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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1767428 times)
Groggy
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« Reply #10620 on: June 24, 2012, 08:37:26 PM »

Quiz Show - 8/10 - Not as profound or insightful as it thinks it is but a good high class drama with an intellectual kick. The main appeal is an incredible cast: Ralph Fiennes, John Turturro, David Paymer, Mira Sorvino and the incomparable Paul Scofield. Rob Morrow's excellent too; whatever happened to the guy?

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« Reply #10621 on: June 25, 2012, 04:54:05 PM »

I think Rushmore is pretty great. It's actually connected to the real world at points. The fantasy world of MK is entertaining, but so hermetic as to be irrelevant for practical use.
If not MK, then Rushmore is definitely the best. It's Wes Anderson's only movie where I don't think he goes overboard with his own style (and Bottle Rocket too, but I just don't think that its as good as the rest in general). I love the small-scale adventure feel of MK though.

I Live In Fear
Kurosawa is just really fucking great.

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« Reply #10622 on: June 25, 2012, 05:40:48 PM »

I Live In Fear
Kurosawa is just really fucking great.
Now yer talkin'. Afro

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« Reply #10623 on: June 26, 2012, 09:56:22 AM »



Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter (2012) -3/10. [Yes, that's a minus 3]. I expected to hate this based on the title, I just hadn't imagined how much. It turns out that winning the Civil War and freeing the slaves was the least of Honest Abe's accomplishments. He's also responsible for, get this, ensuring that ours would be a nation of men and women rather than vampires. I was willing to go along with the premise so long as we were dealing with the Young Lincoln, but once the story moved to Lincoln in the White House it was all I could do to keep the dry heaves down. We see Jefferson Davis conspiring with the vampire leader to provide undead soldiers for the Confederate cause (the filmmakers are complete bastards). When Lincoln gets the battle losses (in real time) for the "first day of Gettysburg" he knows just what to do. In a single afternoon he collects all the silver in D.C., has it melted down into rifle balls, then shipped over night to the battle. Apparently there's a train line that runs directly from the capital to Gettysburg. And knowing that evil vampire minions will attempt to interdict the train, Abe and his team of vampire slayers ride along. The predictable battle royal then commences--ending in a coflagration atop the largest train trestle CGI could produce--but, hold on, the silver wasn't on the train after all, it was just a decoy! The real cargo got to Gettysburg via an alternate route. As Abe says with a wink, "This is not the only railroad." See, the silver was carried over night the 80 miles from D.C. to Gettysburg on the Underground Railroad!!! This is not the first film to make a travesty of historical fact. But this movie is something that actually approaches a kind of blasphemy. It is not enough that this film fail and lose money. The people involved in its making need to be hunted down and beheaded and have wooden stakes pounded through their hearts. And that's just for starters.

I just happened to notice that your favorite movie critic gave this 3 out of 4 stars  http://rogerebert.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20120620/REVIEWS/120629989 Grin

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« Reply #10624 on: June 26, 2012, 11:33:20 AM »

A vampire like Ebert would natrually incline to a film about his own kind.

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« Reply #10625 on: June 26, 2012, 12:07:27 PM »

Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter sounds like a movie from the 1970īs

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« Reply #10626 on: June 26, 2012, 11:33:35 PM »

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0022436/

Street Scene (1931)

In honor of the beginning of summer, TCM is showing a bunch of summer movies. This one is based on a Pulitizer Prize-winning play, produced by Sam Goldwyn and directed by King Vidior, Sylvia Sidney and William Collier, Jr.

The story takes place over the course of a couple of a night and a day on a blazing hot summer in New York, everyone just hangs out on the stoop of the tenement, so we learn about their lives, of course you have every stereotype of immigrant group, the ladies blabbing to each other, everyone butting into each others' business,etc., his is a "socially-conscious movie." One of the main story lines involves some very un-euphemized philandering going on, I am sure that that would never have been allowed once the Production Code began to be enforced in 1934. (As film historians will always remind you, the Code was in place before '34, but wasn't enforced until then. So RE: the period from "30-"34 it's inaccurate to say "pre-Code days,"; the correct term is "pre-Code Enforcement days"  Wink)


There is a scene involving a philandering wife that ultimately ends up on the front page of a newspaper. We see two women standing in front of the building, looking at a newspaper with a cartoon drawing of the very building they are standing in front of. I am sure that this shot influenced the famous shot from Citizen Kane where Kane leaves the building of Susan Alexander, and suddenly the building turns into a photograph of the building on the front page of a newspaper.

One of the story lines involves a poor family of a mother and two children being evicted from then building; I am not 100% surem but I think it's just the mother and two small kids, I guess the father must have died. Remember that Sergio Leone believed that the The Hoods was a subconscious re-write of gangster movies. This is definitely not a gangster movie, but in The Hoods, the young Noodles's family is evicted from their apartment. Noodles's father died when Noodles was young, though I do not remember for sure whether it's before or after they were evicted. I wonder if Grey stole this scene for The Hoods? In The Hoods, it's played out more elaborately, with the furniture being carried out into the street and Noodles crying and begging the men not to evict them. In Street Scene, we just see it being discussed how they will be evicted, and we then see two men arrive to carry out the eviction, but we don't see anything else, we don't actually see it being carried out. I guess this was a common enough occurrence that we can't necessarily say that The Hoods took it from this movie, but anything is possible.

