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Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1759111 times)
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« Reply #10980 on: October 06, 2012, 09:00:50 PM »

Maybe, but there's no reason to let that spoil one's enjoyment of the film. Just enjoy the characters, it's as simple as that.
It doesn't spoil the enjoyment for me one bit. I loved and enjoyed every damn second of it. But there's a hell of a lot to think about when it's all over.

The Celebration - 7.5/10
Disturbing Danish Dogme 95 movie. It's good.

The Master - 10/10
Even more incredible on the second viewing. Fantastic 'buddy' movie / thematically ambiguous thought-provoking masterpiece (though much less ambiguous on a repeat viewing). One of the best movies made in years. It's a "light" 10 for PTA though - it doesn't match up to my love for Boogie Nights or Magnolia.

The Avengers - 4/10
Kudos to whoever decided to make a movie involving a BUNCH OF BAD-ASS SUPERHEROES and make every character/the whole movie as boring, generic, and uninteresting as possible. Please take some lessons from X-Men: First Class.

« Last Edit: October 06, 2012, 09:18:12 PM by rrpower » Logged
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« Reply #10981 on: October 07, 2012, 04:55:03 PM »

Warlock - 7/10 - 2nd viewing. A typical '50s adult Western with lots of talk, morally ambiguous protagonists and psychosexual complications. It's very tempting to read the film as a deconstruction of the Wyatt Earp legend with Henry Fonda as an unscrupulous Wyatt and Anthony Quinn as a backshooting, possibly gay Doc. Good cast and beautiful photography but the story sputters out before the final reels. Quinn's freakout is overwrought, to say the least. I did like the aborted showdown at the end though.


« Last Edit: October 08, 2012, 10:29:26 AM by Groggy » Logged


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« Reply #10982 on: October 09, 2012, 08:54:03 AM »

The Paperboy (2012) 7/10. The adventures of Southern White Trash, circa 1969. There's a story about a man on death row for a killing he didn't do, but that's something of a MacGuffin, it's just there to get the plot moving. Mostly, people just act white and trashy. And Southern. To that end, all the characters have accents: Scott Glenn has an accent, Mathew McConaughey has an accent, John Cusack has an accent, Nicole Kidman has an accent and a wig. Zac Efron, the film's lead, doesn't have an accent: this may mean that his character is supposed to be IN the South but not OF it; or it might mean that Zac just couldn't be bothered. Anyway, most of the interest in the film is about whether Zac is going to get to fulfill his MILF fantasies with Nicole or not. (Nope, no spoilers this time, sorry). There's a lot of artsy-fartsy photography in this one--images superimposed on others for no real reason; pre-steadycam hand-held work done by a spastic, that sort of thing. This tends to put the material at a distance, makes it less engaging, which is a good thing when we get to things like the urination scene or the part where the gator's entrails are exposed in close ups. Oops, I DID add spoilers after all. Man, I just can't seem to help myself.

« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 08:55:29 AM by dave jenkins » Logged


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« Reply #10983 on: October 09, 2012, 08:46:37 PM »

Actually, there is no way to know for sure what Michael was talking about. The only fact is that the ambiguity is lost for Patricia because of Vital.

also, the English title "Breathless" really misses the point of the French title A BOUT DE SOUFFLE, doesn't that mean something like "At the End of Breath"? I don't think it would have been that awkward to use that literal translation for the American title.




Also, I was just looking at Beaver's  screencap comparisons of the various (6!) versions of Breathless http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/dvdcompare/breathless.htm

if you don't want to compare all 6 versions, but just the two Blu Ray versions, then you can scroll to the bottom of the page, where there are comparisons of the Optimum/Kinowelt Region-Free Blu Ray vs. the Criterion Region A Blu Ray. (I am not sure of the technical terminology), but it looks like the  Criterion is "grayer," while the Optimum is sharper blacks, like any item that is black will be a much darker black in the Optimum, and the Criterion tones are more muted.

If I am going to buy the blu ray, which image do y'all prefer? (Of course, there are other important factors besides image; eg. bonus features and subtitles -- Beaver says the Criterion subtitles are far better, which is very important for a foreign-language film. But I am just wondering what your opinion is of the image comparisons?

