Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 14, 2017, 01:45:16 PM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Rate The Last Movie You Saw
0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 784 785 [786] 787 788 ... 1170 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Rate The Last Movie You Saw  (Read 1836614 times)
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11775 on: March 27, 2013, 11:44:44 PM »

Ruby Gentry (1952) 7/10

I get no pleasure out of watching a Charlton Heston performance. Probably cuz of the annoying way he speaks.
The narration here is really bad; it needlessly hits you over the head with the theme again and again. They could have just had the narration over the framing scenes in beginning and end, and gotten rid of all the rest of the narration.

But overall, this is a good movie. Jennifer Jones was a good actress (though I can't understand why the studio couldn't pay a few bucks for her to go to speech therapy to learn how to say her s's). And Karl Malden is of course of one of the greatest supporting actors in movie history

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11776 on: March 28, 2013, 05:47:54 AM »

- Once Upon A Time In The West (1968): 4.5/5 stars [the last time I watched it, it was 4/5 stars, this movie is slowly growing on me, and became more awesome when I read a lot of background information on it from STDWD especially in regards to cinematic technique, symbolism, and meaning, soon it will probably be 5/5 stars].

Hoo ha! And within 3 or 4 viewings it might beat GBU Wink

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11777 on: March 28, 2013, 07:31:50 AM »

Sleepers (1996) 8/10

The narration is awful (as is the character who plays the narrator; Brad Pitt is the only adult member of the gang who gives a good performance). Robert De Niro, Dustin Hoffman, Kevin Bacon, and Minnie Driver are very good. There's some problems with dialogue; in many instances, the child actors sound like they are reading off scripts; IMO the movie is not directed very well, at times I thought they could have done a better job with the material.
And it's very obvious that this movie is NOT a true story, despite the writer and narrator insisting that it is (I won't even go into all the reasons why it can't be a true story; those should be obvious)

But this is a good movie.

(Even more fun than the movie was reading Roger Ebert's review, in which the genius Ebert who can find racism or homophobia in anything, says that this movie is homophobic http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19961018/REVIEWS/610180303/1023
Take this gem from the delusional Ebert "If you doubt that the movie depends on homophobia to justify its morality, ask yourself: If the boys had been beaten but not sexually molested, would the movie play the same way?"
I can just ask a simple question: supposing that instead of it being a group young boys that were raped and are now seeking revenge, it was a group of young girls. Would Ebert still imply that the revenge may be immoral? Or would he then say the movie is heterophobic?

Man, that motherfucker is delusional  Roll Eyes

Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11778 on: March 28, 2013, 09:58:50 PM »

Invictus (2009) 7.5/10  (blu-ray)

Morgan Freeman was amazing as Nelson Mandela.

so I just rented the blu rays of Invictus and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy from Netflix (the former is a WB film; the latter Universal). Each disc of course had the movie title and the studio logo, but otherwise was identical:  just a plain  grey disc with the word RENTAL on it.

Why do I mention this? Cuz these 2 discs made it almost impossible to get to the feature. First, you had to sit through a 5-minute ad for Univrsal films, or a 5-minute ad for a WB box-set of Eastwood films. You could fast-forward, but you could not skip it. Then, each disc had 5 previews. Again, you could fast-forward, but you couldn't skip chapters. And you couldn't press the Main Menu or Pop-up menu button either. Then, the various copyright warnings and studio logos come on for 20-seconds or so each; finally, you get the option to play the feature. Even with all my fast-forwarding, took 5 minutes to get to the feature. And I only noticed it with those 2 discs, both of which seem to be made by the same company that presses BR discs for rental?

WTF? are all new discs like that? They force disc-renters to sit through all that shit? what about the regular discs -- they never put disc-purchasers through that? WTF??

« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 10:00:37 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Senza
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 565


You think you're better that I am?


View Profile
« Reply #11779 on: March 29, 2013, 12:28:05 AM »

Hoo ha! And within 3 or 4 viewings it might beat GBU Wink

It will most likely equal it, but I'm not sure about beating it, GBU is actually very close to me, the first time I watched it, it was with my late grandmother [who loved very long epics], so it has sentimental value to me as well.


« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 12:29:46 AM by Senza » Logged

"Roll it up! Roll it up! I'll give you a good idea where you can put it!" - Tuco Benedicto Pacifico Juan Maria Ramirez
moviesceleton
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3928


The glance that makes holes in the silver screen


View Profile
« Reply #11780 on: March 29, 2013, 01:30:08 AM »

It will most likely equal it, but I'm not sure about beating it, GBU is actually very close to me, the first time I watched it, it was with my late grandmother [who loved very long epics], so it has sentimental value to me as well.
She sounds like a cool grandma Afro

Logged

"Once Upon a Time in America gets ten-minute ovation at Cannes"
Senza
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 565


You think you're better that I am?


View Profile
« Reply #11781 on: March 29, 2013, 03:34:55 AM »

Yep, very cool  Afro

Logged

"Roll it up! Roll it up! I'll give you a good idea where you can put it!" - Tuco Benedicto Pacifico Juan Maria Ramirez
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11782 on: March 29, 2013, 04:37:22 AM »

It will most likely equal it, but I'm not sure about beating it, GBU is actually very close to me, the first time I watched it, it was with my late grandmother [who loved very long epics], so it has sentimental value to me as well.

Smiley Seems unbeatable. And yep, cool grandma!

Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8446

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #11783 on: March 29, 2013, 08:14:32 AM »

Le Mans (1971) 7.5/10 (TCM)

Inevitably, this movie is compared to the other famous racing movie of that era, Grand Prix (1966), with James Garner. Steve McQueen was offered the lead in that movie but turned it down; he wanted to make a racing movie his way, and 5 years later he did, with Le Mans. IMO, GP is a much better movie; I liked the cinematography much better. Also, the image quality of TCM's print of GP is far better than their print of LM.

ML takes place over a single race, while GP takes place over the course of an entire season, so in GP, there are lots of melodramatic scenes between all the racing; while LM is based much more on the racing. Still, since the racing is all that matters, I prefer GP's filming of the racing scenes.


Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11784 on: March 29, 2013, 08:27:46 PM »

The Plough and the Stars - 4/10 - Stiff, melodramatic adaptation of Sean O'Casey's play of the Easter Rising. John Ford would seem an ideal choice after The Informer but his direction is uninspired, fumbling an overlarge cast and needlessly diffuse narrative. To be fair, RKO butchered the movie, excising O'Casey's more pointed political content to focus on melodrama (Barbara Stanwyck loves rebel Preston Foster but doesn't understand why he fights, etc.). Regardless of who's to blame the movie stinks. Stanwyck is terrible, a sentence I never thought I'd utter. The Anglo-Irish actors (Barry Fitzgerald, Moroni Olsen, Una O'OConnor) do respectable work. What a waste of a good story and great director.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
moviesceleton
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3928


The glance that makes holes in the silver screen


View Profile
« Reply #11785 on: March 30, 2013, 02:38:16 AM »

The Squid and the Whale (2005) - 7.5/10

Logged

"Once Upon a Time in America gets ten-minute ovation at Cannes"
Senza
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 565


You think you're better that I am?


View Profile
« Reply #11786 on: March 30, 2013, 05:41:51 AM »

Ben-Hur (1959): 4/5 stars

The Prestige (2006): 3.5/5 stars

Logged

"Roll it up! Roll it up! I'll give you a good idea where you can put it!" - Tuco Benedicto Pacifico Juan Maria Ramirez
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13705

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #11787 on: March 30, 2013, 02:58:10 PM »

