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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1768295 times)
Groggy
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« Reply #9615 on: October 22, 2011, 01:51:35 PM »

The Lion King - 10/10

I have never seen it as a child. My parents were too lazy to take me to the cinema.

This is epic, beautiful and quite dark despite the added humor. Hamlet in any form is still Hamlet!

I cried. A lot.

Also, Shenzi is totally like Bellatrix Lestrange (or Bellatrix was modeled after her). And Scar? Hilariously awesome. His Villain Song is just the best.

Bonus: I watched it dubbed in Hungarian. Back then we had amazing stage actors doing dubs, and guess who's Mufasa here? Frank's Hungarian voice! And Scar is Cheyenne's voice actor. I ROFL'd.

That was the first film I ever saw in theaters, and still probably my favorite Disney film. I've been tempted to see it on its re-release.

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« Reply #9616 on: October 22, 2011, 05:11:05 PM »

That was the first film I ever saw in theaters, and still probably my favorite Disney film. I've been tempted to see it on its re-release.
Children! There are children posting to this board!

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« Reply #9617 on: October 22, 2011, 06:57:13 PM »

Go to bed, old man.

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« Reply #9618 on: October 22, 2011, 08:37:00 PM »

The Yakusa (1974) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073918/ Directed by Sidney Pollack written by Paul Schrader and  Robert Towne. Staring Robert Mitchum, Ken Takakura,  Herb Edelman, Richard Jordan,  Keiko Kishi, Eiji Okada,  and Brian Keith.  I don't know who recommended this, or remember how I put this on my Netflix list but I'm sure glad I did, excellent film on a great DVD release.

A poster on IMDB sums it up nicely: The story is rich and multi-layered, featuring not one but two sets of star-crossed lovers in a brilliant and melancholy examination of contrasting themes of memory, secrets and betrayal, friendship, honor and obligation. The script is both literate and intricate; the characters' motives are almost always obscure until another layer of deception is stripped away.

Story Harry Kilmer (Mitchum) returns to Japan after several years in order to rescue his friend George's (Kieth) kidnapped daughter - and ends up on the wrong side of the Yakuza.  Watch it and add another great film to Mitchum's CV.  WhyTF isn't this ever shown on TCM or AMC or in rotation on some other network??? It should be more well known. 9/10

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« Reply #9619 on: October 22, 2011, 08:43:37 PM »

Firecreek - 7/10 - Perfectly serviceable oater with reluctant Sheriff James Stewart standing up to Henry Fonda's gang of ruffians and malefactors. Somewhere between the Leone/Peckinpah school of '60s Westerns and more old-fashioned fare, with a derivative story and classic Hollywood stars mixing with some grisly violence and sexual content. The plot isn't wholly original but unfolds at an interesting pace, the tension building to a solid finale. Stewart is good doing his Anthony Mann schtick, but Fonda's conflicted villain probably seemed more interesting on paper than he comes off in the film. Jack Elam and Gary Lockwood make especially hateful bad guys. Worth a look.

« Last Edit: October 22, 2011, 08:47:12 PM by Groggy » Logged


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« Reply #9620 on: October 23, 2011, 06:38:31 AM »

Firecreek - 7/10 - Perfectly serviceable oater with reluctant Sheriff James Stewart standing up to Henry Fonda's gang of ruffians and malefactors. Somewhere between the Leone/Peckinpah school of '60s Westerns and more old-fashioned fare, with a derivative story and classic Hollywood stars mixing with some grisly violence and sexual content. The plot isn't wholly original but unfolds at an interesting pace, the tension building to a solid finale. Stewart is good doing his Anthony Mann schtick, but Fonda's conflicted villain probably seemed more interesting on paper than he comes off in the film. Jack Elam and Gary Lockwood make especially hateful bad guys. Worth a look.
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« Reply #9621 on: October 23, 2011, 07:22:34 AM »

Melancholia - Lars von Trier

I didn't understand anything, and it was a bit overlong, but it was partly fascinating and it sticks in your head for a long time. 8/10

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« Reply #9622 on: October 23, 2011, 11:17:07 AM »

The Hanging Tree - 8/10 - Delmer Daves is great at character-driven Westerns and this is no exception. I saw a lot of bitching about "melodrama" on the pertinent thread but that strikes me as silly when the characters so well-drawn. Gary Cooper is excellent playing against type and the complicated character relationships make for interesting viewing, though the ending is a bit awkward. The cast is excellent save George C. Scott, wasted in a bizarre role. Beautiful photography and a nice score though I could have done without the goofy title song.

