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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1768639 times)
dave jenkins
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« Reply #9465 on: September 04, 2011, 11:49:07 PM »

Senna (2010) - 9/10. A documentary on the career of Ayrton Senna, a kind of god of Formula 1, apparently. The great thing is, you don't have to be a fan of racing (and I'm not) to enjoy this. The film is assembled like a feature, with the hero overcoming several setbacks and an evil rival to notch up three world championships. It's like Grand Prix without the soap opera bits, and with real people instead of actors. The only thing I can fault the film for is the overuse of foreshadowing--the ending is telegraphed. For people who already know the story that may be no big deal, but for those of us who went in without knowing anything in advance, it would have been better if the climax came as more of a shock. Still, this is a great bit of editing, and a terrifically entertaining flick.

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« Reply #9466 on: September 05, 2011, 01:14:43 PM »

The Far Country - 9/10 - 2nd viewing.

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« Reply #9467 on: September 05, 2011, 03:02:11 PM »

The Far Country - 9/10 - 2nd viewing.

a damn good movie, but I wouldn't rate it that high. I'd give it like an 8.2. it is indeed a terrific watch.

(the one time I saw it, I started watching on TCM about ten minutes after it started. I tried catching up to the first few mins. by reading the beginning of the plot synopsis online. Still, maybe I was a bit lost  Wink)

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« Reply #9468 on: September 05, 2011, 03:14:25 PM »

Above The Law (1988) caught the last 45 minutes of this and was impressed, it may be the best Steven Seagal film I ever saw (and I haven't been impressed with any), I guess it was his first film, and has veteran Henry Silva as the chief villain with Pam Grier, and Sharon Stone, may have to rent this on Netflix to give it a proper review. Some nice realistic looking shots of action on top a moving train. Seagal looks good, a departure from his later pyramid shaped persona,  Grin, Afro Afro

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« Reply #9469 on: September 05, 2011, 05:09:09 PM »

Above The Law (1988) caught the last 45 minutes of this and was impressed, it may be the best Steven Seagal film I ever saw (and I haven't been impressed with any), I guess it was his first film, and has veteran Henry Silva as the chief villain with Pam Grier, and Sharon Stone, may have to rent this on Netflix to give it a proper review. Some nice realistic looking shots of action on top a moving train. Seagal looks good, a departure from his later pyramid shaped persona,  Grin, Afro Afro

Apparently you don't read my reviews. Or maybe you don't trust them. Angry

Anyway, I seem to remember (it is the only Seagal movie I didn't check again - over here there's no dvd - of his first four) that Out for Justice is even better.

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« Reply #9470 on: September 05, 2011, 06:09:18 PM »

for the second time, I saw parts of the "Movies and Moguls" show on TCM. just wanted to give a shout-out to a great documentary. And once again, a loud FUCK YOU to the self-aggrandizing pigs in political office and the Justice Dep't that stick their asses where it don't belong with their bullshit antitrust laws, destroying honest businesses that hardworking people built with blood, sweat, and tears

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« Reply #9471 on: September 05, 2011, 06:27:52 PM »

3 by Abbas Kiarostami, the "Koker Trilogy," so-called because the films are centered on and around an Iranian village of that name. The films are not narratively linked, so it would be better to call them the Koker Trio or Koker Triptych. All three films use a combination of actors and non-professionals.

Where is the Friend's House? (1987) - 8/10. A simple story about an 8-year-old boy who mistakenly brings home the notebook of his classmate. Knowing that his friend cannot complete his homework without it, and knowing also that there will be hell to pay if the kid shows up at school the next day without having done the assignment, the boy determines to take the notebook back to his friend. But it's not so easy. The adults about the boy are indifferent to his predicament. First, his mother wants him to do his own homework and then run an errand for her, so he is forced to sneak away. The friend lives in a nearby village, and the boy goes there, but he doesn't know the address or how to get to the house. When he asks people for directions, they are unhelpful. Even when people try to help they end up sending him on wild goose chases.  SPOILERS Finally, night closing in, the boy returns home, defeated. As he sits, later, doing his homework, something amazing happens: a strong wind blows open a door; outside we see the boy's mother scrambling to keep the washing on the clothesline from being carried off. This simple image of a hostile world, and of human endevour in the midst of it, quietly points up the director's theme ("quietly" being the operative word--there is no need for musical underscoring). The next day the boy arrives at school and hands in his notebook as well as his friend's: he has done the homework for both of them. END SPOILERS.

And Life Goes On (1992) - 10/10. A fictional director who has made a film called Where is the Friend's House? tries to return to the village where it was shot after an earthquake has devastated the region. Whether or not he makes it to the village we never learn--the important thing is the journey, not the destination. Everywhere as the filmmaker travels in his little car there are scenes of destruction--and of people picking up and getting on with their lives. A series of vignettes illustrate the film's title, which is also its theme. Some of the "actors" from the first film are encountered. SPOILER One scene is particularly impressive: an old woman is attempting to pull a carpet out from under the rubble (the woman is indoors, we are outside, we hear this more than see it). The filmmaker tries to help her, but he has a bad back, he pronounces the effort futile. He stikes up a conversation with a young man who is apparently newly married. It turns out the man and his bride were wed the day after the earthquake. The filmmaker is amazed--the couple must not have lost many relatives in the quake, he guesses. On the contrary, about 65 family members died; the mourning period could last up to a year, and the couple simply hadn't wanted to wait. The young man bids the filmmaker goodbye, stops at the old woman's house to tell her he will come help her later. As he departs, the woman emerges from her house, dragging the carpet out with her. END SPOILER. The film ends with an astonishing long shot of a car attempting to drive up a hill. Kiarostami gets an incredible amount of drama out of tiny objects in the distance.