« Last Edit: October 10, 2012, 02:10:08 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

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« Reply #10984 on: October 10, 2012, 01:10:26 AM »

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0027652/

Fury (1936) 5.5/10

What a shitty movie. Took a story that had good potential but did it all wrong.

This post contains spoilers

The first half is pretty bad. I only stuck with it cuz I'd heard some good things about it. The montage seqiuences with all the townfolk yapping to each other about the arrest is excruciating. Anyway, it only starts getting good once Tracy rises from the dead and starts planning his revenge. But starting from when his brothers and Sylvia Sidney's start begging him to change, it gets real bad, especially that speech Sydney gives. Anyway, once Tracy walks into the courtroom at the end, that's a scene with great potential, for him to give  a really awesome speech; but sadly, that's interrupted after a few seconds when Sidney says "I will marry you" and the movie ends on that kiss, as if this were a conventional love story.

UUGGGGHHHHHHH.  A story with decent potential but made so poorly. Uggghhhhh. Ugggghhhhh.

I have to point out that while Fritz Lang directed this movie, the above comments should in no way reflect upon my overall opinion of Fritz Lang as a filmmaker; I have the utmost respect for him. After fleeing Nazi Germany, Lang made his way to Hollywood and signed a deal with MGM, but had lots of creative disagreements with the studio, as he didn't like the stories they offered him, until he finally was given a story he liked, which became this movie, Fury, his first movie made in Hollywood. I have no idea how much creative control Lang was given over this movie; but considering how talented a filmmaker he was and how much I dislike this movie, I just have to wonder if he indeed had full creative control over it. Then again, this movie does seem to be generally well-liked (it currently has an incredibly high 7.9/10 rating on imdb), so who knows, maybe I just have bad taste  Wink


It was cool seeing a very young (and very skinny!) Walter Brennan.

I'll never understand why Sylvia Sidney had that really short hair for such a long time. In this movie as well as  in Street Scene (1931), she has this awful really short haircut, and delivers performances that can be called no more than  passable at best. In Dead End (1937), she finally let her hair grow out, and IMO delivered perhaps one of the 5 greatest performances ever by an actress.  Wink

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« Reply #10985 on: October 10, 2012, 01:57:27 AM »

also, the English title "Breathless" really misses the point of the French title A BOUT DE SOUFFLE, doesn't that mean something like "At the End of Breath"? I don't think it would have been that awkward to use that literal translation for the American title.

Well i'd say the literal translation would be "totally/really/veryverymuch out of breath".
"Out of breath" would work as a movie title, but Breathless sounds good to me. I does convey some kind of emergency, but you lose the "end of the line" feel.

« Last Edit: October 10, 2012, 02:03:18 AM by noodles_leone » Logged


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« Reply #10986 on: October 10, 2012, 02:55:42 AM »

Well i'd say the literal translation would be "totally/really/veryverymuch out of breath".
"Out of breath" would work as a movie title, but Breathless sounds good to me. I does convey some kind of emergency, but you lose the "end of the line" feel.

If it means "Out of Breath," it would seem that that is not referring to a moment in time (of Michel's death); rather, it's referring to a state-of-being verb, which may well refer to not just the moment of death, but Michel's general state, always running around, out of breath, running from one apartment to another, avoiding the police, and generally drifting from one place to another etc. And of course, there's plenty of room for double meanings.

if it means, as in some places I've read,  "at the end of breath," then I understood the point of the title to refer to the moment of death:  you know that Michel is finished when you see the last breath (of cigarette smoke!) leave his mouth. (It's kind of like The Death of a Soldier in GBU: he takes the puff of Blondie's cigar, exhales the smoke, and when the smoke stops you know he is dead). I figured the title refers to that, and again there may certainly be double meanings, I guess that Michel is running around, a very active character, and now it's all over, at the end of breath; and maybe referring also to the fact that it's at this final moment that the truth comes out, or whatever.

If the correct translation is "Out of Breath," then I think "Breathless" is close enough.
However, if the correct translation is "at the end of breath," then "Breathless" completely changes the meaning, as one is referring to a moment in time while the other is referring to a state-of-being verb.

IMO, once they decided to use an English title, they should always use a direct translation from the French,  as long as it makes sense -- and in this case, a direct translation does make sense in English, whether the direct translation is  "out of breath" or "at the end of breath." So they shouldn't have used "Breathless" either way.

