Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 21, 2017, 08:15:09 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 687 688 [689] 690 691 ... 1162 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1766162 times)
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10320 on: March 28, 2012, 09:37:13 PM »

Waterloo - 5/10 - Just the kind of historical epic I dislike: all scope, no substance. The first hour is very choppy, as if huge swathes of plot are missing. Dialogue is all exposition, characterization pathetic. Style choices are very odd: slow-motion, odd pans during battle scenes, frantic cutting and misused zooms/close-ups provie disconcerting. The battle scenes are certainly astonishing in scope (the cavalry riding amongst the British squares is amazing) but mostly lack visceral impact. Rod Steiger is awful; given free range to chew scenery he makes John Barrymore look subtle. Christopher Plummer makes a good if one-dimensional Wellington. The rest of the cast is scenery. Rota's score is lame.

« Last Edit: March 28, 2012, 09:38:29 PM by Groggy » Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8313

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #10321 on: March 28, 2012, 10:46:05 PM »

I said it was crap.

and also nothing about it being white guilt crap??

btw, once you asked about it in Dances With Wolves, I'll just say that I thought the treatment of the Indians was pretty even. I am no historian of the Wild West, but I think it is fair to say that neither the early "Indians= evil, Whites=good" Westerns, nor some of the later "Indians=good, Whites=evil" Westerns are perfectly accurate. There were many different tribes and individual Indians, just as there were many whites, and not all acted in the same way, and I'd bet that neither side was right in 100% of the cases. In Dances With Wolves, the whites are portrayed as having stolen the Sioux's land; but on the other hand, the film is very clear about the barbaric nature of many Indian customs, though of course that would not necessarily excuse stealing their land. And other Indian tribes who fought the Sioux are portrayed as being bad as well.
I have no idea about the nature and customs of the various Indian tribes, but overall I felt that it seemed like a pretty fair portrayal, in that it was clear about their barbarism as well.
But I did have a problem with the portrayal of the whites, which seemed a bit over the top, in basically a direct reversal of the portrayals found in the 40's westerns: other than Costner, it seemed like there wasn't a decent white man in the territory (unlike eg. Cheyenne Autumn, which portrayed many whites as being sympathetic to the Cheyenne's plight).


p.s. reading Roger Ebert's review now, he says this is basically like a "what if" movie, ie. what if there actually had been whites who had been sympathetic to the Indians, etc. I can agree on that.
However, when discussing that white woman whom Costner eventually marries, Ebert says that she was found by the Indians after her family was killed. I laughed at loud while reading that, because what actually happened is that she was kidnapped by the Sioux after THEY killed her family. But if the Westerns of the 40's were so one-sided in their hatred of Indians, Roger Ebert is the kind of asshole who would be equally one-sided in his white self-hatred, like so many other good liberals. eg. in his review of Training Day, he felt it necessary to point out that it seemed strange that the black cop would be the bad guy since the instances of police brutality in LA had been of whites mistreating blacks. Really Roger? this is a fucking movie. Denzel is a great actor and was perfect for the role, regardless of skin color.
I love Ebert as a movie critic, but he fancies himself a political commentator as well, a role in which he is far less convincing. He gave The Green Berets ZERO stars, and Capitalism:A Love Story three and a half stars. I mean, seriously, that guy is very obnoxious when he strays from the one thing he does well, which is reviewing movies.

« Last Edit: March 29, 2012, 05:36:48 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10322 on: March 29, 2012, 04:12:14 AM »

and also nothing about it being white guilt crap??

Mostly I complained about it being garbled. But I always complain about hamfisted posturing regardless of what the topic is.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8313

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #10323 on: March 29, 2012, 08:07:07 AM »

I was not aware till after I watched Dances With Wolves that it was a Director's Cut, and was like an hour longer than the originally released version. But it is amazing how this movie never dragged, but kept me me interested, and enjoying every moment of it,  for 3 hours 53 minutes.

--The locations were simply breathtaking. The buffalo hunt was masterful; the cinematography and editing were incredible. What a directorial debut for Costner!

