starts out, anyway—then things suddenly turn Coens-esque. Well, director Tim Blake Nelson was in O Brother, Where Art Thou, so I guess he knows who he's stealing from. The film isn't perfect: Keri Russell is dropped into the middle of things just to be the professor's sudden love interest (she plays a poet who has turned her back on academia to live in Little Dixie, OK where she can go noodling for catfish and who looks like a model and who is completely unattached until Norton shows up. Uh huh). Late in the film there's an action sequence that suddenly shifts to cheap, handheld digital  (were they running short on the budget?) that is not only jarring but makes it impossible to figure out what is going on. These are minor qualms, though: the movie is often funny, especially when Richard Dreyfus makes an appearance as a Jewish drug lord (I kid you not). I saw this for $13 (the current price for film showings in Manhattan), and I've just learned that the Blu-ray streets in 3 weeks for $13.49. Why do I have the feeling that Nelson (and the Coens) are laughing at me?

Jack Goes Boating (2010) – 8/10. Phillip Seymour Hoffman directs Phillip Seymour Hoffman, in a film (originally a play) about a bit of a dim bulb (Hoffman) who gets set up with a freaky neurotic woman (Amy Ryan) and, with a bit of coaching from their married friends (the couple who brought them together), start to make a go of it. The courtship of these 40-something naifs would be too annoyingly cute to stand if it were not for the fact that gradually the film becomes more about the married friends who, it is revealed, are unraveling as a couple. The film's climax is an extended scene during a dinner party that goes terribly wrong that has the four characters on an emotional rollercoaster ride that has to be seen to be believed. It's a drama with a lot of drama—and in this case, with such an excellent cast, that's a good thing.

A Woman, a Gun, and a Noodle Shop (2010) – 6/10. This sounds good on paper (“A Zhang Yimou film based on the Coen Brothers' movie Blood Simple) but in execution turns out to be a bit of a chore to sit through. I had much the same feeling I had when watching Van Sant's Psycho remake—that I'd seen it all before (imagine that). These kinds of exercises are better done as trailers . . . and left at that.

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« Reply #8413 on: September 20, 2010, 03:59:47 PM »

Metropolis (1927) 2/10. Not liking Silents I've avoided this for years, but with this new version (that restores about 30 minutes of cut material) and the chance to see it presented with live music (a three-piece group who call themselves Alloy Orchestra), I decided to take the plunge. Turns out the score was overly literal, but the film—a total bore. Oh, sure, there are a few iconic images I appreciated seeing in all their b&w luster, but the story is interminable. And the extra footage just makes everything drag on and on (I gave up caring whether the children were ever going to escape the rising water). Another thing about the extra material: although we are assured that a lot of restoration work was applied, it looks terrible. And the constant intercutting between the “older” footage (which looks fabulous) and the “newer” stuff (which looks like it has been dragged back and forth across a cement floor for 80 years, then left out in the sun to fade) creates such a jarring contrast that I found it impossible to “stay in” the picture. I'm certain that all this extra material is interesting to scholars—but is this really the best way to present the film to the general public?
I have a version running around 120 minutes on my DVR waiting to be watched. Yesterday I decided to wait until I can see the fullest possible version but now you got me thinking. If the newly added material is as bad as you tell, I'm not sure if that's the version I want to see on my initial viewing. Then again, you can't appreciate silent cinema... (Tomorrow is not the day to watch it anyway 'cause it's a hang over day.)

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« Reply #8414 on: September 21, 2010, 08:11:40 AM »

I think the new version has a running time around 147 minutes. I would really recommend watching the 120 minute version first. You can always watched the extended version after that if you need certain plot points made clearer or what have you.

For the record, there are a few Silents I can appreciate: The General, The Passion of Joan of Arc, and Duvivier's Au bonheur des dames are all films I've enjoyed and would like to see again.

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