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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1833658 times)
Groggy
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« Reply #10335 on: April 03, 2012, 04:40:17 AM »

Ebert has a valid point in that the trial becomes more prominent than the childhood sections in the film. Of course it would, it's more cinematic. That's the criticism, though I think it's a bit overdone. Nothing to do with "not being liberal enough."

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« Reply #10336 on: April 03, 2012, 04:53:05 AM »

Ebert has a valid point in that the trial becomes more prominent than the childhood sections in the film. Of course it would, it's more cinematic. That's the criticism, though I think it's a bit overdone. Nothing to do with "not being liberal enough."

The point of the movie, as I said, is Scout observing her father's courageous actions. Now, of course, the most courageous of them all -- and the one that teaches her the biggest lesson -- is the trial. Therefore, the trial gets the most focus, more than eg. the shooting of the wild dog, or the other kind and courageous actions he did. But it doesn't change the fact that all these experiences by Atticus, -- including the trial --  and all the actions he takes in them, are only important insofar as Scout witnesses them. (And if Scout had not snuck into the courtroom, then the trial wouldn't have been shown at all, no matter how important it was in real life; imagine what Ebert would have said to that  Grin)

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« Reply #10337 on: April 03, 2012, 02:51:24 PM »

Did you know that the character of Dill is purportedly based upon Truman Capote, who had been a childhood friend of Harper Lee when he was sent to live with relatives in Lee's hometown each summer. Truman Capote, in turn, based one of his characters in his literary work "Other Voices, Other Rooms" upon his recollection of Harper Lee.

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« Reply #10338 on: April 03, 2012, 03:06:06 PM »

Did you know that the character of Dill is purportedly based upon Truman Capote, who had been a childhood friend of Harper Lee when he was sent to live with relatives in Lee's hometown each summer. Truman Capote, in turn, based one of his characters in his literary work "Other Voices, Other Rooms" upon his recollection of Harper Lee.

did Capote wear high black socks and sandals as a kid too?  Wink

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« Reply #10339 on: April 03, 2012, 03:22:55 PM »

did Capote wear high black socks and sandals as a kid too?  Wink

Probably he did look a bit weird ;-)

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« Reply #10340 on: April 03, 2012, 03:27:56 PM »

The point of the movie, as I said, is Scout observing her father's courageous actions. Now, of course, the most courageous of them all -- and the one that teaches her the biggest lesson -- is the trial. Therefore, the trial gets the most focus, more than eg. the shooting of the wild dog, or the other kind and courageous actions he did.

Thank you.

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« Reply #10341 on: April 03, 2012, 03:39:18 PM »

Thank you.

I'm not sure what that mean, but I'll take it  Wink

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« Reply #10342 on: April 03, 2012, 03:43:19 PM »

Probably he did look a bit weird ;-)

That kid who plays Dill is a bit too self-conscious as an actor; he sounds as if he is acting, like he is reading his lines from a script; they don't come naturally. (His dorkiness does kind of fit with the high black socks and sandals, which btw stay the same between 2 summers; I just hope he changed the socks  Wink) The kids who played Jem and Scout sound much more natural and were terrific. But IMO Jem was better; there are quite a few times where you can see Scout giggling, or trying her best not to; Jem was absolutely perfect. I really can't believe Scout would get an Oscar nomination but not Jem (then again, I didn't see all the other performances of 1962, so I really can't judge it against the competition).

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« Reply #10343 on: April 04, 2012, 08:33:25 AM »

Two with Lyle Bettger, the New Swine Find of 1950.

Union Station (1950) 6/10. Lyle's got a plan: kidnap a blind heiress and shake down her old man for $100,000. His only mistake: choosing Union Station as his frequent rendevous point, the province of one William Holden, railroad cop! Bill is soon on the case, thanks to sharp-eyed Nancy Olsen who notices Lyle carrying iron and acting suspicious. In this town the railroad police seem to be a division of the city cops, so Barry Fitzgerald quickly arrives with reinforcements (the exact setting is obscured, but it could be Chicago--there's one unintentionally funny sequence where a baddie is stampeded to death in a stockyard!). Jan Sterling is in the picture, as Lyle's moll, but when she becomes a liability, Lyle unceremoniously kicks her to the curb--literally. Then there's the exciting final chase, beneath the station, through the power generating plant, down the airshaft, into the "city tunnel" (a well-lit soundstage). Wounded, on the run, clutching a bag with his ill-gotten gains, Lyle is oblivious when the lid pops and money starts pouring out (Were you watching, Stanley?). The message of the film is clear: don't mess with Railroad Cop!