Through the Olive Trees (1994) - 9/10. An actor begins with a direct address to the camera, explaining that he is playing the director in the film. We then see a casting call among girl students--but are they being cast for the film, or the film within the film? The film within the film is about a director who is attempting to return to Koker after an earthquake has devastated the region. We see the actor from And Life Goes On playing the scene where he talks to the bridegroom about getting married the day after the earthquake. But there are problems, re-takes, the director can't get the shot. He replaces the man playing the bridegroom, but he has trouble with the new actor. It turns out that the man now playing the bridegroom has been unsuccessfully attempting to court the woman playing the bride. The woman lost her parents in the earthquake, making courtship all the more difficult, besides which the feelings of the woman are unclear. The director tries to solve the young man's problem in an attempt to solve his own. The film ends with an astonishing long shot of the man pursuing the obscure object of his desire. Kiarostami gets an incredible amount of drama out of tiny people in the distance.

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« Reply #9472 on: September 05, 2011, 07:05:45 PM »

Apparently you don't read my reviews. Or maybe you don't trust them. Angry

Anyway, I seem to remember (it is the only Seagal movie I didn't check again - over here there's no dvd - of his first four) that Out for Justice is even better.

  Cool I think the search on this site is the fault .

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« Reply #9473 on: September 05, 2011, 10:31:24 PM »

MAN OF THE WEST (1958) 8.9/10

absolutely spectacular! completely blown away! the best Western I have seen in a looooong time!

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« Reply #9474 on: September 05, 2011, 10:51:12 PM »

3 from the Coens, what I like to call their Sonnenfeld Trilogy (or Trio, or Triptych), because they were all lensed by Barry Sonnenfeld.


Blood Simple
(1984) - 10/10. First blu-ray viewing. A credible neo-noir, the Coens treating the genre with respect, not taking the piss, as they would invariably do afterwards. Carter Burwell's score doesn't suck on this, either.

Raising Arizona (1987) - 7/10. First blu-ray viewing. Very funny at times, at other times, obnoxiously silly. Carter Burwell's score is innocuous.

Miller's Crossing (1990) - 9/10. First blu-ray viewing. Incredibly funny pastiche/parody of The Glass Key. The photography is, in Sonnenfeld's term, "handsome." The only failing is the annoying Carter Burwell score.

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« Reply #9475 on: September 06, 2011, 06:44:24 AM »

3 from the Coens, what I like to call their Sonnenfeld Trilogy (or Trio, or Triptych), because they were all lensed by Barry Sonnenfeld.


Blood Simple
(1984) - 10/10. First blu-ray viewing. A credible neo-noir, the Coens treating the genre with respect, not taking the piss, as they would invariably do afterwards. Carter Burwell's score doesn't suck on this, either.

Raising Arizona (1987) - 7/10. First blu-ray viewing. Very funny at times, at other times, obnoxiously silly. Carter Burwell's score is innocuous.

Miller's Crossing (1990) - 9/10. First blu-ray viewing. Incredibly funny pastiche/parody of The Glass Key. The photography is, in Sonnenfeld's term, "handsome." The only failing is the annoying Carter Burwell score.

I like all these also  Afro

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« Reply #9476 on: September 06, 2011, 02:24:50 PM »

The Debt (2011) - 10/10. My brothers, there are espionage films, and then there are espionage films. Ho.Lee.Shit. If it weren't for the fact Tom Wilkinson is in the picture, I'd be giving this an 11.

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« Reply #9477 on: September 07, 2011, 04:21:42 AM »

Miller's Crossing (1990) - 9/10. First blu-ray viewing. Incredibly funny pastiche/parody of The Glass Key. The photography is, in Sonnenfeld's term, "handsome." The only failing is the annoying Carter Burwell score.

... well, you cannot deny some other flaws:

- wrong pacing
- terrible camerawork and editing during the fights
- you can usually predict what is going to happen
- the movie has some style and is elegant, but also looks cheap as hell
- in the end, the audience realise that they really don't care about what happens

Don't get me wrong, I like the movie, but 9/10 is a lot.

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« Reply #9478 on: September 07, 2011, 05:40:51 AM »

Flashman (1967) On the backcover somebody dubbed this superhero movie "a pop masterpiece". Actually there is little or no "pop" and it is far from a masterpiece. But there are some good stunts and an impressive aerial view of the roman city of Baalbek. 4\10

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« Reply #9479 on: September 07, 2011, 05:37:44 PM »

I just dug into the box in the back of the closet and found my VHS copy of The Pawnbroker (1964) and had a screening, Wow, very, very noir-ish cinematography in a lot of sequences, this even has a crime angel, flashbacks, and Dutch angles.

Directed by Sidney Lumet with a powerful performance by Rod Stieger. Its a perfect example of the type of film that fits what I'm coining Near Noir film style. For any unfamilair the story is about a Pawnbroker, holocaust survivor who has lost all faith in his fellow man and who realizes much too late the consequences of taking such a track through whats left of his life.

The location filming on East 116th St and Park Avenue in Uptown Manhattan and other Harlem locations circa 1964 along with all the great character actors who portray his customers and the denizens of the "hood" make this a gem. 10/10

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