-- It was a great decision to have the Indians speaking in their language, and use subtitles, rather than have them speak English. Subtitles used to annoy me a lot, but I have really come to appreciate now, how much more authentic a movie feels when the characters are speaking their language. (Besides, in this movie, it would have been impossible for the Indians to speak English, since so much of the movie hinges on the lack of communication, and the white woman's translations, etc.)  I also remember really appreciating how much of The Godfathers is in Italian.
(Reminds me of how ludicrous the movie Broken Arrow (1950) was: everyone speaks in English in the movie. In the introduction, James Stewart's character narrates and says something like "everything in this story is true just as it happened, except that you'll hear everyone speaking English."  But part of the  character's ability to make peace with the Indians is his ability to speak their language!!! So he walks into their camp and starts talking to their chief, who remarks something like "I see you speak our language very well!" -- and all this is happening in English. So yeah, that was pretty ludicrous and made me actually laugh while watching that. Of course, numerous movies have characters speaking in English even though the movie involves people who in real life wouldn't speak English. But in a movie in which knowledge of the language is a part of the story itself, having the characters speak in their real language makes it much better.. Similarly, in The Godfathers, there is a deliberate contrast between America and Italy, so it is so much better that the scenes in which Italian would be spoken, are actually done in Italian).

Anyway, one big mistake they made with the Dances With Wolves blu ray disc (I don't know if the dvd has the same issue): you have to choose the subtitle option on the blu ray disc in order to see the subtitles, even when the Indians are speaking; I think they should have made the subtitles during the Indians' dialogue  come up automatically. (The subtitles translating the Indians' dialogue are yellow, while the subtitles of the words actually spoken in English (eg. Costner's dialogue) are white; so I guess the yellow ones were automatically on screen when the movie was released in theaters, while the white ones were added later for the home video release -- But both only come up when you choose the subtitle option).

The problem with having to choose the subtitle from the menu is that I only wanted to see the subtitles on the Indians' dialogue, but not on the English dialogue. So every time the scene shifted to and from the Indians' camp, I had to keep switching the subtitles on and off. Furthermore, since I always switched the subtitles on during the scenes with the Indians, the English that is spoken during those scenes (eg. by Costner) w came up subtitled on the screen also.
 If they had made the subtitles come up on the screen automatically whenever the Indians are speaking (as it is eg. in The Godfather Parts whenever they are speaking in Italian) then I would have never had to touch the subtitle button on the remote, and always had the Indians' dialogue subtitled and never the English dialogue, which is the way that I (and probably most other viewers) would have preferred it.

« Last Edit: March 29, 2012, 08:14:48 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #10324 on: March 31, 2012, 12:52:04 PM »

A Town Like Alice (1956) - 8/10. British women and children captured by the Japanese army in Malaysia are sent on what amounts to a death march because the Japanese have made no provision for female prisoners. I saw the TV version in the 80s with Bryan Brown, but Peter Finch (Network) makes a much better Australian. Virginia McKenna (Carve Her Name With Pride), the female lead, is also impressive, and I can see why Groggy ( fistful-of-leone.com ) is so smitten with her. This is one of those pictures that looks great despite the fact that the cast never left the environs of Pinewood Studios--second unit footage of Malaysia and Australia really sells the idea that the principals went on location. Anyway, this is something to watch while we await the (more factually scrupulous) Empire of the Sun Blu-ray.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10325 on: March 31, 2012, 01:08:19 PM »

When did I claim to be smitten with Virginia McKenna?

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #10326 on: March 31, 2012, 02:10:23 PM »

Sorry, I must have momentarily confused you with that Erickson guy.

Here's my amended sentence:
Quote
Virginia McKenna (Carve Her Name With Pride), the female lead, is also impressive, so I can't see why Groggy ( fistful-of-leone.com ) thinks she's complete dog food.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10327 on: March 31, 2012, 09:15:06 PM »

Not very flattering to him. Tongue

« Last Edit: March 31, 2012, 09:16:51 PM by Groggy » Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10328 on: March 31, 2012, 09:26:29 PM »

The Bounty - 8/10 - 2nd viewing. Without revisiting the '35 version this is probably my favorite Bounty film. The complex portrayal of Bligh earns it points; here he's a good sailor who loses control of his crew and overcompensates on the return voyage, which seems more plausible than the asshole explanation. Tahiti's hedonism is very well-conveyed, both through the langorous photography (and CJ's mythical "acres of breasts" Azn) and Vangelis's dreamlike score. Why would anyone want to leave? The final shots of Christian and Co. on Pitcairn are especially striking. The trial structure exists to paper over holes in the script (remember this was originally a David Lean super-epic) but work if only for Edward Fox's fun scenery-chewing. Anthony Hopkins is good as he's ever been; Mel Gibson mostly does well but overacts during the big scenes. Good to see Daniel Day-Lewis, Liam Neeson and Bernard Hill in "before they were famous" roles.