---------------------

My general opinion on translating titles:   Wink

IDEALLY, they shouldn't use an English title at all: they should just use the title in its original language -- eg. "La Strada" and "Le Cercle Rouge" were never given English titles. That avoids the problem of having a title that is not translated properly (such as "Breathless"); and conversely, the problem that arises when a title is translated directly but shouldn't be, such as Truffaut's movie which has English title "The 400 Blows" which makes absolutely no sense and has nothing to do with movie, but is a direct translation of a French idiom but makes absolutely no sense here  Grin)

There are 2 (broad categories of) situations where I'd agree that using a translated title is okay: A)  if there is a direct and completely straightforward translation -- eg. "The Battle of Algiers" is a direct, straightforward translation of "La Battaglia di Algeri," plain and simple B) if the director or producer understand English well and they are the ones that chose the English title then of course they have the same right to choose the English title as they had to choose the original French title. But if it's just some idiot at the international distribution company that would be choosing the translated title, then I'd prefer that they just kept the French title instead.

« Last Edit: October 10, 2012, 02:56:47 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

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« Reply #10987 on: October 10, 2012, 04:23:38 AM »

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0027652/

Fury (1936) 5.5/10

What a shitty movie. Took a story that had good potential but did it all wrong.

I'm not really a fan but you've got it all backwards. The first half is great, the second contrived and preachy. I don't really appreciate Lang's "forgive the lynch mob" message either. Tracy's bizarre final speech is the clincher.

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« Reply #10988 on: October 10, 2012, 05:08:45 AM »

I'm not really a fan but you've got it all backwards. The first half is great, the second contrived and preachy. I don't really appreciate Lang's "forgive the lynch mob" message either. Tracy's bizarre final speech is the clincher.


when I say "the second half of the movie," I am referring to the part starting where Tracy rises and plots the revenge. I think that's awesome how this guy is planning the persecution by trial of those guys that "killed" him, even though he is still alive, and he is sitting there laughing by the radio as he is listening to the trial's proceedings. But once his brothers and Sidney start regretting it and change their minds about the revenge, that is where it starts getting preachy and I hate that part as well.

So I only liked the movie from the moment Tracy begins plotting his revenge, until the moment his brothers and Sidney start regretting it and getting preachy.

-------

Generally, I find  "forgiveness themes" to be perhaps the most unenjoyable movie theme imaginable.  I find the way that it's applied to be silly. Of course, if someone wrongs you and then sincerely regrets it and asks for your forgiveness, it is a great and righteous thing to forgive him. But the way the movies often portray it is so silly, like a guy is cracking you over the head with a sledgehammer and as he's swinging it, you are screaming "I forgive you, I forgive you!" I mean, COME ON. That is so ridiculous.  There is a proper time and place for everything in life -- including righteous character traits such the ability to forgive. The way people speak about forgiveness as the end all be all of life, how in every single situation no matter what, it's always and everywhere FORGIVE FORGIVE FORGIVE  Roll Eyes

Whether the focus of the movie is on the injured party granting forgiveness, or on the sinner achieving forgiveness from the one he injured, forgiveness is just not a very interesting movie theme for me. It's one of many very important character traits that i just don't find interesting as a storyline for a movie.

Do filmmakers really believe that audiences "root for" someone to be forgivenin the same way that they root for eg. Bogie and Bergman to be together in Casablanca, or Steve McQueen to catch the mobsters assassins in Bullitt, or the small-town team to win the championship in Hoosiers

[Of course, that's not to say that there are no good movies that involve forgiveness: The Informer is a good, but not because of the forgiveness theme, but perhaps despite it. I mean, the last line, where McLaglen says "Frankie, your mother forgives me!" was probably the worst line of the movie. I enjoyed the movie for all the others stuff, for McLaglen's great acting (his Oscar was well-deserved) and how he completely self-destructs, etc. The movie is very well-made, but I didn't give a rat's ass about whether or not McLaglen was forgiven by his friend's mother (and btw, who the fuck is she to forgive McLaglen, she's not the one who was killed?!  Roll Eyes)
I would have enjoyed the movie just as much (if not more) if it would have ended with him rolling around in the gutter and the word "forgiveness" never having been mentioned in the movie].