Eight years after this movie was made, Goldwyn produced Dead End -- another movie that was based on a play and featured a leading performance by Sylvia Sidney, which is also a socially-conscious movie involving a street scene on a hot summer in New York that takes place over a day and a night, (Humphrey Bogart plays a gangster in that one). The two are definitely reminiscent, although we can see a great improvement in Sidney's performance over the course of 8 years. In Dead End, she delivers what IMO is one of the greatest performances ever by a female lead. In Street Scene, (she is only 21 years old), her performance is merely adequate, and she has short hair and a lisp. Thankfully, her hair was long by the time of Dead End  Afro

This movie is very interesting as a piece of history. The days before common folk had air conditioning, when all they could do on a hot summer day to escape the sweltering apartment was sit out on the stoop, eating ice cream and yapping about each other's lives. Check it out next time it plays on TCM  Afro

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« Reply #10627 on: June 27, 2012, 03:16:53 AM »

saw it too. One extra to mention is that it has as its score "Street Scene" a tune that was almost as a leitmotif for New York City, and was used in a number of Noir's

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« Reply #10628 on: June 27, 2012, 03:40:19 AM »

The Grifters (1990) Director: Stephen Frears, Writers: Jim Thompson (novel), Donald E. Westlake (screenplay), Stars: Anjelica Huston, John Cusack and Annette Bening as three "grifters" con artists, who intertwine in neo noirsville. Its a great film, a classic Noir/Pulp Fiction tale but still I think it would have looked better if it had been kept in its early 1960 time period and if it had been shot in a stylistic B&W, contemporary 90's and color detracts, but again that is me  Wink. Frears shows some inkling style but not quite enough to wow you. 8/10

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« Reply #10629 on: June 27, 2012, 04:44:38 AM »

Freers and style are antipodes.

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« Reply #10630 on: June 27, 2012, 08:03:55 AM »

saw it too. One extra to mention is that it has as its score "Street Scene" a tune that was almost as a leitmotif for New York City, and was used in a number of Noir's

also most of the film were close-up shots of the stoop, so I assumed it was a set, but on a few rare occasions they pulled back to a wide shot and you see what looks like a real street in New York with the elevated train. So I assumed that maybe they did a few of the wide shots on a real street, but re-created the stoop on a set from the 90% of the movie where it is shown in closeup. Then, after the movie, Robert Osborne said that King Vidor built two identical stoops on the set, in order to save time so that while they are arranging the lighting on one, they could be shooting on the other. Osborne didn't mention anything about doing any shots on the street. But during those few times the camera pulls back to wide shot, it definitely looks like a New York City street. if that's a set, it is a damn good one. Looks like a real elevated train station. Any thoughts on that, cj?

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« Reply #10631 on: June 27, 2012, 10:04:25 AM »

I see someone posted the full STREET SCENE (1931) to YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3xn8untdr4&feature=fvwrel
The part with the newspaper photo that IMO inspired a similar shot in Citizen Kane is at 1:03:49

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« Reply #10632 on: June 27, 2012, 11:36:24 AM »

Freers and style are antipodes.

Not in his early films, before he went to Hollywood

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« Reply #10633 on: June 27, 2012, 01:14:29 PM »

Two films about bands of men trying to survive in the wild.

Garden of Evil (1954) - 8/10. Susan Hayward leads 4 men to their death, but it really isn't her fault. It's those pesky Apaches'! The cast includes Coop as the Strong Silent Type, Widmark as the world-weary Gambler, Cam Mitchell as the Young Punk, some Mexican guy as The Mexican Guy, and Hugh Marlowe as the Injured Husband. The stunning Mexican locations in Cinemascope are stunningly stunning. Even so, if you watch the film with the sound turned off it seems a dull affair. But turn on Benny Herrmann's amazing score--the only one he did for a Western--and you are transported to a world as strange as that of Barsoom.

Deliverance (1972) - 7/10. Four Georgia businessmen spend a pleasant weekend canoeing down an inaccessible river (played by the Chattanooga). The cast includes Burt Reynolds as The Survivalist, John Voight as the Audience's Surrogate, Ned Beatty as the Loudmouth Asshole, and Ronny Cox as The Accountant. Bill McKinney shows up in two parts: first as a really really depraved Mountain Man, then later as The World's Most Convincing Corpse (he can play dead in long takes with his eyes open). This film dares to ask the question, Can a modern urban male--insulated as he is from the natural world--kill when occasion demands? The answer is a reassuring "Boy, howdy!" Cinematography in this picture is to die for, and if you turn the sound off you can skip the annoying Bluegrass music. CJ, remember when "Dueling Banjos" was on Top 40 radio every single damn day? After 40 years I can finally stand to listen to it, but only just.

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« Reply #10634 on: June 27, 2012, 03:11:01 PM »

Two films about bands of men trying to survive in the wild.

Garden of Evil (1954) - 8/10. Susan Hayward leads 4 men to their death, but it really isn't her fault. It's those pesky Apaches'! The cast includes Coop as the Strong Silent Type, Widmark as the world-weary Gambler, Cam Mitchell as the Young Punk, some Mexican guy as The Mexican Guy, and Hugh Marlowe as the Injured Husband. The stunning Mexican locations in Cinemascope are stunningly stunning. Even so, if you watch the film with the sound turned off it seems a dull affair. But turn on Benny Herrmann's amazing score--the only one he did for a Western--and you are transported to a world as strange as that of Barsoom.


The Tomahawk style hair is really out of place in this film for Apaches, looks like they used extras from Last Of The Mohicans, really stupid mistake, lol

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