No Man of Her Own (1950) 10/10. Not really a noir--call it a woman's picture with noir trimmings. Barbara Stanwyck is in NY, broke, pregnant, and jilted by Lyle Bettger. Lyle's all heart: he buys her a rail ticket back to San Francisco. Turns out to be the best thing he could have done, though. On the train she meets a kind couple her own age who are also expecting, and when the train crashes and the couple are killed, Barbara is mistakenly identified as the dead man's wife. Turns out the guy was from money, and since the family hadn't yet met the wife, it's easy for Barbara to go on pretending she's the mother of the family's heir. She's no grifter, though; Barbara is doing it for da chile. Her new brother-in-law (John Lund in Handsome-Block-of-Wood mode) has his suspicions, but he soon succumbs to Barbara's charms. Things are going swimmingly--and then Bad Penny Lyle turns up. It's not long before several people have a motive for murder. Referring to Lyle at the end, a police detective remarks, "He must have been quite a guy. Everyone who knew him wanted him dead." The rock-solid plot is derived from a novel by William Irish (Cornell Woolrich).

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« Reply #10344 on: April 04, 2012, 10:04:26 AM »

Thanks for the reviews Jinks. I've been hearing good things about No Man of Her Own; Savant had a glowing review of it not long ago.

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« Reply #10345 on: April 04, 2012, 11:45:17 AM »

Yeah, he tipped me to it as well.

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« Reply #10346 on: April 05, 2012, 07:14:42 AM »

Rage in Heaven (1941) - 7/10. Ingrid Bergman has a choice between marrying kind, stalwart George Sanders or psychotic Robert Montgomery--and she chooses Montgomery! Montgomery can't forgive the fact that George and Ingrid were attracted to each other, however, so he contrives their ruin. Piling up the circumstantial evidence, Montgomery commits suicide (hey, I said he was psycho) in such a way as to cause the blame to fall on Sanders. Convicted and awaiting execution as the clock ticks, George must rely on Ingrid and Oscar Homolka (as a French headshrinker!) to find proof of his innocence. From a novel by James Hilton.

Grand Central Murder (1941) - 7/10. A gold-digging Broadway star is murdered in a private railroad car, and the suspects are this deep. Inspector Sam Levene assembles such usual suspects as Van Heflin, Virginia Grey, Tom Conway (George Sanders' brother) and "Horace" McNally(in his pre-Stephen billing). In flashbacks, the suspects recount their parts in the events leading up to the Event. There is a clever variation on the locked-room puzzle, using an ingenious method of murder that isn't revealed until the end. This is one of those jokey murder mysteries where nothing is taken too seriously, even the deaths of the characters. Entertaining.

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« Reply #10347 on: April 05, 2012, 09:54:45 AM »

GOON (2011)

I just saw this movie in a theater: it's a comedy about enforcers in hockey (the guys whose job it is to fight to protect the skill players on their team from being pushed around by the other team). For some reason, I was under the false impression that it was a serious documentary-type story; in fact, it is nothing but a dumbass comedy with ridiculous potty humor. (What should I have expected from a movie featuring Jason Biggs's dad and Stifler from American Pie?)

Interesting thing is that the issue of enforcers/fighting in hockey is an important current issue, as the roles of enforcers and fighting are now being questioned do to concerns over concussions, and the deaths of three enforcers last summer, two by suicide, and one (Derek Boogard of my New York Rangers) by overdose of oxycodone and alcohol. Makes it all the more strange that one of the characters in the movie (the goalie) is hooked on Percocet, in a comedic way. You wonder if they should have reconsidered certain parts of the movie, in light of recent sad events...

This movie is a complete waste of time. I wonder why Liev Schreiber would take a supporting acting role in it; hasn't he been getting good roles?

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« Reply #10348 on: April 05, 2012, 12:52:16 PM »

Johnny Eager (1941) - 6/10. A district attorney's daughter (Lana Turner) falls for a block of wood (Robert Taylor)  who the D.A. is trying to put in jail. Said block begins by manipulating the daughter to get to her old man, but finally feels love's touch himself at the point of dying. Van Heflin plays a literate lush, the gangster's friend and conscience. Turner is incandescent (but disappears from the middle of the picture), Heflin is very, very good, and Taylor does his usual thing. This works well at the beginning when his character is supposed to be cold and unfeeling, not so well later when he's supposed to grow a heart and start emoting (the glycerin tears don't help). Some good lines, but the interesting premise is squandered on a rather aimless plot.

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« Reply #10349 on: April 05, 2012, 02:44:36 PM »

The Damned Don't Cry (1950) Ok meller starring Joan Crawford who is not bad in it 6.5/10 .

Strorm Warning (1950) This one was better in the Noir department and much darker, though it had a very "un-dark" cast, Ronald Reagan, Ginger Rodgers, and Doris Day?, lol the subject was The KKK too. If it had had a normal Noir cast and a more believable ending. . . who knows. ;-) 6/10

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