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« Reply #9623 on: October 23, 2011, 01:20:40 PM »

The Hanging Tree - 8/10 - Delmer Daves is great at character-driven Westerns and this is no exception. I saw a lot of bitching about "melodrama" on the pertinent thread but that strikes me as silly when the characters so well-drawn. Gary Cooper is excellent playing against type and the complicated character relationships make for interesting viewing, though the ending is a bit awkward. The cast is excellent save George C. Scott, wasted in a bizarre role. Beautiful photography and a nice score though I could have done without the goofy title song.

I couldn't find the movie on Netflix... where'd you see it?

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« Reply #9624 on: October 23, 2011, 01:49:35 PM »

It was on TCM the other day.

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« Reply #9625 on: October 23, 2011, 02:37:02 PM »

It was on TCM the other day.

Looks like it's one of those movies that isn't really available, except on TCM, I guess.

It is not on Netflix (weird; it's not even listed as "unavailable," or "dvd release date unknown." There is no reference to it on the site at all).

It's not on iTunes.

on Amazon, it's one of those that are available on like VHS, other regions dvd etc; pretty much anything except Region 1 dvd.

and some weird copies being sold on eBay, etc.

so basically, it's one of those movies that  is not available in a NORMAL way (ie. official  R1 dvd) but if I really, really wanna get, there are ways to find it (eg. questionable copies on eBay, vhs, portuguese version with english audio, etc. etc. etc.)

ie.  unless you tell me it is absolutely essential and worth doing anything and everything for, I am just gonna wait till the next time it shows up on TCM  Smiley

« Last Edit: October 23, 2011, 05:11:27 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

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« Reply #9626 on: October 23, 2011, 04:41:49 PM »

So far as I know it doesn't have a proper DVD release. Strange, as it doesn't seem to be a particularly obscure movie.

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« Reply #9627 on: October 23, 2011, 05:16:36 PM »

Afraid to Talk / aka Merry-Go-Round (1932) - 7/10. This pre-code tale of city corruption is a real corker. When a bellboy witnesses the murder of a notorious gangster, he is, against his better judgement, persuaded by an assistant DA (Louis Calhern, at his reptilian best) to testify. The ADA promises the bellboy he'll receive all the protection he needs. He gets it too, until the murderer, another gangland chief, reveals why he had his rival rubbed out: the guy was carrying info incriminating the corrupt Mayor and top members of his administration. Now that he's holding this material, the mobster (Edward Arnold) uses it as his Get Out of Jail Free card. But Louis Calhern has a problem; if Arnold walks, who will take the rap for the murder? Hmmm, well, that bellboy who was gonna testify WAS found at the scene of the crime . . . . better bring him back in for more questioning! A great 3rd Degree scene follows (which, CJ, includes a swinging light routine). Eventually virtue triumphs, but a very cynical ending suggests that the victory is only temporary. This film gets a heck of a lot of plot into a 69 minute running time, and even packs in a number of laughs. I saw a restored version projected at MOMA today that looked fabulous; I hope it's coming to DVD.

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« Reply #9628 on: October 25, 2011, 10:06:08 AM »

Moneyball

As a follow-up to Jenkins' piece, I encountered this on the Washington Post. Almost a month late but worth a look:

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Before the baseball season ends in a few days and before “Moneyball” leaves movie theaters and the public consciousness, I need to say a few things. Not that many sports issues get me riled up, but “Moneyball,” the first letter capitalized or not, gets me going. Now, let me state first that I consider Michael Lewis, who wrote the book on which the movie was based, to be a brilliant thinker and writer, the absolute best at what he does, which is making complicated subjects accessible, new and revealing.

But I absolutely hate the movie “Moneyball” and everything it stands for. I think it is a fraud, one that people I respect bought into, for what they thought were noble reasons having to do with the little guys vs. the big bullies. I also dislike the philosophy of moneyball as it is applied to sports. My problem with the movie is a matter of truth. My problem with the philosophy is a question of art and beauty.

