Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 14, 2017, 09:40:16 PM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 6 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 713 714 [715] 716 717 ... 1170 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1837227 times)
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #10710 on: July 09, 2012, 10:00:04 PM »

A Face in the Crowd (1957)

For some reason I am having a big internal debate on how to rate this; I'm gonna go with an 8/10, though I couldn't argue if you went higher. (It takes guts to rate films, unlike certain  people cough-cough who start a rating system and then run away from it!)

Somehow, I felt there was something missing in Andy Griffith's performance. Patricia Neal was perfect in her role, although I'm not sure how convincing it is that her character would fall that hard for Griffith's; but maybe that's just because we see Griffith from a more objective perspective than does Neal (which is always the case when someone is in love). This movie was definitely an inspiration for Network (1976), and both movies perhaps seek to do too much at once. (And IMO, AFITC was probably influenced somewhat by the previous year's Giant, specifically for the scene where Griffith is speaking to an empty audience....Matthau is terrific as always. and I simply must re-emphasize how spectacular Neal was...

SPOILER ALERT

Yeah, the the rags-to-riches-to-arrogance-to-insanity plotline is probably one of the most familiar in Hollywood. But doing something doesn't always equal doing it well, and this one was done well. Despite some possible contrived-ness, this is a very enjoyable watch.

« Last Edit: July 09, 2012, 10:03:38 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12783


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #10711 on: July 10, 2012, 02:25:36 AM »

A Face in the Crowd (1957)

For some reason I am having a big internal debate on how to rate this; I'm gonna go with an 8/10, though I couldn't argue if you went higher. (It takes guts to rate films, unlike certain  people cough-cough who start a rating system and then run away from it!)

Somehow, I felt there was something missing in Andy Griffith's performance. Patricia Neal was perfect in her role, although I'm not sure how convincing it is that her character would fall that hard for Griffith's; but maybe that's just because we see Griffith from a more objective perspective than does Neal (which is always the case when someone is in love). This movie was definitely an inspiration for Network (1976), and both movies perhaps seek to do too much at once. (And IMO, AFITC was probably influenced somewhat by the previous year's Giant, specifically for the scene where Griffith is speaking to an empty audience....Matthau is terrific as always. and I simply must re-emphasize how spectacular Neal was...

SPOILER ALERT

Yeah, the the rags-to-riches-to-arrogance-to-insanity plotline is probably one of the most familiar in Hollywood. But doing something doesn't always equal doing it well, and this one was done well. Despite some possible contrived-ness, this is a very enjoyable watch.

Its one I consider a Near Noir, I believe its based somewhat on early radio/TV personality Aurthur Godfrey : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Godfrey

Any way you forgot to mention it was Lee Remick's debut film, but the rating is spot on.

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #10712 on: July 10, 2012, 06:11:59 AM »

Its one I consider a Near Noir, I believe its based somewhat on early radio/TV personality Aurthur Godfrey : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Godfrey

Any way you forgot to mention it was Lee Remick's debut film, but the rating is spot on.

I guess you can consider Griffith similar to a noir character (a basically good guy who gets caught up in something and becomes bad), but there is no noir stylistics, and this is not a crime drama!

I was not aware that it was Remick's first film. I've always loved her, the most distinct eyes in Hollywood history! She'll always be remembered as THE PANTIES GIRL from Anatomy of a Murder -- wtf was that word considered so funny, with the whole courtroom laughing like little children? (and btw those panties from the 50's were bigger than the basketball shorts of the time!)

« Last Edit: July 10, 2012, 02:21:09 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Jill
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 989

This time I did


View Profile
« Reply #10713 on: July 10, 2012, 07:28:31 AM »

Groggy: the most recent, it's on BBC right now. They made a tetralogy with Richard II, Henry IV 1-2. and Henry V. Every Saturday. Good stuff. The best British actors are almost all in, which, naturally, means half the adult cast of HP/Game of Thrones. Cheesy


Logged

"Does this unit have a soul?"
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10714 on: July 10, 2012, 10:07:09 AM »

Cool.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13706

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #10715 on: July 10, 2012, 03:20:46 PM »

Kings of the Road
Unlike The American Friend (ZZzzzzz), a much closer step toward the greatness of Wenders' Wings of Desire and Paris, Texas. Although I think it could benefit from a slightly more conventional structure (don't ask me how, because I have no idea), it's a criminally under-seen film.
This came out before The American Friend, so if Kings of the Road is a step toward the films you mention, then the path goes through TAF also. It also goes through The State of Things (1982), which you should see if you haven't already.

I don't understand why you don't like TAF. The train killings alone are worth the price of admission.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
PowerRR
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3008


View Profile
« Reply #10716 on: July 10, 2012, 08:41:54 PM »

This came out before The American Friend, so if Kings of the Road is a step toward the films you mention, then the path goes through TAF also. It also goes through The State of Things (1982), which you should see if you haven't already.

I don't understand why you don't like TAF. The train killings alone are worth the price of admission.
I mean quality-wise (IMO), not chronologically. The State of Things and Alice in the Cities will be my next two I want to check out. I'm also interested in Pina considering its his most recent work and I've heard so many great things.

The American Friend just bored the shit out of me after a while. Granted, a second viewing is definitely necessary now that I have an understanding of what to expect out of it. The same goes for Kings of the Road, which I'm sure I missed a lot of its meaning on my first viewing.