« Last Edit: March 31, 2012, 09:27:51 PM by Groggy » Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13635

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #10329 on: April 01, 2012, 10:08:28 AM »

The Mob (1951) 8/10. Broderick Crawford goes undercover to ferret out racketeers On The Waterfront. The story isn't anything special, but what makes this film really click is the snide dialog. There are two kinds of sarcasm in the picture: mild, for friends and co-workers; and acid, for everyone else. Crawford gets to spar with a host of tough-talkers--Richard Kiley, Borgnine, Neville Brand, and (uncredited!) Jay Adler as a surly hotel clerk (Adler: "Smoothie [the bartender] wants to see you. He's giving away free drinks." Crawford: "Yeah? Then why aren't you in there?") Even Mr. Buchinsky shows up as a longshoreman (with one line!). But the big revelation is Lynn Baggett playing a frisky good girl--she gives a (brief) performance you can feel in your shorts. (She's also in D.O.A.--her's is a tragic story, leading to suicide at age 36). The film's pace is just as snappy as its patter. I don't know how noir this film is, but it sure is entertaining.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for getting out of bed this morning.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12609


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #10330 on: April 01, 2012, 11:07:28 AM »

Nice to know Afro

I just re-watched Fear In The Night (1947) really crappy transfer on an Alpha DVD, low budget Woolrich material, though its nice seeing Deforest Kelly. 6/10

« Last Edit: April 01, 2012, 11:11:43 AM by cigar joe » Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
stanton
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2934



View Profile
« Reply #10331 on: April 01, 2012, 12:27:51 PM »

Letter from an Unknown Woman - Max Ophüls 1948  9,5/10


His Girl Friday - Howard Hawks 1940  8,5/10

The first 25 min are brilliant

Logged

Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10332 on: April 01, 2012, 01:56:50 PM »

His Girl Friday - Howard Hawks 1940  8,5/10

The first 25 min are brilliant

Implying the rest isn't? Huh

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10333 on: April 02, 2012, 01:37:19 PM »

Day off so...

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie - 8/10 - Worth watching if only as the anthesis of schmaltzy inspirational teacher flicks like Goodbye, Mr. Chips and Dead Poets Society. Here were get an "unconventional," "inspirational" teacher who encourages "free thought," which in her warped mind means promiscuity, cliquishness, impulsive idealism and adherence to Fascism. Maggie Smith is superb as a character who becomes more loathsome as the film goes along. Celia Johnson has a meaty supporting role too. The final scene between Smith and Pamela Franklin is very on-the-nose but that's a minor demerit.

Rob Roy - 8/10 - Largely the anti-Bravehart, aside from the similarly melodramatic villains. Top-shelf historical drama with beautiful photography, gritty violence and a slow-burning story that takes its time developing. No big battles like the Gibson movie, just a few modest action scenes and an excellent swordfight at the end. Liam Neeson's never been better and he's backed by one hell of a supporting cast: Tim Roth is definitely one of the nastiest baddies out there with John Hurt, Andrew Keir and Brian Cox as bench support. Very good.

Not a bad day. Afro

« Last Edit: April 02, 2012, 01:46:41 PM by Groggy » Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8313

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #10334 on: April 02, 2012, 01:59:04 PM »

Dead End (1937) 9/10

Plot Synopsis: The Dead End Kids, an unemployed architect, gangster Baby Face Martin, and other characters across different socio-economic circles interact with an East Side neighborhood over one day and night.

Cast (courtesy of imdb)

Sylvia Sidney    ...   Drina
    Joel McCrea    ...   Dave
    Humphrey Bogart    ...   'Baby Face' Martin
    Wendy Barrie    ...   Kay
    Claire Trevor    ...   Francey
    
and the "Dead End kids."

This movie takes place in one shitty studio "street," standing in for the East Side. The movie focuses on the socially-conscious stuff, poor people growing up in tenements, leading to crime, and interacting with people from other classes. (Unlike some of the movies of that era which were gangster films that peripherally dealt with the social issues, this movie -- from Samuel Goldwyn Productions -- is much more socially conscious, with peripheral gangster stuff.

This is the first movie featuring the "Dead End" kids. (As you can tell from the single street staging, it was adapted from a play). Directed by William Wyler, it's just a wonderful watch.

Sylvia Sidney was simply amazing as the lead actress. (I can't believe she wasn't eben nominated for an Oscar). I haven't being this amazed by an actress in a long time.

 I was surprised that Claire Trevor was nominated for Best Supporting Actress; not that she was bad, but all she had was a single scene -- for 5 minutes or so. The movie had 3 other Oscar nominations: for Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography, and Best Picture (it did not win any of the 4 nominations).

The picture quality is good. The movie is available on eBay for just a few bucks, on a region-free Korean dvd. I highly recommend the purchase   Afro Afro

« Last Edit: April 02, 2012, 02:42:41 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Pages: 1 ... 687 688 [689] 690 691 ... 1162 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.061 seconds with 20 queries.