Les amants de Montparnasse/ Montparnasse 19/ Modigliani of Montparnasse (1958). Gaumont blu-ray. 8/10. The dissolute painter Modigliani (Gérard Philipe) takes up with a virtuous young woman (Anouk Aimée) but she is unable to save him. I always find it odd that there was a time when films about painters were shot in black and white—the artists didn’t paint in black and white, after all. What then are we supposed to make of these monochromatic copies of famous masterpieces? Are they adequate for establishing the artists achievement? And if they aren’t how are we to decide whether all the suffering was worth it? And arent’t we being cheated of the very things that provide the interest in an otherwise uninteresting character? By way of compensation, in this case anyway, we get stunning photography of Philipe and Aimée—works of art themselves. Lino Ventura is also in the picture—hey, it’s a Jacques Becker film. Lino puts in an appearance early, then reappears around the middle of the film to explain why he’s in the picture (he’s an art dealer who plans to corner the Modigliani market at precisely the right moment), then he shows up at the end as Modigliani is dying (in at the kill to make a killing). The obvious message about the heartlessness of the art market is present, but perhaps also a sub-text can be discerned: better to be tough-as-nails Lino than pretty boy Gérard. Prescient of Becker if so, as Gérard Philip would die the following year at 36.

Van Gogh (1991). Gaumont blu-ray. 9/10. The dissolute (and apparently insane) painter Van Gogh takes up with a not-so-virtuous young woman but she is unable to save him. This 158 minute film has very little painting in it, even though we frequently see Vincent lugging his easel about the French countryside. Mostly it’s about the people Van Gogh interacted with during the last 70 days of his life. Certainly every frame of the film is a painting (never Van Goghs, though, usually in the manner of, say, Serrault). The great thing about the film is that Maurice Pialat has directed it so that no one in it knows it is Van Gogh’s last 70 days. When Van Gogh shows up after having shot himself offscreen, everybody, including the audience, is surprised. The tropes of melodrama are pretty much dispensed with here (and there is no music until the end credits). In fact, the banality of Van Gogh’s life is not only observed, it’s insisted upon. This is all to the good, but still, dropping 30 minutes from the film’s runtime would not have gone amiss.

Renoir
(2012). 35mm projection. 7/10. In 1915 a mysterious young woman (Christa Theret) appears at the estate of the celebrated painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir (Michel Bouquet) and offers to be his model. She quickly establishes herself as the artist’s muse, and soon Renoir can’t work without her.  Then Renoir’s son Jean (Vincent Rottiers) returns, apparently invalided out of WWI—he finds the girl pretty stimulating as well. This beautiful film, shot on locations on the Cote d’Azur, captures something of Renoir’s palette, with red predominating (in a sunlit grove, for instance, or in a girl’s hair). The hands of an art forger (Guy Ribes) are photographed sketching or painting imitations of famous works: you will believe that you’ve seen Renoir putting paint to canvas!

Visually the film is sumptuous. Where the film falls down is in the depiction of character (also in the wretched score by  Alexandre Desplat—why, why do they continue to use that hack?). Renoir pere is pretty interesting—eccentric old coots usually are. Renoir fils, though, is mind-numbingly bland. This is the man who would go on to direct The Grand Illusion?  The director, Gilles Bourdos, was at the screening I attended, and during the Q&A afterwards he admitted that he wasn’t as interested in the Renoirs as in the woman they (at least, artistically) shared, the woman who was the subject of the late paintings of Pierre-Auguste and who subsequently acted in Jean’s early films. I had a true A-ha! moment when he said that. That goes a long way toward explaining why Jean was so underdeveloped.  Still, it doesn’t explain why the part of the girl is so badly written—she’s a compendium of clichés (there’s even a scene where she displays her non-conformity by breaking precious crockery: shocking!).  Ms. Theret, who is quite lovely (and who was also at the screening, but disappointingly, without red hair) is a capable actress who only wants for a good part. Here's hoping she finds one soon. Meanwhile, for its visuals, Renoir is still worth seeing.

« Last Edit: March 30, 2013, 03:01:47 PM by dave jenkins » Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Groggy
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11458


This post gets Agnew's stamp of approval!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11788 on: March 30, 2013, 04:28:08 PM »

I sense a theme.

Logged


Saturday nights with Groggy
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13705

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #11789 on: March 30, 2013, 05:03:00 PM »

You ARE a bright one, what?

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Pages: 1 ... 784 785 [786] 787 788 ... 1170 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.287 seconds with 20 queries.