Logged
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13706

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #10717 on: July 11, 2012, 09:48:10 AM »

Flowers of War (2011) - 6/10. During the Rape of Nanjing, Chinese convent girls are menaced by Imperial Japanese soldiers. Christian Bale, as a phony priest, and a stable of hookers--the "flowers"--help the girls out. Such a simple tale should have been quickly told, but Zhang Yimou takes a cinematic eternity (146 minutes). No doubt he wanted to give all the new talent on display a chance to spread their, er, petals and be recognized. (Zhang is a great one for female star-making). I liked the way he handled the three languages in the picture: the Chinese speak Chinese amongst themselves, the Japanese Japanese; both groups use English when talking to Bale and sometimes when the Chinese speak to the Japanese. Everybody's English knowledge is a little too good for 1937--and Bale sounds like he arrived in Nanjing from 2012--but it was a refreshing way to stay true to the polyglot realities of the situation and still get the story across.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10718 on: July 11, 2012, 08:13:53 PM »

All Night Long (1962) - 7/10 - Othello, Jazz style: drummer Patrick McGoohan wants to start his own band, and tries to break up leader Paul Harris and singer Marti Stevens for his own purposes. Compact, claustrophobic little drama that doesn't take its Shakespeare plot the whole way. Jazz fans will get a kick out of the score, not to mention cameos by David Brubeck, Keith Christie, Tubby Hayes and others.

« Last Edit: July 12, 2012, 03:29:24 PM by Groggy » Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
sargatanas
Gunslinger
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 283


View Profile
« Reply #10719 on: July 13, 2012, 03:57:57 PM »

All Night Long (1962) - 7/10 - Othello, Jazz style: drummer Patrick McGoohan wants to start his own band, and tries to break up leader Paul Harris and singer Marti Stevens for his own purposes. Compact, claustrophobic little drama that doesn't take its Shakespeare plot the whole way. Jazz fans will get a kick out of the score, not to mention cameos by David Brubeck, Keith Christie, Tubby Hayes and others.

 Afro

Logged
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12783


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #10720 on: July 13, 2012, 06:44:05 PM »

Screaming Mimi (1958) 5/10 a watered down version of the book regardless of having Anita Ekberg and Gypsy Rose Lee in the cast.

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10721 on: July 13, 2012, 09:15:46 PM »

Safe House - 6/10 - A poor man's Three Days of the Condor, a spy flick where nobody/nothing is at it seems etc. Not bad, just predictable.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #10722 on: July 14, 2012, 07:55:13 PM »

Safe House - 6/10 - A poor man's Three Days of the Condor, a spy flick where nobody/nothing is at it seems etc. Not bad, just predictable.

I saw this in the theater. I give it about the same rating. Starts out interesting, seems like great potential, but I liked it less as time went on. Gets a bit ludicrous at times, like the idea that the young CIA guy would actually be expected to go to a soccer stadium with Denzel. Also, while I loved the editing of the opening shootout in the big square, I hated the editing of all the action sequences after that; gave me a headache.

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10723 on: July 15, 2012, 08:28:42 AM »

You're right. Every twist was bleeding obvious (anyone not guess one of the three bigwigs was a traitor?) and that Ryan and Denzel would bond as the story went along? All the crap with Reynolds' girlfriend was a bit much, too, especially the "happy" ending.

The style didn't bother me if only because I've become innured to it. But yeah, shaky cam *and* lens flairs was a bit much.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #10724 on: July 15, 2012, 09:51:01 AM »

You're right. Every twist was bleeding obvious (anyone not guess one of the three bigwigs was a traitor?) and that Ryan and Denzel would bond as the story went along? All the crap with Reynolds' girlfriend was a bit much, too, especially the "happy" ending.

The style didn't bother me if only because I've become innured to it. But yeah, shaky cam *and* lens flairs was a bit much.

I feel like the opening shootout had the perfect combination of long shots to establish where each of the players were in relation to each other, and closeups to get the feel of being in the crowd. But later action scenes got rid of the long shots and went only with those close tight shots, like to make you feel you are there IN the car. That had the effect of completely making the viewer lose perspective, and give him a major headache. I remember the same thing with tha chase through the slums. I felt like vomiting, was like on a roller coaster.... I wish they had edited all the action sequences the same way as the opening shootout.

SPOILER ALERT

I guess you have to re-think all the implausibilities once you know the ending. If the terrorists were really working for the CIA all along, that may make some of the implausibilities less implausible (I can't work it out exactly now cuz I saw the movie a while ago. But I remember rolling my eyes through much of  it, then wondering at the end if maybe it wasn't that implausible, and then wondering if it mattered at all....) So literally ANYONE CAN BE WORKING FOR ANYONE? okay. it may be not an important enough movie for me to worry about anyway.

-- Do you think the filmmakers here trying to make a particular (typical) political point, that you never know who is working for whom, how America often, for better or worse, allies with certain people/organizations to achieve certain  foreign policy goals? Or were they simply using current events as the basis of a movie, with no particular political agenda?

Anyway, I was disappointed with this movie, (and not only cuz of the editing of the action sequences). it's a shame cuz I think it was based on decent material. Denzel is one of my favorite actors ever, and he did not disappoint here. (Training Day was famous as his one real bad guy role; well here is another).  I think this material -- with some changes, in capable hands -- could be the basis for a good movie. (in Hollywood's Golden Era, movies were re-made in pretty quick succession,  eg. Frontier Marshal ('34 and '39), Destry Rides Again ('32 and '39), and all the Maltese Falcons. So it's not too soon for a re-make.  Wink )

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Pages: 1 ... 713 714 [715] 716 717 ... 1170 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.053 seconds with 20 queries.