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« Reply #10989 on: October 11, 2012, 10:26:37 AM »


Generally, I find  "forgiveness themes" to be perhaps the most unenjoyable movie theme imaginable.  I find the way that it's applied to be silly. Of course, if someone wrongs you and then sincerely regrets it and asks for your forgiveness, it is a great and righteous thing to forgive him. But the way the movies often portray it is so silly, like a guy is cracking you over the head with a sledgehammer and as he's swinging it, you are screaming "I forgive you, I forgive you!" I mean, COME ON. That is so ridiculous.  There is a proper time and place for everything in life -- including righteous character traits such the ability to forgive. The way people speak about forgiveness as the end all be all of life, how in every single situation no matter what, it's always and everywhere FORGIVE FORGIVE FORGIVE  Roll Eyes
It's a great theme, just difficult to pull off. That's why most people go with a vengeance theme--much easier to do, even hacks have a hard time blowing it.

Shakespeare, of course, could do anything. He started out with one Revenge Tragedy called Titus Andronicus, and it was a big money-maker. His second Revenge Tragedy was a little something called Hamlet. After that . . . he gave the form up completely, even though Elizabethan and Jacobean audiences were willing to pay through the nose for more. Others picked up the slack (Webster, notably). Apparently, though, it wasn't something His Bardness was all that into. By the end of his career, Shakespeare had perfected a form that used the forgiveness theme very well indeed. If you want to see how such a thing can come off successfully, check out The Winter's Tale and The Tempest. Either can move you to tears.

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« Reply #10990 on: October 11, 2012, 01:48:29 PM »

It's a great theme, just difficult to pull off. That's why most people go with a vengeance theme--much easier to do, even hacks have a hard time blowing it.

Shakespeare, of course, could do anything. He started out with one Revenge Tragedy called Titus Andronicus, and it was a big money-maker. His second Revenge Tragedy was a little something called Hamlet. After that . . . he gave the form up completely, even though Elizabethan and Jacobean audiences were willing to pay through the nose for more. Others picked up the slack (Webster, notably). Apparently, though, it wasn't something His Bardness was all that into. By the end of his career, Shakespeare had perfected a form that used the forgiveness theme very well indeed. If you want to see how such a thing can come off successfully, check out The Winter's Tale and The Tempest. Either can move you to tears.

well give me a great MOVIE with a forgiveness theme -- where the forgiveness aspect is what makes the movie enjoyable and captivates the audience (NOT The Informer)

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« Reply #10991 on: October 11, 2012, 03:04:49 PM »

Dreyer's The Word (1954)

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« Reply #10992 on: October 11, 2012, 06:17:01 PM »

Park Row (1952) 5/10
A very disappointing movie by Samuel Fuller

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« Reply #10993 on: October 12, 2012, 09:40:57 AM »

Ice Station Zebra (1968) 6/10. First Blu-ray viewing. I'd forgotten this was supposed to be a roadshow picture--the "Overture" card at the beginning had me laughing. Yeah, this is some epic. Not. What it is is a pretty good first half, followed by a turgid and uninspired second one. Or to put it another way, while they're on the Submarine Set things look great, and when they switch to the Arctic Station Set things look pretty "meh." This new blu-ray, though, looks fantastic, for PQ it deserves a 10. Shame about the film.

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« Reply #10994 on: October 13, 2012, 04:24:16 PM »

Argo (2012) - 8/10. This works pretty well: Ben Affleck plays a CIA ex-fil op tasked with getting 6 Americans out of Tehran in 1979 (based on a true story). Stuffed to the gills with suspense, Alan Arkin and John Goodman put in frequent appearances for comic relief. However, things get prolonged and needlessly sappy at the end. Affleck has a beard to help him act. Setting and costumes are rendered well. Alexandre Desplat delivers his usual sonic abortion. SPOILER Argo is the name of the phony movie Affleck and company pretend they're making for their cover story. Arkin, the phony producer, when asked at a press event to explain the plot, replies "Argofuckyourself." This becomes a running gag. This is scriptwriting gold, destined to be remembered in the tradition of "We'll always have Paris" and "I'll be back." Can't wait to use it on this board.

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