The movie features Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland A’s, and his struggle to make a success out of a small-market franchise in a world where baseball teams with the most money can buy the best players.

Nothing to dispute there; the New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox and a few other big-market teams have the money and buy the best players when they can. (I hate them, too, by the way.) But to watch “Moneyball,” one would think that Beane, played by Brad Pitt, was a genius because, with the astute guidance of a lovably pudgy baseball nerd, he forced the manager to play Scott Hatteberg, a poor fielder with an excellent on-base percentage, at first base, and pulled off a trade that brought in a reliever named Ricardo Rincon, who also projected well in the mathematical equations Beane and his sidekick decided led directly to wins. Those are the two key bits of baseball strategy in the movie. Watching it, one would think that those moves led inexorably to the record-breaking ­20-game winning streak of the 2002 A’s.

And that is the deceit of the movie, one that the writers, directors and actors had to know. Why were the A’s successful that year? The main reason was that they had three of the best starters in the American League — Tim Hudson, Barry Zito and Mark Mulder — pitching for them. All three were drafted on the recommendation of the team’s scouts, who are portrayed in the movie as morons who just don’t get it. Zito, the A’s first-round pick in 1999, won the Cy Young Award in 2002 with a 23-5 win-loss record and a 2.75 earned run average. Hudson, selected in the sixth round by the A’s in 1997, went 15-9 in 2002 with a 2.98 earned run average. And Mulder, picked in the first round by the A’s in 1998, went 19-7 with a 3.47 earned run average.

Yet Zito and Mulder are not mentioned in the movie, while Hudson is shown only fleetingly, blowing an 11-0 lead. And there is only one brief action shot of the other true star of that 2002 team — Miguel Tejada, the Dominican shortstop the A’s signed as a teenager. All Tejada did that year was bat .308 and hit 34 home runs and win the American League’s Most Valuable Player award. What did moneyball have to do with these four key players? Nothing. And what happened to the genius of Billy Beane after they all eventually left the A’s? The team has barely been heard from since. Other small-market teams, including the Minnesota Twins, Milwaukee Brewers and Tampa Bay Rays, have far outpaced them.

But enough about the inside-baseball aspect. My biggest problem with “Moneyball” has more to do with aesthetics and the meaning of life. This is my answer to those friends who think that “Moneyball” is some paean to the underdogs. That notion is garbage — it really is an ode to the old Vince Lombardi saying (which was not his, but that is another story), “Winning isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.” If the moneyball concept worked to perfection, what would it lead to? A team full of Scott Hattebergs who play no defense, hit okay but not great and draw a ton of walks.

Nothing against Hatteberg — it was not his fault that he became a symbol; he was just a ballplayer. But what is the beauty of baseball? What is its meaning beyond wins and losses?

The thrill of baseball has nothing to do with statistics, as much a part of the game as they are. It has to do with the athletic skill of the players: the rifle throw from right field to third base; the dazzling speed of a runner stealing a base; the grace of a second baseman making the turn on a double play.

Perhaps “Moneyball” struck a chord with audiences because it presented what seemed like a fresh, unromantic, realist’s view while also presenting a smart plan of attack for the little guys. But in doing so, it not only perpetrated a fraud, it also glorified statistics over beauty and joy, and that is a trade-off that diminishes life itself.

The writer is an associate editor of The Post. His latest book is “Where He Came From: The Story of Barack Obama,” to be published next summer.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/moneyball-the-movie-is-a-big-swing-and-a-miss/2011/10/23/gIQAk59eDM_story.html

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« Reply #9629 on: October 27, 2011, 06:27:32 AM »

The Razors Edge (1946) Director: Edmund Goulding, Writers: Lamar Trotti (screenplay), based on W. Somerset Maugham (novel), with  Tyrone Power, Gene Tierney Clifton Webb, Anne Baxter, and John Payne. Story of WWI fighter pilot who decides to "loaf" in search for the meaning of life, goes to Paris & India , yadda, yadda, finds enlightenment through a guru, lol, a bit predictable but just entertaining enough. Tierney is gorgeous in some sequences, Power & Payne are good, Webb is Webb and Anne Baxter is probably the best her transformation from young housewife, to alcoholic French prostitute, to on the wagon frump gives her the widest range. 7/10

« Last Edit: October 27, 2011, 06:32:18 AM by cigar joe » Logged

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